Date   

Re: There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

jimcoble2000
 

sewing DNA One bug at a time.

On Tuesday, August 10, 2021, 1:05:39 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Mark, thanks for your sacrifice and report.  Get well soon.

Roy


On Aug 9, 2021, at 10:52 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


I decided I would go to my out of the way dark site and try to see the naked eye Nova RS Oph. So I threw my big binoculars in the car printed out the star charts from Spaceweather and set off for the farm fields.

Driving at night is not quite as easy with mismatched eyes. My fixed eye is fine at night but the unfocussed eye is not too happy with a large pupil. It does not make a difference during the day but becomes more challenging at night. Anyways I got to the deserted spot and proceeded to set up the binoculars. First thing, forgot to bring a red flashlight to look at the dumb charts. The folding chair I brought was really too high for the tripod so I extended the legs to match the height. Whoever designed the Orion legs must be from China or the other side of the world. The tightening screws are on the inside where it is a royal PIA to loosen and adjust. Normally I never fool with these but tonight I had to. All this while being eaten alive by millions of mosquitos. They were freaking awful.

The charts, as are most from magazines and web sites, are not the best. You can't tell what scale they are at. Binoculars too have a distinct disadvantage for stellar objects as pointing them is nowhere near as precise as a one power telescope or a guided scope. Fortunately the star should stick out as the brightest star in the area. The star patterns were not the best on the chart so it took some time to figure out where the hell I was. I did eventually find it; oh did I mention being eaten alive while doing this? I knew I was in the area but to recognize a pattern that looked like the chart. As I said it took some work.

At the end of the session I was able to see the Nova naked eye with averted vision. The sky was darker than Kent's but not Coinjock material. Chesapeake light dome has gotten much worse due to LED lamps . Fortunately I was looking in the south away from the west. I also had to star hop a bit but did manage to see it both with binoculars and naked eye. I think marginal 6th magnitude. Maybe a touch brighter but not much to compare it to.

I did see a nice meteor though as compensation; did I mention I was being eaten at the same time as seeing it?

It is always a mistake to rush to see something but who knows how long these last so I threw it all together at the last moment. That added to the frenzied nature of the observation. I threw all the gear into the back of the car in the dark and got out of dodge with all it's bugs.

Normally RS is 12.5 to 13th magnitude.


Re: Uranometria 2000.0

George Reynolds
 

Kent,

You kept your observing logs in SkyTools.  What do you do now?  Does Sky Safari have such a feature?  (I only have the free version on my phone.)

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, August 12, 2021, 10:51:21 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I haven't used a printed star atlas in decades but Uranometria is among the very best of the lot. Gosh, I started out with Norton's Star Atlas. Even when I got mine in the sixties it had already been in print for years. I graduated from that to the huge Skalnate Pleso, followed by the SAO (Smithsononian Astrophysical Observatory) Atlas.. When the Skalnate Pleso ceased publication Perry Ramakalus published a similar atlas, The Sky Atlas 2000. That remained my reference until he brought out the Uranometria. 

I abandoned all with the release of the electronic star atlas, SkyTools . I've now abandoned that for SkySafari on my smartphone. It's amazing how technology changes, making it easier for us to navigate the night sky.


Kent


Re: Uranometria 2000.0

Kent Blackwell
 

I haven't used a printed star atlas in decades but Uranometria is among the very best of the lot. Gosh, I started out with Norton's Star Atlas. Even when I got mine in the sixties it had already been in print for years. I graduated from that to the huge Skalnate Pleso, followed by the SAO (Smithsononian Astrophysical Observatory) Atlas.. When the Skalnate Pleso ceased publication Perry Ramakalus published a similar atlas, The Sky Atlas 2000. That remained my reference until he brought out the Uranometria. 

I abandoned all with the release of the electronic star atlas, SkyTools . I've now abandoned that for SkySafari on my smartphone. It's amazing how technology changes, making it easier for us to navigate the night sky.

Kent


Uranometria 2000.0

George Reynolds
 

I don't get out to really dark skies very often, so I don't use the Willmann-Bell (RIP) book, Uranometria 2000.0 very often, but It is truly a great resource for stargazing.  Today I actually read the "Acknowledgements" (which I usually skip), and was delighted to find in the 2001 edition of Uranometria our friend Kent Blackwell mentioned as providing valuable assistance to the authors/editors Wil Tirion, Barry Rappaport, and Will Remaklus.  (Is he the son of Perry Remaklus of Willmann-Bell (RIP)?)

Congratulations (belatedly), Kent!

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Unusual first light

George Reynolds
 

Oops!  my reply called you "Jim" (after jimcoble).  I meant to say, "Mark."

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, August 5, 2021, 10:38:59 PM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


We have all had multiple telescopes that each had a first light but it is not often you get a chance to first light a new repaired eye. This was the first night, after having the first of two cataract surgeries performed, that I was able to try out a new lens. No not eyepiece; eye lens. It is only a first impression with a limited target, Jupiter, but what a difference in vision at the telescope. The uncorrected eye shows Jupiter as a dull yellow disk. The corrected eye, not my dominant observing eye, shows Jupiter a much brighter white with vivid colors in the bands. There were no bad side effects such as halos or flaring. That was good. Dim stars were much brighter and easier to acquire with the corrected eye. Not having to take glasses on and off for the one power is quite nice.

After decades of observing with you all, Kent, Bird, and the old group, you think it will never change and go on forever just the same as it was 25 years ago. But time marches on at this later life stage and the eyes were wearing out fast. The universe was outlasting me as it always does for everybody. I did not realize how bad I had gotten until we replaced the lens of my eye. The difference is remarkable. So far so good. One eye down, one to go. The primary observing eye is in a couple of weeks. First light is pretty good so far. More to evaluate in the coming months but a good start on a second chance. Emoji


Re: Unusual first light

George Reynolds
 

Thanks, Jim, for the report.  I am going to have to get cataract surgery too.  My doctor, Dr. Griffey, says he is ready anytime I am.  I think I'll get it in my observing eye (the left) first.  I hope I have the same results as you.  I am getting tired of looking up at the sky and seeing very little.  What doctor did the surgery for you?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Thursday, August 5, 2021, 10:38:59 PM EDT, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


We have all had multiple telescopes that each had a first light but it is not often you get a chance to first light a new repaired eye. This was the first night, after having the first of two cataract surgeries performed, that I was able to try out a new lens. No not eyepiece; eye lens. It is only a first impression with a limited target, Jupiter, but what a difference in vision at the telescope. The uncorrected eye shows Jupiter as a dull yellow disk. The corrected eye, not my dominant observing eye, shows Jupiter a much brighter white with vivid colors in the bands. There were no bad side effects such as halos or flaring. That was good. Dim stars were much brighter and easier to acquire with the corrected eye. Not having to take glasses on and off for the one power is quite nice.

After decades of observing with you all, Kent, Bird, and the old group, you think it will never change and go on forever just the same as it was 25 years ago. But time marches on at this later life stage and the eyes were wearing out fast. The universe was outlasting me as it always does for everybody. I did not realize how bad I had gotten until we replaced the lens of my eye. The difference is remarkable. So far so good. One eye down, one to go. The primary observing eye is in a couple of weeks. First light is pretty good so far. More to evaluate in the coming months but a good start on a second chance. Emoji


Re: There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

Richard W Roberts
 

I observed it last night from my front yard with my 15x70 binoculars.

 

Was very easy to find using my S&T pocket sky atlas and the attached AAVSO chart.

 

The star’s brightness was between the 4.6 and 5.4 comps to the northeast. I estimated the magnitude at 4.8 and reported the observation into the AAVSO’s database.

 

Was able to get some science done during the commercial break of a Star Trek movie.

 

Looks like will be able to make another visual estimate tonight. This star typically fades fairly rapidly.

 

Looks

Clear Skies,

Rich Roberts (RRIA)

(757) 532-5198

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io [mailto:BackBayAstro@groups.io] On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 10, 2021 1:05 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Cc: kentblackwell <kent@...>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

 

Mark, thanks for your sacrifice and report.  Get well soon.

 

Roy



On Aug 9, 2021, at 10:52 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:



I decided I would go to my out of the way dark site and try to see the naked eye Nova RS Oph. So I threw my big binoculars in the car printed out the star charts from Spaceweather and set off for the farm fields.

 

Driving at night is not quite as easy with mismatched eyes. My fixed eye is fine at night but the unfocussed eye is not too happy with a large pupil. It does not make a difference during the day but becomes more challenging at night. Anyways I got to the deserted spot and proceeded to set up the binoculars. First thing, forgot to bring a red flashlight to look at the dumb charts. The folding chair I brought was really too high for the tripod so I extended the legs to match the height. Whoever designed the Orion legs must be from China or the other side of the world. The tightening screws are on the inside where it is a royal PIA to loosen and adjust. Normally I never fool with these but tonight I had to. All this while being eaten alive by millions of mosquitos. They were freaking awful.

 

The charts, as are most from magazines and web sites, are not the best. You can't tell what scale they are at. Binoculars too have a distinct disadvantage for stellar objects as pointing them is nowhere near as precise as a one power telescope or a guided scope. Fortunately the star should stick out as the brightest star in the area. The star patterns were not the best on the chart so it took some time to figure out where the hell I was. I did eventually find it; oh did I mention being eaten alive while doing this? I knew I was in the area but to recognize a pattern that looked like the chart. As I said it took some work.

 

At the end of the session I was able to see the Nova naked eye with averted vision. The sky was darker than Kent's but not Coinjock material. Chesapeake light dome has gotten much worse due to LED lamps . Fortunately I was looking in the south away from the west. I also had to star hop a bit but did manage to see it both with binoculars and naked eye. I think marginal 6th magnitude. Maybe a touch brighter but not much to compare it to.

 

I did see a nice meteor though as compensation; did I mention I was being eaten at the same time as seeing it?

 

It is always a mistake to rush to see something but who knows how long these last so I threw it all together at the last moment. That added to the frenzied nature of the observation. I threw all the gear into the back of the car in the dark and got out of dodge with all it's bugs.

 

Normally RS is 12.5 to 13th magnitude.


Perseids Meteor Shower Watch Party

Shawn Loescher
 
Edited

You're invited to the Heritage Park & Joel C. Bradshaw Fairgrounds on the outskirts of Windsor, VA to observe the Perseids meteor shower. Club members will be on location all evening on the 11th until sunrise on the 12th.

Event Information on the Night Sky Network: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/club/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=118296

Light Pollution Map for this location: https://www.lightpollutionmap.info/#zoom=10.00&lat=36.8507&lon=-76.7456&layers=B0FFFFFFTFFFFFFFFFF

Date: Wednesday, 8/11/2021 - Thursday, 8/12/2021

Time: 8:00 PM - 6:30 AM Eastern

Location: Heritage Park & Joel C. Bradshaw Fairgrounds, 21311 Courthouse Hwy, Windsor, VA 2348

Backup Date: the next day, so evening of the 12th and morning of the 13th.


Re: There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

Kent Blackwell
 

That makes my head hurt just thinking about it. Cool you got to see it, even if It required perverted vision.

Glen Howell invited me to go to Gates NC. Sandra is here so I couldn’t go, but we all went to our friends Hal & Buzzy Hamberg to dinner and watch the sunset over a glass(es) of wine from their beautiful home on the Lynnhaven River.

We got home @11:00 (2300???) so I set up the 5” Takahashi and showed Sandra Saturn and Jupiter. Wow! Saturn was gorgeous and the GRS was transiting on Jupiter.


On Aug 10, 2021, at 1:05 AM, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

Mark, thanks for your sacrifice and report.  Get well soon.

Roy


On Aug 9, 2021, at 10:52 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


I decided I would go to my out of the way dark site and try to see the naked eye Nova RS Oph. So I threw my big binoculars in the car printed out the star charts from Spaceweather and set off for the farm fields.

Driving at night is not quite as easy with mismatched eyes. My fixed eye is fine at night but the unfocussed eye is not too happy with a large pupil. It does not make a difference during the day but becomes more challenging at night. Anyways I got to the deserted spot and proceeded to set up the binoculars. First thing, forgot to bring a red flashlight to look at the dumb charts. The folding chair I brought was really too high for the tripod so I extended the legs to match the height. Whoever designed the Orion legs must be from China or the other side of the world. The tightening screws are on the inside where it is a royal PIA to loosen and adjust. Normally I never fool with these but tonight I had to. All this while being eaten alive by millions of mosquitos. They were freaking awful.

The charts, as are most from magazines and web sites, are not the best. You can't tell what scale they are at. Binoculars too have a distinct disadvantage for stellar objects as pointing them is nowhere near as precise as a one power telescope or a guided scope. Fortunately the star should stick out as the brightest star in the area. The star patterns were not the best on the chart so it took some time to figure out where the hell I was. I did eventually find it; oh did I mention being eaten alive while doing this? I knew I was in the area but to recognize a pattern that looked like the chart. As I said it took some work.

At the end of the session I was able to see the Nova naked eye with averted vision. The sky was darker than Kent's but not Coinjock material. Chesapeake light dome has gotten much worse due to LED lamps . Fortunately I was looking in the south away from the west. I also had to star hop a bit but did manage to see it both with binoculars and naked eye. I think marginal 6th magnitude. Maybe a touch brighter but not much to compare it to.

I did see a nice meteor though as compensation; did I mention I was being eaten at the same time as seeing it?

It is always a mistake to rush to see something but who knows how long these last so I threw it all together at the last moment. That added to the frenzied nature of the observation. I threw all the gear into the back of the car in the dark and got out of dodge with all it's bugs.

Normally RS is 12.5 to 13th magnitude.


Re: There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

Roy Diffrient
 

Mark, thanks for your sacrifice and report.  Get well soon.

Roy


On Aug 9, 2021, at 10:52 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


I decided I would go to my out of the way dark site and try to see the naked eye Nova RS Oph. So I threw my big binoculars in the car printed out the star charts from Spaceweather and set off for the farm fields.

Driving at night is not quite as easy with mismatched eyes. My fixed eye is fine at night but the unfocussed eye is not too happy with a large pupil. It does not make a difference during the day but becomes more challenging at night. Anyways I got to the deserted spot and proceeded to set up the binoculars. First thing, forgot to bring a red flashlight to look at the dumb charts. The folding chair I brought was really too high for the tripod so I extended the legs to match the height. Whoever designed the Orion legs must be from China or the other side of the world. The tightening screws are on the inside where it is a royal PIA to loosen and adjust. Normally I never fool with these but tonight I had to. All this while being eaten alive by millions of mosquitos. They were freaking awful.

The charts, as are most from magazines and web sites, are not the best. You can't tell what scale they are at. Binoculars too have a distinct disadvantage for stellar objects as pointing them is nowhere near as precise as a one power telescope or a guided scope. Fortunately the star should stick out as the brightest star in the area. The star patterns were not the best on the chart so it took some time to figure out where the hell I was. I did eventually find it; oh did I mention being eaten alive while doing this? I knew I was in the area but to recognize a pattern that looked like the chart. As I said it took some work.

At the end of the session I was able to see the Nova naked eye with averted vision. The sky was darker than Kent's but not Coinjock material. Chesapeake light dome has gotten much worse due to LED lamps . Fortunately I was looking in the south away from the west. I also had to star hop a bit but did manage to see it both with binoculars and naked eye. I think marginal 6th magnitude. Maybe a touch brighter but not much to compare it to.

I did see a nice meteor though as compensation; did I mention I was being eaten at the same time as seeing it?

It is always a mistake to rush to see something but who knows how long these last so I threw it all together at the last moment. That added to the frenzied nature of the observation. I threw all the gear into the back of the car in the dark and got out of dodge with all it's bugs.

Normally RS is 12.5 to 13th magnitude.


There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

jimcoble2000
 

I decided I would go to my out of the way dark site and try to see the naked eye Nova RS Oph. So I threw my big binoculars in the car printed out the star charts from Spaceweather and set off for the farm fields.

Driving at night is not quite as easy with mismatched eyes. My fixed eye is fine at night but the unfocussed eye is not too happy with a large pupil. It does not make a difference during the day but becomes more challenging at night. Anyways I got to the deserted spot and proceeded to set up the binoculars. First thing, forgot to bring a red flashlight to look at the dumb charts. The folding chair I brought was really too high for the tripod so I extended the legs to match the height. Whoever designed the Orion legs must be from China or the other side of the world. The tightening screws are on the inside where it is a royal PIA to loosen and adjust. Normally I never fool with these but tonight I had to. All this while being eaten alive by millions of mosquitos. They were freaking awful.

The charts, as are most from magazines and web sites, are not the best. You can't tell what scale they are at. Binoculars too have a distinct disadvantage for stellar objects as pointing them is nowhere near as precise as a one power telescope or a guided scope. Fortunately the star should stick out as the brightest star in the area. The star patterns were not the best on the chart so it took some time to figure out where the hell I was. I did eventually find it; oh did I mention being eaten alive while doing this? I knew I was in the area but to recognize a pattern that looked like the chart. As I said it took some work.

At the end of the session I was able to see the Nova naked eye with averted vision. The sky was darker than Kent's but not Coinjock material. Chesapeake light dome has gotten much worse due to LED lamps . Fortunately I was looking in the south away from the west. I also had to star hop a bit but did manage to see it both with binoculars and naked eye. I think marginal 6th magnitude. Maybe a touch brighter but not much to compare it to.

I did see a nice meteor though as compensation; did I mention I was being eaten at the same time as seeing it?

It is always a mistake to rush to see something but who knows how long these last so I threw it all together at the last moment. That added to the frenzied nature of the observation. I threw all the gear into the back of the car in the dark and got out of dodge with all it's bugs.

Normally RS is 12.5 to 13th magnitude.


Stuanton River Star Party

Jonathan Scheetz
 

I've decided that I'm going to this.  I watched several YouTube videos on this and it looks like a really good time.  

I liked this two videos the best:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvBQdRTmU_4&list=WL&index=31&t=18s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijKtEdTwS84&list=WL&index=34&t=18s

I will be going earlier in the week as I have a wedding on Saturday that my wife says I HAVE TO attend.
I'll be doing tent camping and will set up next to my car on the field.
After watching the drone footage it looks like the middle row on the end away from the visitor center looks like a good spot.
I'll be sure to wear my BBAA tee-shirt and hat (when I get them). 

Do we keep track of who says they are going to these events?

Jonathan


Re: Unusual first light

jimcoble2000
 

oh somewhere along the line. Should only require a short sentence or two.

On Sunday, August 8, 2021, 8:10:23 PM EDT, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


Wait!  When did we stop talking about Mark? 🤣🤣🤣


On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:51, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


First Class Result for a First Class Person!

On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:06 39, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

seems so.

On Friday, August 6, 2021, 11:01:08 AM EDT, Bruce via groups.io <galaxydoc@...> wrote:


Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Re: Unusual first light

Matthew Cook
 

Wait!  When did we stop talking about Mark? 🤣🤣🤣


On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:51, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:

First Class Result for a First Class Person!

On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:06 39, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

seems so.

On Friday, August 6, 2021, 11:01:08 AM EDT, Bruce via groups.io <galaxydoc@...> wrote:


Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Dale Carey
 

I completely disagree Bill, I've been at lease 8 times. Just like any star party, everyone leaves their stuff out when not on the field. Nobody has had things stolen. Also, electric power is
available to all, just bring an extension cord. I set up a canopy on the field and put my camper in the  a regular elec/water campsite just 100' from the field. I ride my bike back and
forth.. Plenty of parking next to your gear if you camp on field. The field is flat and hard dirt/grass. One of the best close star parties out there. The food is great, showers are great and 
the comradery is always the best.
Dale 


-----Original Message-----
From: William Rust <willrust@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2021 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Knock down as much gear as you can and stow it.  You wear a red headlight to see and don't worry about it.  Everyone has this problem.  But, if you leave your stuff unattended, it will probably walk off.  The other thing you could do is put your scope inside an astro-tent and sleep with it.  SRSP has power every hundred feet throughout the site.  They will not let you use a generator after 10 pm(time?). Incidentally, the field is reinforced with plastic mesh.  I had trouble with a Silverado.

bill


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...>
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 2:11 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions
 
You can camp next to your equipment on the field. I have been there when 4 wheel drive was required. Also have also seen people with 2 wheel being  pulled out with a tractor. Not to worry!  If it's really wet big campers will be put in the parking lot...next to the field.

Stu

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:24 PM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:
From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

William Rust
 

Knock down as much gear as you can and stow it.  You wear a red headlight to see and don't worry about it.  Everyone has this problem.  But, if you leave your stuff unattended, it will probably walk off.  The other thing you could do is put your scope inside an astro-tent and sleep with it.  SRSP has power every hundred feet throughout the site.  They will not let you use a generator after 10 pm(time?). Incidentally, the field is reinforced with plastic mesh.  I had trouble with a Silverado.

bill


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...>
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 2:11 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions
 
You can camp next to your equipment on the field. I have been there when 4 wheel drive was required. Also have also seen people with 2 wheel being  pulled out with a tractor. Not to worry!  If it's really wet big campers will be put in the parking lot...next to the field.

Stu

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:24 PM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:
From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Jonathan Scheetz
 

Ok.  Thank you everyone.  Thank makes sense.


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Stu Beaber
 

You can camp next to your equipment on the field. I have been there when 4 wheel drive was required. Also have also seen people with 2 wheel being  pulled out with a tractor. Not to worry!  If it's really wet big campers will be put in the parking lot...next to the field.

Stu


On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:24 PM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:
From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

RapidEye
 

Bob is correct, with one caveat.
If you have a large RV you won't be able to drive that on the observing field, you'll have to park in the lot next to it.
But for tent and or small trailer camping, you can drive and camp right on the field.
One year it was super muddy so they had to bring a tractor over to pull people out at the end of the weekend if you didn't have 4WD.
<RE>

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:42 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

You are reading the general viewing, not during the SRSP dates.   

 

Weather depending, you should be able to park on the field with your equipment.  In the past, the field has become muddy and parking was restricted.

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Scheetz
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 1:24 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

 

From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

bob414
 

You are reading the general viewing, not during the SRSP dates.   

 

Weather depending, you should be able to park on the field with your equipment.  In the past, the field has become muddy and parking was restricted.

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Scheetz
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 1:24 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

 

From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan

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