Date   

There is no such thing as impromptu astronomy. Nova RS Oph.

jimcoble2000
 

I decided I would go to my out of the way dark site and try to see the naked eye Nova RS Oph. So I threw my big binoculars in the car printed out the star charts from Spaceweather and set off for the farm fields.

Driving at night is not quite as easy with mismatched eyes. My fixed eye is fine at night but the unfocussed eye is not too happy with a large pupil. It does not make a difference during the day but becomes more challenging at night. Anyways I got to the deserted spot and proceeded to set up the binoculars. First thing, forgot to bring a red flashlight to look at the dumb charts. The folding chair I brought was really too high for the tripod so I extended the legs to match the height. Whoever designed the Orion legs must be from China or the other side of the world. The tightening screws are on the inside where it is a royal PIA to loosen and adjust. Normally I never fool with these but tonight I had to. All this while being eaten alive by millions of mosquitos. They were freaking awful.

The charts, as are most from magazines and web sites, are not the best. You can't tell what scale they are at. Binoculars too have a distinct disadvantage for stellar objects as pointing them is nowhere near as precise as a one power telescope or a guided scope. Fortunately the star should stick out as the brightest star in the area. The star patterns were not the best on the chart so it took some time to figure out where the hell I was. I did eventually find it; oh did I mention being eaten alive while doing this? I knew I was in the area but to recognize a pattern that looked like the chart. As I said it took some work.

At the end of the session I was able to see the Nova naked eye with averted vision. The sky was darker than Kent's but not Coinjock material. Chesapeake light dome has gotten much worse due to LED lamps . Fortunately I was looking in the south away from the west. I also had to star hop a bit but did manage to see it both with binoculars and naked eye. I think marginal 6th magnitude. Maybe a touch brighter but not much to compare it to.

I did see a nice meteor though as compensation; did I mention I was being eaten at the same time as seeing it?

It is always a mistake to rush to see something but who knows how long these last so I threw it all together at the last moment. That added to the frenzied nature of the observation. I threw all the gear into the back of the car in the dark and got out of dodge with all it's bugs.

Normally RS is 12.5 to 13th magnitude.


Stuanton River Star Party

Jonathan Scheetz
 

I've decided that I'm going to this.  I watched several YouTube videos on this and it looks like a really good time.  

I liked this two videos the best:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvBQdRTmU_4&list=WL&index=31&t=18s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijKtEdTwS84&list=WL&index=34&t=18s

I will be going earlier in the week as I have a wedding on Saturday that my wife says I HAVE TO attend.
I'll be doing tent camping and will set up next to my car on the field.
After watching the drone footage it looks like the middle row on the end away from the visitor center looks like a good spot.
I'll be sure to wear my BBAA tee-shirt and hat (when I get them). 

Do we keep track of who says they are going to these events?

Jonathan


Re: Unusual first light

jimcoble2000
 

oh somewhere along the line. Should only require a short sentence or two.

On Sunday, August 8, 2021, 8:10:23 PM EDT, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


Wait!  When did we stop talking about Mark? 🤣🤣🤣


On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:51, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


First Class Result for a First Class Person!

On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:06 39, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

seems so.

On Friday, August 6, 2021, 11:01:08 AM EDT, Bruce via groups.io <galaxydoc@...> wrote:


Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Re: Unusual first light

Matthew Cook
 

Wait!  When did we stop talking about Mark? 🤣🤣🤣


On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:51, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:

First Class Result for a First Class Person!

On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:06 39, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

seems so.

On Friday, August 6, 2021, 11:01:08 AM EDT, Bruce via groups.io <galaxydoc@...> wrote:


Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Dale Carey
 

I completely disagree Bill, I've been at lease 8 times. Just like any star party, everyone leaves their stuff out when not on the field. Nobody has had things stolen. Also, electric power is
available to all, just bring an extension cord. I set up a canopy on the field and put my camper in the  a regular elec/water campsite just 100' from the field. I ride my bike back and
forth.. Plenty of parking next to your gear if you camp on field. The field is flat and hard dirt/grass. One of the best close star parties out there. The food is great, showers are great and 
the comradery is always the best.
Dale 


-----Original Message-----
From: William Rust <willrust@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2021 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Knock down as much gear as you can and stow it.  You wear a red headlight to see and don't worry about it.  Everyone has this problem.  But, if you leave your stuff unattended, it will probably walk off.  The other thing you could do is put your scope inside an astro-tent and sleep with it.  SRSP has power every hundred feet throughout the site.  They will not let you use a generator after 10 pm(time?). Incidentally, the field is reinforced with plastic mesh.  I had trouble with a Silverado.

bill


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...>
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 2:11 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions
 
You can camp next to your equipment on the field. I have been there when 4 wheel drive was required. Also have also seen people with 2 wheel being  pulled out with a tractor. Not to worry!  If it's really wet big campers will be put in the parking lot...next to the field.

Stu

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:24 PM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:
From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

William Rust
 

Knock down as much gear as you can and stow it.  You wear a red headlight to see and don't worry about it.  Everyone has this problem.  But, if you leave your stuff unattended, it will probably walk off.  The other thing you could do is put your scope inside an astro-tent and sleep with it.  SRSP has power every hundred feet throughout the site.  They will not let you use a generator after 10 pm(time?). Incidentally, the field is reinforced with plastic mesh.  I had trouble with a Silverado.

bill


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...>
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 2:11 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions
 
You can camp next to your equipment on the field. I have been there when 4 wheel drive was required. Also have also seen people with 2 wheel being  pulled out with a tractor. Not to worry!  If it's really wet big campers will be put in the parking lot...next to the field.

Stu

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:24 PM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:
From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Jonathan Scheetz
 

Ok.  Thank you everyone.  Thank makes sense.


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Stu Beaber
 

You can camp next to your equipment on the field. I have been there when 4 wheel drive was required. Also have also seen people with 2 wheel being  pulled out with a tractor. Not to worry!  If it's really wet big campers will be put in the parking lot...next to the field.

Stu


On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:24 PM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:
From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

RapidEye
 

Bob is correct, with one caveat.
If you have a large RV you won't be able to drive that on the observing field, you'll have to park in the lot next to it.
But for tent and or small trailer camping, you can drive and camp right on the field.
One year it was super muddy so they had to bring a tractor over to pull people out at the end of the weekend if you didn't have 4WD.
<RE>

On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 1:42 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

You are reading the general viewing, not during the SRSP dates.   

 

Weather depending, you should be able to park on the field with your equipment.  In the past, the field has become muddy and parking was restricted.

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Scheetz
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 1:24 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

 

From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

bob414
 

You are reading the general viewing, not during the SRSP dates.   

 

Weather depending, you should be able to park on the field with your equipment.  In the past, the field has become muddy and parking was restricted.

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Scheetz
Sent: Friday, August 6, 2021 1:24 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

 

From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Stuanton River Star Party equipment logistics questions

Jonathan Scheetz
 

From what I see on at http://chaosastro.org/starparty/ you can set up your equipment on the field but have to camp nearby.
I am confused about how the logistics of this would work.
Would you be able to use your vehicle to get your equipment to and from the site?  This seems like it might work for setup but not when finished observing since you wouldn't want to disturb the other observers.
That implies you would have to transport your equipment back to your campsite with a wagon or something in the dark.  With tripod, telescope and accessories getting all that in a wagon would be pretty difficult.
I expect I am over complicating this.
For those of you attending the star party how do you expect this to work?

Thank you.
Jonathan


Re: Unusual first light

Bird Taylor
 

First Class Result for a First Class Person!

On Aug 6, 2021, at 11:06 39, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

seems so.

On Friday, August 6, 2021, 11:01:08 AM EDT, Bruce via groups.io <galaxydoc@...> wrote:


Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Re: Unusual first light

jimcoble2000
 

seems so.

On Friday, August 6, 2021, 11:01:08 AM EDT, Bruce via groups.io <galaxydoc@...> wrote:


Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Re: Unusual first light

Dr Bruce
 

Mark,

Looks like you had a first class result! 


Dr Bruce 


Last Night

Ian Stewart
 

Wow a surprisingly wonderful evening last night. Very good seeing compared to what I've had lately. I was having trouble keeping up with Kent's observing lists with my refactor on a manual alt/az mount so I finally broke down and put digital setting circles on it. Hooked up to sky safari they work great and finding elusive doubles got a whole lot easier ... Cheers Ian


Re: [VPAS] Unusual first light

Ted Forte
 

Sounds encouraging.  I’m thinking of doing it soon.

 

 

From: VPAS@groups.io <VPAS@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 5, 2021 7:39 PM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; VPAS <vpas@groups.io>
Subject: [VPAS] Unusual first light

 

We have all had multiple telescopes that each had a first light but it is not often you get a chance to first light a new repaired eye. This was the first night, after having the first of two cataract surgeries performed, that I was able to try out a new lens. No not eyepiece; eye lens. It is only a first impression with a limited target, Jupiter, but what a difference in vision at the telescope. The uncorrected eye shows Jupiter as a dull yellow disk. The corrected eye, not my dominant observing eye, shows Jupiter a much brighter white with vivid colors in the bands. There were no bad side effects such as halos or flaring. That was good. Dim stars were much brighter and easier to acquire with the corrected eye. Not having to take glasses on and off for the one power is quite nice.

 

After decades of observing with you all, Kent, Bird, and the old group, you think it will never change and go on forever just the same as it was 25 years ago. But time marches on at this later life stage and the eyes were wearing out fast. The universe was outlasting me as it always does for everybody. I did not realize how bad I had gotten until we replaced the lens of my eye. The difference is remarkable. So far so good. One eye down, one to go. The primary observing eye is in a couple of weeks. First light is pretty good so far. More to evaluate in the coming months but a good start on a second chance. Emoji


Re: Unusual first light

jimcoble2000
 

So am I. Glad I didn't lose much or anything important so far. Maybe a bit of eye relief. With short eye relief orthos seem a bit harder to use and see the stop. Excellent detail though. The shorter eye relief is not too much loss as you use the center anyways for planets but it does seem I need to get closer to see the sharp field stop. Doesn't make a difference with wide field eye pieces. Oddly enough things look a bit larger in the fixed eye. I can't say if this is an illusion but it sure looks like it.

On Thursday, August 5, 2021, 11:38:34 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Hey Mark, glad it’s working out. My wife just went through it and noted the same amazing color and brightness changes.






Re: Unusual first light

Ian Stewart
 

Hey Mark, glad it’s working out. My wife just went through it and noted the same amazing color and brightness changes.


Re: [VPAS] Unusual first light

bob414
 

Preaching to the choir!

 

I had mine done 2 years ago,  And I agree, what a different.  White now, used to look beige and dimmer, in comparison

 

I was amazed how some people  (mostly younger) could walk around in the dark at ECSP.  Now, I know, everything is brighter! .  It was like “Wearing your Sunglasses at night”, when you have cataracts.

 

Bob

 

From: VPAS@groups.io <VPAS@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, August 5, 2021 10:39 PM
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; VPAS <vpas@groups.io>
Subject: [VPAS] Unusual first light

 

We have all had multiple telescopes that each had a first light but it is not often you get a chance to first light a new repaired eye. This was the first night, after having the first of two cataract surgeries performed, that I was able to try out a new lens. No not eyepiece; eye lens. It is only a first impression with a limited target, Jupiter, but what a difference in vision at the telescope. The uncorrected eye shows Jupiter as a dull yellow disk. The corrected eye, not my dominant observing eye, shows Jupiter a much brighter white with vivid colors in the bands. There were no bad side effects such as halos or flaring. That was good. Dim stars were much brighter and easier to acquire with the corrected eye. Not having to take glasses on and off for the one power is quite nice.

 

After decades of observing with you all, Kent, Bird, and the old group, you think it will never change and go on forever just the same as it was 25 years ago. But time marches on at this later life stage and the eyes were wearing out fast. The universe was outlasting me as it always does for everybody. I did not realize how bad I had gotten until we replaced the lens of my eye. The difference is remarkable. So far so good. One eye down, one to go. The primary observing eye is in a couple of weeks. First light is pretty good so far. More to evaluate in the coming months but a good start on a second chance. Emoji


Re: Unusual first light

Roy Diffrient
 

Glad it’s working out Mark.  I’ve read that the success rate is very high on that surgery with few complications.  I’m sure more of us will get there as the years go by, and glad to hear that there’s a significant improvement.  Best of luck with the next one!

Roy


On Aug 5, 2021, at 10:39 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


We have all had multiple telescopes that each had a first light but it is not often you get a chance to first light a new repaired eye. This was the first night, after having the first of two cataract surgeries performed, that I was able to try out a new lens. No not eyepiece; eye lens. It is only a first impression with a limited target, Jupiter, but what a difference in vision at the telescope. The uncorrected eye shows Jupiter as a dull yellow disk. The corrected eye, not my dominant observing eye, shows Jupiter a much brighter white with vivid colors in the bands. There were no bad side effects such as halos or flaring. That was good. Dim stars were much brighter and easier to acquire with the corrected eye. Not having to take glasses on and off for the one power is quite nice.

After decades of observing with you all, Kent, Bird, and the old group, you think it will never change and go on forever just the same as it was 25 years ago. But time marches on at this later life stage and the eyes were wearing out fast. The universe was outlasting me as it always does for everybody. I did not realize how bad I had gotten until we replaced the lens of my eye. The difference is remarkable. So far so good. One eye down, one to go. The primary observing eye is in a couple of weeks. First light is pretty good so far. More to evaluate in the coming months but a good start on a second chance.

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