Date   

Re: Observing M-Objects

Jonathan Scheetz
 

Too funny!  Got me as well. Is there a "C" line for Caldwell objects?


Re: Observing M-Objects

Dr Bruce
 

Kent,

I’m impressed as usual. Keep up that sense of humor.

Dr Bruce

Sent from Dr B's iPad Pro


Re: Observing M-Objects

George Reynolds
 

Kent, I love it! You did especially well on M57 and M101!  :-)

George


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 15:10, preciousmyprecious via groups.io
<preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:
Haha, good one Kent. You had me,... except I was wondering why you were calling them "M" objects and some I thought you somehow miraculously got them through the light pollution. There I go again putting you on a pedestal. 

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 12:16:49 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


After looking at the moon and planets with their telescopes amateur astronomer desire to see other objects. Most all of us like to look for deep sky objects, the better ones called "M" objects. Most are faint but the challenge lies in seeing them. Examples include M 1 (The Crab Nebula), M 5 (a globular cluster in the constellation Serpens), M 57 (The Ring Nebula) and M 31 (The Andromeda Galaxy). Normally a dark sky is required to see these. I was not only able to see them but to also photograph numerous "M" objects during my 3 day visit to Manhattan in NYC. Here is my picture of some New York City M-objects.


Re: Observing M-Objects

preciousmyprecious
 

Haha, good one Kent. You had me,... except I was wondering why you were calling them "M" objects and some I thought you somehow miraculously got them through the light pollution. There I go again putting you on a pedestal. 

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 12:16:49 PM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


After looking at the moon and planets with their telescopes amateur astronomer desire to see other objects. Most all of us like to look for deep sky objects, the better ones called "M" objects. Most are faint but the challenge lies in seeing them. Examples include M 1 (The Crab Nebula), M 5 (a globular cluster in the constellation Serpens), M 57 (The Ring Nebula) and M 31 (The Andromeda Galaxy). Normally a dark sky is required to see these. I was not only able to see them but to also photograph numerous "M" objects during my 3 day visit to Manhattan in NYC. Here is my picture of some New York City M-objects.


Re: Observing M-Objects

charles jagow
 

Have you started the Big-Apple Messier List yet?

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, July 7, 2021 at 10:16 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Observing M-Objects

 

After looking at the moon and planets with their telescopes amateur astronomer desire to see other objects. Most all of us like to look for deep sky objects, the better ones called "M" objects. Most are faint but the challenge lies in seeing them. Examples include M 1 (The Crab Nebula), M 5 (a globular cluster in the constellation Serpens), M 57 (The Ring Nebula) and M 31 (The Andromeda Galaxy). Normally a dark sky is required to see these. I was not only able to see them but to also photograph numerous "M" objects during my 3 day visit to Manhattan in NYC. Here is my picture of some New York City M-objects.


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Observing M-Objects

Kent Blackwell
 

After looking at the moon and planets with their telescopes amateur astronomer desire to see other objects. Most all of us like to look for deep sky objects, the better ones called "M" objects. Most are faint but the challenge lies in seeing them. Examples include M 1 (The Crab Nebula), M 5 (a globular cluster in the constellation Serpens), M 57 (The Ring Nebula) and M 31 (The Andromeda Galaxy). Normally a dark sky is required to see these. I was not only able to see them but to also photograph numerous "M" objects during my 3 day visit to Manhattan in NYC. Here is my picture of some New York City M-objects.


Re: Cooler for the Picnic

Shawn Loescher
 

Yes George. That would be great. Thanks.

Shawn


Re: Milky Way Tour Last Night

George Reynolds
 

Ian, we saw a lot of those same objects Saturday night at Skywatch at Northwest River Park, in various telescopes.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, July 5, 2021, 12:01:00 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


A wonderful evening last night albeit somewhat noisy with all the fireworks going off in the distant. Did a tour through the milky way with my 5 inch triplet. Started at the Veil in Cygnus and then onto Alberio (lovely), the Dumbell Nebula, M71 in Sagitta, Brocchi's Cluster, Wild Duck Cluster in Aquila, M22 in Sagittarius and then across and up through the Lagoon, Trifid, M24, Omega, and Eagle Nebula ... Cheers Ian


Re: Transit

George Reynolds
 

Yes, we all saw it at Skywatch Saturday night.  I pointed it out with my green laser pointer as it moved across the sky, brightening, and then dimming.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Sunday, July 4, 2021, 09:59:55 PM EDT, Matthew Cook via groups.io <lt_mrcook@...> wrote:


Anyone else see the Tianhe-1 transit about 2150?  Looked very similar to an ISS transit.






Re: Cooler for the Picnic

George Reynolds
 

I have a medium-size (about 60 Qt) cooler I can bring.  Do you want me to bring it full of ice too?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Friday, July 2, 2021, 11:54:55 AM EDT, Shawn Loescher <shawn.loescher@...> wrote:


In past years Chuck Jagow generously donated  the use of multiple coolers for the club picnic. I don't think he will be doing that this year so is there anyone who has a large cooler they are willing to bring to the picnic. Ideally we should have about three big coolers there to hold the water, food, and other beverages. I have a medium cooler I can bring. If no one has a big cooler we (the club) can purchase one on the same day I pick up the food. This is a 150qt cooler.


Re: Milky Way Tour Last Night

jimcoble2000
 

We were out doing the same thing Saturday.

On Monday, July 5, 2021, 12:00:59 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


A wonderful evening last night albeit somewhat noisy with all the fireworks going off in the distant. Did a tour through the milky way with my 5 inch triplet. Started at the Veil in Cygnus and then onto Alberio (lovely), the Dumbell Nebula, M71 in Sagitta, Brocchi's Cluster, Wild Duck Cluster in Aquila, M22 in Sagittarius and then across and up through the Lagoon, Trifid, M24, Omega, and Eagle Nebula ... Cheers Ian


Re: Milky Way Tour Last Night

Matthew Cook
 

That’s a nice night of observation…:)


On Jul 5, 2021, at 12:00, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:

A wonderful evening last night albeit somewhat noisy with all the fireworks going off in the distant. Did a tour through the milky way with my 5 inch triplet. Started at the Veil in Cygnus and then onto Alberio (lovely), the Dumbell Nebula, M71 in Sagitta, Brocchi's Cluster, Wild Duck Cluster in Aquila, M22 in Sagittarius and then across and up through the Lagoon, Trifid, M24, Omega, and Eagle Nebula ... Cheers Ian


Milky Way Tour Last Night

Ian Stewart
 

A wonderful evening last night albeit somewhat noisy with all the fireworks going off in the distant. Did a tour through the milky way with my 5 inch triplet. Started at the Veil in Cygnus and then onto Alberio (lovely), the Dumbell Nebula, M71 in Sagitta, Brocchi's Cluster, Wild Duck Cluster in Aquila, M22 in Sagittarius and then across and up through the Lagoon, Trifid, M24, Omega, and Eagle Nebula ... Cheers Ian


Transit

Matthew Cook
 

Anyone else see the Tianhe-1 transit about 2150? Looked very similar to an ISS transit.


Thanks George and Shawn

jimcoble2000
 

We had a nice night out at NWRP. A pleasure to observe with you all.


Re: Cooler for the Picnic

Secretary
 

Ok, I will bring it along..

On July 3, 2021 11:28 AM Shawn Loescher <shawn.loescher@...> wrote:


Thanks Jeff. If you can bring it I would appreciate it. Worse case is we don't need it.

Shawn
Jeffrey Thornton
Secretary,
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers


Re: Cooler for the Picnic

Shawn Loescher
 

Thanks Jeff. If you can bring it I would appreciate it. Worse case is we don't need it.

Shawn


Re: SURVEY - Impact of Large Satellite Constellations on Astronomy

Stu Beaber
 

DONE!

On Fri, Jul 2, 2021 at 11:49 AM Shawn Loescher <shawn.loescher@...> wrote:

As many of you may already know, the occurrence of “satellite constellations” is having a dramatic impact on professional astronomy while also affecting the amateur community. The American Astronomical Society has issued a survey to be completed by enthusiasts of the night sky – from causal stargazers to avid amateurs to professional astronomers – so they can better understand how it affects our society.
Would you please take a few moments to answer a few questions about the important issue of satellite constellations?


Re: SURVEY - Impact of Large Satellite Constellations on Astronomy

Ian Stewart
 

Done

On 7/2/2021 11:49 AM, Shawn Loescher wrote:

As many of you may already know, the occurrence of “satellite constellations” is having a dramatic impact on professional astronomy while also affecting the amateur community. The American Astronomical Society has issued a survey to be completed by enthusiasts of the night sky – from causal stargazers to avid amateurs to professional astronomers – so they can better understand how it affects our society.
Would you please take a few moments to answer a few questions about the important issue of satellite constellations?


Re: SURVEY - Impact of Large Satellite Constellations on Astronomy

galacticprobe
 

Done!

Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: Shawn Loescher <shawn.loescher@...>
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jul 2, 2021 11:49 am
Subject: [BackBayAstro] SURVEY - Impact of Large Satellite Constellations on Astronomy


As many of you may already know, the occurrence of “satellite constellations” is having a dramatic impact on professional astronomy while also affecting the amateur community. The American Astronomical Society has issued a survey to be completed by enthusiasts of the night sky – from causal stargazers to avid amateurs to professional astronomers – so they can better understand how it affects our society.
Would you please take a few moments to answer a few questions about the important issue of satellite constellations?

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