Date   

termination event

Ted Forte
 

Something big may be about to happen on the sun. "We call it the Termination Event," says Scott McIntosh, a solar physicist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), "and it's very, very close to happening."

If you've never heard of the Termination Event, you're not alone.  Many researchers have never heard of it either. It's a relatively new idea in solar physics championed by McIntosh and colleague Bob Leamon of the University of Maryland - Baltimore County. According to the two scientists, vast bands of magnetism are drifting across the surface of the sun. When oppositely-charged bands collide at the equator, they annihilate (or "terminate"). There's no explosion; this is magnetism, not anti-matter. Nevertheless, the Termination Event is a big deal. It can kickstart the next solar cycle into a higher gear.

"If the Terminator Event happens soon, as we expect, new Solar Cycle 25 could have a magnitude that rivals the top few since record-keeping began," says McIntosh.

More via SpaceWeather

 


Re: Warp Drive Advances

Roy Diffrient
 

Hi Richard,
Yeah, as you say, astronauts need protection from space junk now and it will be vastly more important at warp speed.  That must be developed for warp drive to be useful – but I have faith.

I also found a free version of the Lentz paper referenced, “Breaking the Warp Barrier ... “ on the arXiv preprint server:


Caution, very heavy math.

Roy


On Jun 11, 2021, at 11:57 AM, Richard Saunders <rsaun58043@...> wrote:

Interesting, thanks for passing Roy.  Great stuff to think about.  I certainly believe achieving light speed or thereabouts is possible.  The problem I see, however, even at the relatively low speed of orbital velocity, i.e., ~17,000 mph, is that sooner or later a small piece of space dust, rocks, debris or whatever, will strike the spacecraft and either seriously damage or destroy it.  It doesn't have to be big to transfer destructive energy to the craft as per Einstein's E=MC².  We don't have material that could stand the impact and likely never will.  To survive space travel at high speeds a spacecraft would have to have some type of force field and that's something I think is not likely to be developed.  
Regards,
Scott


Re: Warp Drive Advances

Richard Saunders
 

Interesting, thanks for passing Roy.  Great stuff to think about.  I certainly believe achieving light speed or thereabouts is possible.  The problem I see, however, even at the relatively low speed of orbital velocity, i.e., ~17,000 mph, is that sooner or later a small piece of space dust, rocks, debris or whatever, will strike the spacecraft and either seriously damage or destroy it.  It doesn't have to be big to transfer destructive energy to the craft as per Einstein's E=MC².  We don't have material that could stand the impact and likely never will.  To survive space travel at high speeds a spacecraft would have to have some type of force field and that's something I think is not likely to be developed.  
Regards,
Scott


Warp Drive Advances

Roy Diffrient
 

Are we there yet?  Here’s a no-math, easy-read summary:


Re: One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

Jim Tallman
 

Thanks Chuck.

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

charles jagow
 

 

Great image!

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Jim Tallman <jctallman@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Thursday, June 10, 2021 at 3:17 PM
To: "BackBayAstro@groups.io" <BackBayAstro@groups.io>, "Lawrence W. Taylor III" <birdtaylor@...>, VPAS <vpas@groups.io>, Kent Blackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>, "Kurt.Melow@..." <kurt.melow@...>, "dandd4bb@..." <dandd4bb@...>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

 

My view from Ocean View :)

 

Not freezing like 2013!!!!

 

Image

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android

 


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 10, 2021, 07:18
To: BBAA-Group; Lawrence W. Taylor III; VPAS; kentblackwell; Roy Diffrient; Ted Forte; Kurt.Melow@...; dandd4bb@...
Subject: [BackBayAstro] One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

 

Magnificent is about the sum of it. Weather was making things dodgy but there were breaks in the clouds at 0430 when I got up. I had packed the car the previous night with the 20x80 big binoculars and my Baader solar filters.

After a 45 minute drive down to the boat ramp in Back Bay I arrived as the sky was getting lighter. Huge changes have taken place and spell the doom of the houses back there and eventually the boat ramp. Water is no a permanent feature on the roads and yards due to sea level rise. There has been no winds the past days so this was not a wind tide event it is the new normal. It has been 25 years since I have lived down there and the change is remarkable as the situation becomes more untenable.

 

After parking I set up my chair and binocular tripod by 0630. There were gaps in the clouds though there was a solid cloud line at the horizon. This was changing slowly so it was a race between the sun and the gaps. It was a spectacular sunrise as the gap got more and more orange and intense with the rising sun. The cloud tops were vermilion in color. The only thing I can compare it to is the classic sunrise in the desert scene from the movie Lawrence of Arabia. It was that good. David Lean would have tears in his eyes.

 

I started watching the gap a split second before the sun cleared the clouds, I was rewarded with my first ever view of the green flash. As the sun rose it looked like a rhino horn with the moon covering more of the face than i thought it would. As this was at low altitude I could see the reflection of the water waves off back bay, the dark outline in Sandbridge, wisps of clouds and that astounding sight of thew eclipsed moon rising as if through a wide screen frame of a Cinerama movie. The gap was wide enough to see the entire sun as it rose into the next thin layer of clouds. Then the sun repeated the jaw dropping show through the next layer before slowly disappearing into the solid clouds above. All this took 15 minutes but what a 15 minutes! Cue the sound track to Lawrence.

 

The circumstance conspired to make this so beautiful and memorable with the setting and the effect of cloud water, land, and eclipse against a dead black background sky. I am not sure film could capture the scene. Only 15 minutes but one for the books. It is always worth going to on the chance the magic may happen.

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

Kent Blackwell
 

Beautiful, and how true!


On Jun 10, 2021, at 5:17 PM, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:

My view from Ocean View :)

Not freezing like 2013!!!!

<processed.jpeg>


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 10, 2021, 07:18
To: BBAA-Group; Lawrence W. Taylor III; VPAS; kentblackwell; Roy Diffrient; Ted Forte; Kurt.Melow@...; dandd4bb@...
Subject: [BackBayAstro] One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

Magnificent is about the sum of it. Weather was making things dodgy but there were breaks in the clouds at 0430 when I got up. I had packed the car the previous night with the 20x80 big binoculars and my Baader solar filters.
After a 45 minute drive down to the boat ramp in Back Bay I arrived as the sky was getting lighter. Huge changes have taken place and spell the doom of the houses back there and eventually the boat ramp. Water is no a permanent feature on the roads and yards due to sea level rise. There has been no winds the past days so this was not a wind tide event it is the new normal. It has been 25 years since I have lived down there and the change is remarkable as the situation becomes more untenable.

After parking I set up my chair and binocular tripod by 0630. There were gaps in the clouds though there was a solid cloud line at the horizon. This was changing slowly so it was a race between the sun and the gaps. It was a spectacular sunrise as the gap got more and more orange and intense with the rising sun. The cloud tops were vermilion in color. The only thing I can compare it to is the classic sunrise in the desert scene from the movie Lawrence of Arabia. It was that good. David Lean would have tears in his eyes.

I started watching the gap a split second before the sun cleared the clouds, I was rewarded with my first ever view of the green flash. As the sun rose it looked like a rhino horn with the moon covering more of the face than i thought it would. As this was at low altitude I could see the reflection of the water waves off back bay, the dark outline in Sandbridge, wisps of clouds and that astounding sight of thew eclipsed moon rising as if through a wide screen frame of a Cinerama movie. The gap was wide enough to see the entire sun as it rose into the next thin layer of clouds. Then the sun repeated the jaw dropping show through the next layer before slowly disappearing into the solid clouds above. All this took 15 minutes but what a 15 minutes! Cue the sound track to Lawrence.

The circumstance conspired to make this so beautiful and memorable with the setting and the effect of cloud water, land, and eclipse against a dead black background sky. I am not sure film could capture the scene. Only 15 minutes but one for the books. It is always worth going to on the chance the magic may happen.


Re: One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

Jim Tallman
 

My view from Ocean View :)

Not freezing like 2013!!!!

Image


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 10, 2021, 07:18
To: BBAA-Group; Lawrence W. Taylor III; VPAS; kentblackwell; Roy Diffrient; Ted Forte; Kurt.Melow@...; dandd4bb@...
Subject: [BackBayAstro] One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

Magnificent is about the sum of it. Weather was making things dodgy but there were breaks in the clouds at 0430 when I got up. I had packed the car the previous night with the 20x80 big binoculars and my Baader solar filters.
After a 45 minute drive down to the boat ramp in Back Bay I arrived as the sky was getting lighter. Huge changes have taken place and spell the doom of the houses back there and eventually the boat ramp. Water is no a permanent feature on the roads and yards due to sea level rise. There has been no winds the past days so this was not a wind tide event it is the new normal. It has been 25 years since I have lived down there and the change is remarkable as the situation becomes more untenable.

After parking I set up my chair and binocular tripod by 0630. There were gaps in the clouds though there was a solid cloud line at the horizon. This was changing slowly so it was a race between the sun and the gaps. It was a spectacular sunrise as the gap got more and more orange and intense with the rising sun. The cloud tops were vermilion in color. The only thing I can compare it to is the classic sunrise in the desert scene from the movie Lawrence of Arabia. It was that good. David Lean would have tears in his eyes.

I started watching the gap a split second before the sun cleared the clouds, I was rewarded with my first ever view of the green flash. As the sun rose it looked like a rhino horn with the moon covering more of the face than i thought it would. As this was at low altitude I could see the reflection of the water waves off back bay, the dark outline in Sandbridge, wisps of clouds and that astounding sight of thew eclipsed moon rising as if through a wide screen frame of a Cinerama movie. The gap was wide enough to see the entire sun as it rose into the next thin layer of clouds. Then the sun repeated the jaw dropping show through the next layer before slowly disappearing into the solid clouds above. All this took 15 minutes but what a 15 minutes! Cue the sound track to Lawrence.

The circumstance conspired to make this so beautiful and memorable with the setting and the effect of cloud water, land, and eclipse against a dead black background sky. I am not sure film could capture the scene. Only 15 minutes but one for the books. It is always worth going to on the chance the magic may happen.


Our mention in today's Virginia Pilot

Jeffrey Thornton
 


Re: Eclipse Event Photos

Ted Forte
 

What eclipse?

 

It all took place with the sun well below our horizon from here in Arizona. Glad you got to see it and very glad you got to share it!

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Shawn Loescher
Sent: Thursday, June 10, 2021 4:37 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Eclipse Event Photos

 

Seeing the eclipse this morning was great but participating in an outreach event with other members was even better. The first two photos of the eclipse are ones that Leigh Anne took.


Eclipse Event Photos

Shawn Loescher
 

Seeing the eclipse this morning was great but participating in an outreach event with other members was even better. The first two photos of the eclipse are ones that Leigh Anne took.


Partial Solar Eclipse at Sunrise

Kent Blackwell
 

Despite the prediction of clouds and even a possible rain shower the morning of June 10 we were treated to a clearing to witness the partial solar eclipse at sunrise. We were lucky to at least get a glimpse standing along the Oceanfront in Virginia Beach, VA. Several Back Bay Amateur Astronomers gathered along the Boardwalk in hopes of glimpsing the eclipsed sun. I didn't have a telescope, just a Nikon P610 point-and-shoot camera. We are all so fortunate to see such a beautiful sight. The sun was eclipsed 68.2%.


Re: One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

Kent Blackwell
 

Indeed it was beautiful. As beautiful as the 2013 & 2014 eclipses, both like this one occurred near the  horizon.


One for the books. The most dramatic partial eclipse I have seen.

jimcoble2000
 

Magnificent is about the sum of it. Weather was making things dodgy but there were breaks in the clouds at 0430 when I got up. I had packed the car the previous night with the 20x80 big binoculars and my Baader solar filters.
After a 45 minute drive down to the boat ramp in Back Bay I arrived as the sky was getting lighter. Huge changes have taken place and spell the doom of the houses back there and eventually the boat ramp. Water is no a permanent feature on the roads and yards due to sea level rise. There has been no winds the past days so this was not a wind tide event it is the new normal. It has been 25 years since I have lived down there and the change is remarkable as the situation becomes more untenable.

After parking I set up my chair and binocular tripod by 0630. There were gaps in the clouds though there was a solid cloud line at the horizon. This was changing slowly so it was a race between the sun and the gaps. It was a spectacular sunrise as the gap got more and more orange and intense with the rising sun. The cloud tops were vermilion in color. The only thing I can compare it to is the classic sunrise in the desert scene from the movie Lawrence of Arabia. It was that good. David Lean would have tears in his eyes.

I started watching the gap a split second before the sun cleared the clouds, I was rewarded with my first ever view of the green flash. As the sun rose it looked like a rhino horn with the moon covering more of the face than i thought it would. As this was at low altitude I could see the reflection of the water waves off back bay, the dark outline in Sandbridge, wisps of clouds and that astounding sight of thew eclipsed moon rising as if through a wide screen frame of a Cinerama movie. The gap was wide enough to see the entire sun as it rose into the next thin layer of clouds. Then the sun repeated the jaw dropping show through the next layer before slowly disappearing into the solid clouds above. All this took 15 minutes but what a 15 minutes! Cue the sound track to Lawrence.

The circumstance conspired to make this so beautiful and memorable with the setting and the effect of cloud water, land, and eclipse against a dead black background sky. I am not sure film could capture the scene. Only 15 minutes but one for the books. It is always worth going to on the chance the magic may happen.


Re: Solar report

charles jagow
 

Saw and imaged them both

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at 7:18 AM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Solar report

 

The partial eclipse is Thursday morning from sunrise until 6:25am EDT. Unless it's raining (some have predicted so) Robert Hitt and I plan to be on the boardwalk. 
There are a small group of sunspots working their way westward to they should be visible in telescopes during the entire eclipse. 
In H-alpha light a tall prominence is currently visible. 

Who remembers seeing partial eclipses at both the 2013 and 2014 ECSP? Wow, that was really special. One was at sunrise, the other at sunset. Attached are two reduced file pictures I took of both events. 

Kent


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Solar report

Jim Tallman
 

Freezing our butts off! 😎

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: BOARDWALK ASTRONOMY IS BACK ON!!!

charles jagow
 

YAY!

 

My favorite outreach continues!!!

Aw Crap, I am 2,000 from the boardwalk!

 

ENJOY you guys!

 

I am trying to get permission to arbitrarily do sidewalk solar astronomy here in town.  Have to have permission of the store front and/or city manager/mayor.

 

 

 

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Shawn Loescher <shawn.loescher@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at 5:50 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] BOARDWALK ASTRONOMY IS BACK ON!!!

 

Good news. Chuck emailed me tonight after receiving word from Mike at IMGoing Events that Boardwalk Astronomy is back on starting this month! See you there!

SPECIAL NOTE:
Club members are not permitted to drive on the boardwalk until they have a parking pass issued to them AND hanging from their vehicle rear view mirror. The club will be issued 6 boardwalk parking passes and we are allowed 6 parking spots next to the 24th Street stage for each Boardwalk Astronomy event.


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Do you remember March 7?

George Reynolds
 

Hey Bird, I just saw this email from back in March,  I too had some of the nicknames you had.  I am also very nearsighted, and have worn glasses since the second grade.  My best friend gave me the nicknames "four-eyes", "specs", and "goggles".  Later, because I was a "brain" in school, he gave me the nickname "birdbrain", which later got shortened to "birdie".  None of those nicknames ever stuck, though, like yours did.

George



George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Monday, March 8, 2021, 12:25:08 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Mark,


No, I'm very nearsighted... -18 diopters. When we moved from the California desert to the Virginia coast when I was thirteen, I had to wear my glasses instead of my preferred contact lenses until new ones could be made. Classmates would tease me with typical nicknames like Coke bottles and four eyes. Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and Woodstock were very popular comic characters way back then. Well, a good buddy took notice on how small my eyes looked due to my VERY thick glasses, and came up with Birdie in reference to Woodstock's pin-point eyes and the fact that I loved making and flying model airplanes and rockets. Since I'm also the third with my family name, I'd had many nicknames my whole life up to that point, and I loved my new name: Birdie. Fast forward to adulthood, marriage, and professional life, where I shortened it to Bird. My wife, Judy, thought that it would sound more professional... tee-tee.


So to finally answer your question, Mark, no, but "Birdie" was given to me at that time. Sorry for the long answer, AstroBuddy.


Clear Dark Skies,

Bird

On March 8, 2021 at 8:09 AM "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

 
Is that where the "Bird" moniker comes from? Emoji

On Sunday, March 7, 2021, 3:54:30 PM EST, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:


Hey Kent,

My dad took us three kids to watch it on the oceanfront. I loved watching the birds as the sunlight dimmed and later brightened.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Mar 7, 2021, at 15:09 00, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

If you're one of the older folks in the club how could you possibly forget March 7, 1970 the day of the center path of totality of the sun traversed through the middle of our town? I viewed it from Rudee Inlet at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront with a 8" f/7 Optical Craftsmen Newtonian telescope on a Cave Optical Co. equatorial mount. And what a fine telescope that was, too. I was too naïve at the time to know just how good the mirror in that telescope was. However, I shall never forget the view of a totally eclipsed sun on a perfectly clear sky day. After witnessing such a spectacle it became a lifelong challenge to follow total eclipses around the world. 

Kent Blackwell

 


 


 


Re: Solar report

George Reynolds
 

I vividly remember the one at sunrise at ECSP.  We were all lined up at the edge of the Sound, watching the partial eclipse.


George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, June 9, 2021, 09:18:37 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


The partial eclipse is Thursday morning from sunrise until 6:25am EDT. Unless it's raining (some have predicted so) Robert Hitt and I plan to be on the boardwalk. 
There are a small group of sunspots working their way westward to they should be visible in telescopes during the entire eclipse. 
In H-alpha light a tall prominence is currently visible. 

Who remembers seeing partial eclipses at both the 2013 and 2014 ECSP? Wow, that was really special. One was at sunrise, the other at sunset. Attached are two reduced file pictures I took of both events. 

Kent


Solar report

Kent Blackwell
 

The partial eclipse is Thursday morning from sunrise until 6:25am EDT. Unless it's raining (some have predicted so) Robert Hitt and I plan to be on the boardwalk. 
There are a small group of sunspots working their way westward to they should be visible in telescopes during the entire eclipse. 
In H-alpha light a tall prominence is currently visible. 

Who remembers seeing partial eclipses at both the 2013 and 2014 ECSP? Wow, that was really special. One was at sunrise, the other at sunset. Attached are two reduced file pictures I took of both events. 

Kent

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