Date   

Re: S&T Author series

charles jagow
 

Great Interview TED!

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, March 1, 2021 at 12:36 PM
To: <tedforte511@...>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] S&T Author series

 

I was interviewed by Frank Timmes of the AAS on my current S&T article as part of a series on S&T authors.  

 

I was encouraged to share it widely.   If anyone would like to see the interview it’s here:

https://youtu.be/zyMi5WzacZg

 

Please be kind.  This was done off the cuff with no preparation, and looks like it. It’s about 45 minutes long  and some of it might not be suitable for all viewers (LOL).

 

Ted

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Richard Saunders
 

Awesome review Ted, thank!  Now on my wish list!
R,
Scott


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Ted Forte
 

I went out right after dark and completed these  tests by 9pm.  Moonrise was at 10:13pm

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 9:06 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

 

Thanks for the review Ted.  The moon was pretty bright here last night – was it up when you were doing these comparisons?  Would you say the moon had any effect on the views with the various filters?



On Mar 3, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Ian Stewart
 

Thanks Ted, informative as always ... Ian

On 3/3/2021 10:32 AM, Ted Forte wrote:

I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Roy Diffrient
 

Thanks for the review Ted.  The moon was pretty bright here last night – was it up when you were doing these comparisons?  Would you say the moon had any effect on the views with the various filters?


On Mar 3, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Ted Forte
 

I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Re: S&T Author series

Kent Blackwell
 

I think it's a fun interview, at least what I've seen so far. I'm going to put on you my 65" Samsung/Apple TV to get the full impact. Congratulations on the interview. 

Kent


S&T Author series

Ted Forte
 

I was interviewed by Frank Timmes of the AAS on my current S&T article as part of a series on S&T authors.  

 

I was encouraged to share it widely.   If anyone would like to see the interview it’s here:

https://youtu.be/zyMi5WzacZg

 

Please be kind.  This was done off the cuff with no preparation, and looks like it. It’s about 45 minutes long  and some of it might not be suitable for all viewers (LOL).

 

Ted

 


Re: A new Vixen eyepeice

Ted Forte
 

Lucky you Ian – my eyes barely make it to 3mm – scotch or no scotch.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Stewart
Sent: Monday, March 1, 2021 9:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] A new Vixen eyepeice

 

20mm would be wasted on my poor old eyes - 6mm if I'm lucky and haven't had a scotch.

On 3/1/2021 11:36 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:

Vixen Optics has a new eyepiece; a 100mm focal length. Wow, no kidding! That would be 35x in my 25" f/5, or 12x in my Orion 10" f/4., both yielding a 20mm exit pupil. Anyone out there have pupils that open to 20mm? Let me know if so. 
Check it out on the B& H Photo site, 79 bucks shipped.. I broke up laughing at the apparent field of view spec. You've got to hand it to Vixen, the same company that brought you a 1.6mm focal length eyepiece (2187x in the 25") now brings you a 100mm.

Kent


Re: A new Vixen eyepeice

Jeffrey Thornton
 

I think I will stick with the telrad....lol


Re: A new Vixen eyepeice

Ian Stewart
 

20mm would be wasted on my poor old eyes - 6mm if I'm lucky and haven't had a scotch.

On 3/1/2021 11:36 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Vixen Optics has a new eyepiece; a 100mm focal length. Wow, no kidding! That would be 35x in my 25" f/5, or 12x in my Orion 10" f/4., both yielding a 20mm exit pupil. Anyone out there have pupils that open to 20mm? Let me know if so. 
Check it out on the B& H Photo site, 79 bucks shipped.. I broke up laughing at the apparent field of view spec. You've got to hand it to Vixen, the same company that brought you a 1.6mm focal length eyepiece (2187x in the 25") now brings you a 100mm.

Kent


A new Vixen eyepeice

Kent Blackwell
 

Vixen Optics has a new eyepiece; a 100mm focal length. Wow, no kidding! That would be 35x in my 25" f/5, or 12x in my Orion 10" f/4., both yielding a 20mm exit pupil. Anyone out there have pupils that open to 20mm? Let me know if so. 
Check it out on the B& H Photo site, 79 bucks shipped.. I broke up laughing at the apparent field of view spec. You've got to hand it to Vixen, the same company that brought you a 1.6mm focal length eyepiece (2187x in the 25") now brings you a 100mm.

Kent


Re: Saturday SUN Day Cancelled

Roy Diffrient
 

Too bad – Space Weather says there’s a nice sunspot grouping, for a change, that has doubled in size in 24 hours and is easily visible.

Roy


On Feb 26, 2021, at 11:20 AM, George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


Due to the forecasts for rain and clouds, tomorrow's Saturday SUN Day has been cancelled.  I checked WAVY weather, Weather.com, Accuweather, and the Clear Sky Chart, and they all agree that we would not be able to see the Sun, so -- boohoo! -- we scrubbed tomorrow's Sun observing.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Saturday SUN Day Cancelled

George Reynolds
 

Due to the forecasts for rain and clouds, tomorrow's Saturday SUN Day has been cancelled.  I checked WAVY weather, Weather.com, Accuweather, and the Clear Sky Chart, and they all agree that we would not be able to see the Sun, so -- boohoo! -- we scrubbed tomorrow's Sun observing.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Wallops Launch set for 12:36pm Saturday 2/20

Kent Blackwell
 

I rode my bicycle to a nearby area with a clear horizon.  I knew exactly where to look because I’ve seen other rockets from that location.  The sky was mostly clear except a few white puffy clouds in that direction. I could not see it, but a friend of mine in Chesapeake did. He saw a yellow-orange plume for a couple of seconds. 


Re: Wallops Launch set for 12:36pm Saturday 2/20

Roy Diffrient
 

Temporal vortex!

 

Roy

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Jim Tallman
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 7:03 PM
To: BackBayAstro
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Wallops Launch set for 12:36pm Saturday 2/20

 

Lol you were 6 minutes late!

 

 

On Feb 20, 2021 at 12:42, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

Antares rocket, ISS resupply mission.  On NASA TV and Space.com.



Roy










 

 

 


Re: Wallops Launch set for 12:36pm Saturday 2/20

Jim Tallman
 

Lol you were 6 minutes late!


On Feb 20, 2021 at 12:42, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

Antares rocket, ISS resupply mission.  On NASA TV and Space.com.


Roy







Re: Wallops Launch set for 12:36pm Saturday 2/20

jimcoble2000
 

Clouds....................Clouds

On Saturday, February 20, 2021, 12:13:09 PM EST, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Antares rocket, ISS resupply mission.  On NASA TV and Space.com.

Roy






Wallops Launch set for 12:36pm Saturday 2/20

Roy Diffrient
 

Antares rocket, ISS resupply mission. On NASA TV and Space.com.

Roy


Re: More about Mars Rover 2020

Dale Carey
 

And this rover is a monster compared to the others
Dale


-----Original Message-----
From: George Reynolds via groups.io <pathfinder027@...>
To: BBAA-Group <backbayastro@groups.io>; Heidi Dewey <virginiagardengal@...>; Samantha Burris <samisriley@...>; Chloe Reynolds <chloereynolds294@...>
Sent: Thu, Feb 18, 2021 1:10 pm
Subject: [BackBayAstro] More about Mars Rover 2020

Mars Perseverance Landing Party (Today!),
Explorations! Friday AM (Tomorrow!)


Landing Party today for the Rover. 
Landing Party!
 
Mars Perseverance Rover Lands on Mars!
 
Thursday, February 18 (Today!)
3:15 PM (EST)



 
Join us to view and chat about the landing (and 7 minutes of terror) of the Mars Perseverance rover. The Rockville Science Center will be joined by the Gaithersburg Community Museum.
 
Perseverance is a car-sized Mars robot designed to explore the Jezero crater on Mars as part of NASA's Mars mission. It carries several cameras and two microphones. The rover is accompanied by the helicopter Ingenuity, which will help Perseverance to scout for locations to study.
 
This will be a casual social event with a moderator. Just science-minded people chatting online about everything astronomical as we enjoy and share a little piece of history with each other.
 
We don't schedule the launch. Just the party. If landing is canceled while we are online, we will still chat a bit and reschedule the party to the next landing date/time.




George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 

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