Date   

Re: Clear skies ahead

Ian Stewart
 

Hey Kent, great list given the viewing conditions. What scope were you using ... Cheers Ian


Clear skies ahead

Kent Blackwell
 

It looks like we're in for some clear skies the next week. Last night was no exception. Despite my severe light pollution (18.5 SQM-L) there are still a lot of objects to see. Here's what I observed last night. I always love seeing NGC 2022, a planetary nebula in Orion not many people visit, probably because so much attention is paid to M 42.

List: 21/03/05 25��� VB

Messier 78
(Bright Nebula in Orion)

Flame Nebula - NGC 2024
(Bright Nebula in Orion)

Trapezium - Theta1 Ori
(Variable Double Star in Orion)

NGC 1999
(Bright Nebula in Orion)

NGC 1981
(Open Cluster in Orion)

NGC 1788
(Bright Nebula in Orion)

NGC 2022
(Planetary Nebula in Orion)

NGC 2169
(Open Cluster in Orion)

NGC 2194
(Open Cluster in Orion)

NGC 2141
(Open Cluster in Orion)

Lower's Nebula - Sh 2-261
(Bright Nebula in Orion)

NGC 2174
(Bright Nebula in Orion)

Messier 35
(Open Cluster in Gemini)

NGC 2158
(Open Cluster in Gemini)

IC 2157
(Open Cluster in Gemini)

Messier 41
(Open Cluster in Canis Major)

Omicron1 Canis Majoris
(Variable Star in Canis Major)

NGC 2354
(Open Cluster in Canis Major)

NGC 2362
(Open Cluster in Canis Major)

NGC 2367
(Open Cluster in Canis Major)

Messier 67
(Open Cluster in Cancer)

Beehive Cluster - M 44
(Open Cluster in Cancer)

NGC 2775
(Spiral Galaxy in Cancer)

Spindle Galaxy - NGC 3115
(Elliptical Galaxy in Sextans)

NGC 3166
(Spiral Galaxy in Sextans)

NGC 3169
(Spiral Galaxy in Sextans)

NGC 3412
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

Messier 105
(Elliptical Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3371
(Elliptical Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3373
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3377
(Elliptical Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3367
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

Messier 96
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

Messier 95
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3640
(Elliptical Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3521
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3640
(Elliptical Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3593
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

Messier 66
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

Messier 65
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)

NGC 3628
(Spiral Galaxy in Leo)


FW: "What the AAVSO means to me," March edition

Richard W Roberts
 

This is good stuff. I watched this presentation at the AAVSO annual meeting, along with several other student presnetations. The future is bright with so many highschool kids already doing more advanced projects than I was able to do in college.

 

 

From: AAVSO [mailto:aavso@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 4, 2021 6:12 PM
To: Richard W Roberts <Richard.W.Roberts@...>
Subject: "What the AAVSO means to me," March edition

 

Solis McCain and Nolan Sottoway plotted their light curve data using  AAVSO's VStar software. (Image from their presentation, "Photometric Observations of  XX Cygni" with Rich Berry at AAVSO's 109th Annual Meeting, November 15, 2020. You can view their presentation, which begins at video time 1:46:33). 

To my fellow astronomy enthusiast,
 
Last summer, I mentored two students at the Pine Mountain Observatory Summer Student Workshop. But this year, with COVID restrictions in place, we had an oxymoron: a remote hands-on observing project!
 
With the aid of the AAVSO, the students had immediate access to charts of comparison stars and lots of material about observing. They completed their study by submitting their data to AAVSO, an organization that verifies and curates such data into databases for use by professional astronomers.
 
This assurance that our work becomes available to anyone, professional or not, who needs it—is crucial in the motivation we all need to pursue our astronomical passions. And that's what the AAVSO means to me: through the AAVSO, each and every one of us can make a real contribution to astronomy.
 
Over the course of the workshop, my students and I met, discussed, and observed via Zoom sessions. This sounds a bit crazy, but it worked. The kids operated my telescope remotely, and watched images come in and get saved to Dropbox. Each night yielded 2,000 to 2,500 new images. The next morning, Nolan, one of the students, extracted magnitudes from the images, and the other student, Sol, plotted the numbers and derived the times of maximum light. In the end, they determined 23 accurate times of maximum light.
 
My two students prepared a talk for the other kids at the summer workshop, but the real thrill was giving an oral presentation at the 2020 AAVSO 109th Annual Meeting. In a year when everything was distanced and remote, the AAVSO supported Nolan and Sol in making their contribution to astronomy real and immediate. Your AAVSO membership dues are important. Whether you are an observer or not, please either become a member or renew your membership today—your dues support the AAVSO providing the tools, opportunities, and encouragement that enable each of us to make a real contribution to astronomy.
 
Sincerely,
 
  Rich Berry
  AAVSO 2nd Vice President

 

Follow on Twitter   |   Friend on Facebook   |   Forward to a Friend

Copyright © 2021 American Association of Variable Star Observers, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in to communications from the AAVSO.
Our mailing address is:

American Association of Variable Star Observers

49 Bay State Rd

Cambridge, MA 02138-1203


Add us to your address book



Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp


BBAA March 4, 2021 Meeting Recording

Jeff Goldstein
 

Topic: BBAA

Date: Mar 4, 2021 04:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

 

Meeting Recording:

https://vccs.zoom.us/rec/share/HL7T0qCIeq-U3bFPtfSHdB2gY20HQD4mw07OwM0F_BMiglJ_twkhnA9q8gI9FK0o.B_gMvRlLU9MUfPXV

 

Access Passcode: BBAA-03/4

 

Enjoy, y’all

 

Jeff G.


Re: M105 and friends

Jim Tallman
 

Very nice Ian!
.

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


M105 and friends

Ian Stewart
 

Finally a clear night with no moon till late. Managed a few hours on M105 and some of its companions in the Leo I Group.
Cheers
Ian
M105


BBAA Meeting tonight

George Reynolds
 

BBAA Meeting tonight via Zoom. All are welcome to tune in and join the discussion. After the business portion of the meeting, we will be talking about the recent Mars 2020 rover landing on the Red planet Mars. Here is the link:
Join Zoom Meeting

https://vccs.zoom.us/j/96840800899

Meeting ID: 968 4080 0899

George

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Bruce
 

Gosh Ted, how did you know we needed even more Astro Stuff? 🤣🤣

Dr Bruce

Sent from Dr B's iPad Pro


Weather looks good for Friday Cornland observing

Jonathan Scheetz
 

The weather is finally looking good for some observing at Cornland and I'm looking forward to some dark site viewing.


Re: S&T Author series

charles jagow
 

Great Interview TED!

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, March 1, 2021 at 12:36 PM
To: <tedforte511@...>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] S&T Author series

 

I was interviewed by Frank Timmes of the AAS on my current S&T article as part of a series on S&T authors.  

 

I was encouraged to share it widely.   If anyone would like to see the interview it’s here:

https://youtu.be/zyMi5WzacZg

 

Please be kind.  This was done off the cuff with no preparation, and looks like it. It’s about 45 minutes long  and some of it might not be suitable for all viewers (LOL).

 

Ted

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Richard Saunders
 

Awesome review Ted, thank!  Now on my wish list!
R,
Scott


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Ted Forte
 

I went out right after dark and completed these  tests by 9pm.  Moonrise was at 10:13pm

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 9:06 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

 

Thanks for the review Ted.  The moon was pretty bright here last night – was it up when you were doing these comparisons?  Would you say the moon had any effect on the views with the various filters?



On Mar 3, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Ian Stewart
 

Thanks Ted, informative as always ... Ian

On 3/3/2021 10:32 AM, Ted Forte wrote:

I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Re: Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Roy Diffrient
 

Thanks for the review Ted.  The moon was pretty bright here last night – was it up when you were doing these comparisons?  Would you say the moon had any effect on the views with the various filters?


On Mar 3, 2021, at 10:38 AM, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Lumicon's new Gen III OIII filter

Ted Forte
 

I was able to A-B test the new Lumicon OIII Gen III filter last night (2-inch) against my earlier version Lumicon OIII and an Orion Ultrablock.  I was using my 18-inch Dob.  It is definitely a nice filter and performed very well. There is a noticeable, if not remarkable, improvement over the old filter.

NGC 1514 (PN Tau) is an object that really benefits from a filter.  I could definitely see an improvement with the Gen III.  I first tried it with 87x (35mm Televue Panoptic).  The background sky appeared blacker and the nebula’s contrast in the new filter was noticeably better than the old OIII.  I couldn’t quite decide my preference between the Gen III and the Ultrablock, but if pushed would award the ribbon to the Gen III.  I compared them both by inserting each filter into my TeleVue Paracorr but also did quick comparisons by blinking the filters by hand.   At 197x  (12mm Type 4 Nagler) I thought the Gen III was the best of the three.  My results with NGC 2346 (PN Mon), NGC 2022 (PN Ori) and NGC 2359 (BN CMa) were similar – the Gen III outperformed the original OIII a bit and the Ultrablock slightly.  Unfortunately, I did not compare the Gen III to the UHC which has always been my filter of choice for Thor’s Helmet (2359) – but I just might be changing my mind about that.  The view in the Gen III was hard to beat.

I also tried all three filters on IC 418 (PN Lep) and M97 (PN UMa) to see what I thought about their performance on objects that don’t need a filter, but that do respond to them. I couldn’t really award a winner (I much prefer the unfiltered view of both).

So, to anyone looking for my recommendation, here it is.  If you do not own an OIII filter, now is the time to buy one and I don’t think you could go wrong with the Lumicon Gen III. If you already own an OIII, I think you’ll find a marginal improvement in the new one.  Lumicon set out to improve the quality of an already good filter and I think they succeeded. Whether the degree of improvement justifies the expenditure is a personal matter.  I’d assign a “nice to have” rather than a “must have” score. I’m happy that I bought mine – I use filters a lot and these old eyes need all the help they can get.  Even a few percent improvement was worth the $200 (for the 2-inch – the 1.25 is $100).

Ted

 

P.S. An FYI to those that are unfamiliar: Visual narrowband filters like the OIII (spoken “oh-three”) block most of the visual spectrum and allow only a narrow range of wavelengths through to your eye.  This has the effect of making nebulae appear brighter because the contrast is so radically improved.  Natural skyglow, artificial light pollution bands and a significant portion of the stellar spectrum are effectively blocked.  The OIII passes light in a narrow band about 10-12 nanometers wide centered around 500nm.  The two strongest emission lines in planetary nebulae come from the recombination of doubly ionized oxygen atoms which produce light at 496nm and 501nm.  According to the test data provided, this new Gen III filter passes 98.6081% of the light emitted at 496nm and 98.5658% of the light emitted at 501nm and transmits significantly less than 1% at all wavelengths outside of its design bandpass.


Re: S&T Author series

Kent Blackwell
 

I think it's a fun interview, at least what I've seen so far. I'm going to put on you my 65" Samsung/Apple TV to get the full impact. Congratulations on the interview. 

Kent


S&T Author series

Ted Forte
 

I was interviewed by Frank Timmes of the AAS on my current S&T article as part of a series on S&T authors.  

 

I was encouraged to share it widely.   If anyone would like to see the interview it’s here:

https://youtu.be/zyMi5WzacZg

 

Please be kind.  This was done off the cuff with no preparation, and looks like it. It’s about 45 minutes long  and some of it might not be suitable for all viewers (LOL).

 

Ted

 


Re: A new Vixen eyepeice

Ted Forte
 

Lucky you Ian – my eyes barely make it to 3mm – scotch or no scotch.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Stewart
Sent: Monday, March 1, 2021 9:47 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] A new Vixen eyepeice

 

20mm would be wasted on my poor old eyes - 6mm if I'm lucky and haven't had a scotch.

On 3/1/2021 11:36 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:

Vixen Optics has a new eyepiece; a 100mm focal length. Wow, no kidding! That would be 35x in my 25" f/5, or 12x in my Orion 10" f/4., both yielding a 20mm exit pupil. Anyone out there have pupils that open to 20mm? Let me know if so. 
Check it out on the B& H Photo site, 79 bucks shipped.. I broke up laughing at the apparent field of view spec. You've got to hand it to Vixen, the same company that brought you a 1.6mm focal length eyepiece (2187x in the 25") now brings you a 100mm.

Kent


Re: A new Vixen eyepeice

Jeffrey Thornton
 

I think I will stick with the telrad....lol


Re: A new Vixen eyepeice

Ian Stewart
 

20mm would be wasted on my poor old eyes - 6mm if I'm lucky and haven't had a scotch.

On 3/1/2021 11:36 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Vixen Optics has a new eyepiece; a 100mm focal length. Wow, no kidding! That would be 35x in my 25" f/5, or 12x in my Orion 10" f/4., both yielding a 20mm exit pupil. Anyone out there have pupils that open to 20mm? Let me know if so. 
Check it out on the B& H Photo site, 79 bucks shipped.. I broke up laughing at the apparent field of view spec. You've got to hand it to Vixen, the same company that brought you a 1.6mm focal length eyepiece (2187x in the 25") now brings you a 100mm.

Kent

361 - 380 of 52872