Date   

Webinar (Web Seminar) on Light Pollution

George Reynolds
 

All are invited to join the Night Sky Network Webinar (Web Seminar) on Light Pollution on January 28 at 9:00 PM Eastern time to hear Kelley Beatty discuss the impact of light pollution on society, and our ability to view the night sky.

The event will also be streaming live on YouTube, but please note that questions asked over the NSN-members-only Zoom Q&A will be prioritized.
Linkhttps://youtu.be/_udmZngg9hg

The recording will be uploaded both to the webinar's resource page and to the NSN YouTube page for folks that are unable to attend this evening's session. 

About Kelly Beatty

Kelly Beatty has been explaining the science and wonder of astronomy to the public since 1974. An award-winning writer and communicator, he specializes in planetary science and space exploration as Senior Editor for Sky & Telescope magazine. Beatty enjoys sharing his passion for astronomy with a wide spectrum of audiences, from children to professional astronomers, and you'll occasionally hear his interviews and guest commentaries on National Public Radio and The Weather Channel. He served for a decade on the Board of Directors for the International Dark-Sky Association and is an officer for IDA's Massachusetts Chapter.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Celestron,Borg,Losmandy outfit for sale

joseph_piotrowski <joepiotrowski@cox.net>
 

This is a full oufit and if you respond I will give details of the entire outfit. Total retail cost was $11,707.00 and I am selling for 50%($6000). Would prefer local pick up.Main items:These are 50% prices.
1.Celestron 9.25" SCT Starbright plus many extras 1183.00
2.Televue 6mm Radian,17mm Nagler,27mm Panoptic 472.00
3.Losmandy GM-8 plus dewbuster etc 1981.00
4.Mallincam Skyraider 2.3 Plus and adapters 539.00
5.Borg 76ED refractor and adaptors(many) 1310.00
each group above inncludes pelican case(except eyepieces)
Have Excell file I can send with all items.


USNO Data Services STILL offline

George Reynolds
 

I get and download my annual sunrise/sunset, moonrise/moonset, and twilight times calendars from the U. S. Naval Observatory's  Data Services division of the Astronomical Applications Department, but they have been OFFLINE since October 2019!  They said their "modernization" would take until 30 April 2020.  Then later, they said it would be up in Fall 2020.  NOW they say they MAY be back by Spring, 2021!  Here is their notice:

This US Naval Observatory Website is undergoing modernization and will be offline starting Thursday, 24 October 2019.   The expected completion of work and return of service is estimated to be spring, 2021, subject to change due to potential impacts of COVID-19.  Please visit usno.navy.mil and submit a Requirements Form to the USNO PAO if the information you are seeking is not accessible via another means.

Fortunately, the Sun's rise and set times do not differ more than a minute or two from one year to the next, so I can use the 2020 calendars in 2021.  The same goes for the timing of civil twilight, nautical twilight, and astronomical twilight; however, the Moon's rise and set times are totally different from year to year, so I need to get that data another way.  Fortunately, there are other sources, but the easiest one was to go to the USNO site.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

jimcoble2000
 

this Jim                (   .  )

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:56:05 PM EST, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


What does it look like? 😎


On Jan 23, 2021 at 12:10, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Ted, I was  looking through my logs. I thought last night was the first time I've seen The Pup from Virginia Beach location but apparently I also saw it on a night of excellent seeing with the 25" January 30, 2002 using a 10.5mm Gailand Orthoscopic eyepiece. The Gailand is one of the finest eyepieces ever made, unfortunately long discontinued. I have yet to see it in my 100/800 TMB refractor. Everyone get out you telescopes and give it a try. Hey, what could be easier to find in the night sky than Sirius?


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Ian Stewart
 

Well I took the challenge last night with my 5 inch. Sirius looked like the backdrop to the Fireworks Symphony ( this after a couple hours of cooling). Seeing was horrible. That said the terminator was in a perfect spot to bring out some great detail in Sinus Iridium on the moon. That whole area around the northwest corner was well lit ... Cheers Ian


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Jim Tallman
 

What does it look like? 😎


On Jan 23, 2021 at 12:10, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Ted, I was  looking through my logs. I thought last night was the first time I've seen The Pup from Virginia Beach location but apparently I also saw it on a night of excellent seeing with the 25" January 30, 2002 using a 10.5mm Gailand Orthoscopic eyepiece. The Gailand is one of the finest eyepieces ever made, unfortunately long discontinued. I have yet to see it in my 100/800 TMB refractor. Everyone get out you telescopes and give it a try. Hey, what could be easier to find in the night sky than Sirius?


Fun objects viewed Friday night

Kent Blackwell
 

Besides splitting Sirius it was a pretty good night, considering a very bright moon in light polluted skies. Most interesting was the planetary nebula ARO 220, better known as Abell 12. It’s a large round nebula nearly involved with the bright 4th magnitude star Mu Orionis. My first sighting of it dates back to 2001. Ted, remember looking at it in 2005? I remember showing it to CJ one night. It’s a fun object. 

We didn’t see a lot of objects last night but what we saw were all beautiful.

List: 21/01:22 VB 25”

 

NGC 2372

(Planetary Nebula in Gemini)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 7:32:44 PM

Comment: Quite faint tonight with no filter with a 70% full moon. The UHC filter helped considerably. 

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 6

Transparency: 6

 

Trapezium - Theta1 Ori

(Variable Double Star in Orion)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 7:45:15 PM

Comment: All six stars easily visible. Excellent seeing tonight 

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

NGC 1535

(Planetary Nebula in Eridanus)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 7:55:46 PM

Comment: Lots of details with the 5mm Pentax at 700x.

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

TYC 1332-1045-1

(Star in Gemini)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 8:05:39 PM

Comment: Deep red 9th magnitude carbon star near the PNe J 900

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

Jonckheere 900

(Planetary Nebula in Gemini)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 8:08:37 PM

Comment: Fairly small and quite bright even without a filter. Responds very well to the Orion UltraBlock filter 

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

Minkowski 1-7

(Planetary Nebula in Gemini)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 8:14:52 PM

Comment: Fairly bright PNe just above a bright star. Blinks beautifully with the Orion UltraBlock filter 

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

ARO 220

(Planetary Nebula in Orion)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 8:35:43 PM

Comment: AKA, Abell 12

Fairly large PNe that is so interesting because it's nearly attached to the bright star. Not all that challenging with the Orion UltraBlock filter. This is my 10th time seeing Abell 12, but the first from light polluted Virginia Beach.

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

Hind's Crimson Star - R Lep

(Variable Star in Lepus)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 9:06:39 PM

Comment: One of the best carbon stars in the sky 

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

NGC 2362

(Open Cluster in Canis Major)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 9:08:53 PM

Comment: One of my favorite open clusters, especially with bright Tau Canis Majoris. Stars fill the field of view. Tau is considered to be a massive star 500,000 times more luminous than our sun!

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 

Sirius - Alpha CMa

(Double Star in Canis Major)

Observed: Jan 22, 2021 at 9:22:02 PM

Comment: !!Wow, Mark Ost was the first to see Sirius B, and without resorting to an occulting eyepiece. I have only seen "The Pup" several times in my life. Tonight it was about 10 arc seconds separation but Sirius is 10,000 times brighter so truly a challenging double star.

Location: Va VA Beach 61% % SQM-L 16.3 46° H671

Equipment: 25" F/5, 16mm Nagler

Seeing: 8

Transparency: 9

 


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Kent Blackwell
 

Ted, I was  looking through my logs. I thought last night was the first time I've seen The Pup from Virginia Beach location but apparently I also saw it on a night of excellent seeing with the 25" January 30, 2002 using a 10.5mm Gailand Orthoscopic eyepiece. The Gailand is one of the finest eyepieces ever made, unfortunately long discontinued. I have yet to see it in my 100/800 TMB refractor. Everyone get out you telescopes and give it a try. Hey, what could be easier to find in the night sky than Sirius?


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

jimcoble2000
 

Thank you Ian. You know I don't think there is much skill involved with doing this outside of persistence. It is mostly a matter of luck and the universe deciding to let you in during that hour. Most of the time the door is locked and nothing you can do will get you in. That was also the first time I have seen it without an occulting disc. That was most surprising.

We have done two very difficult doubles this year. Porrima was the other star that you can only do when the pair are the furthest apart. Both have 100:1 failure to success ratio

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:48:01 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Jerry Lodriguss has a great image of Sirius and the pup on his website ... Cheers Ian

Sirius and Pup

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Ted Forte
 

Mark wrote (re: viewing Sirius) “I am not sure an amateur refractor can do it … ”

 

I’m surprised by your saying that Mark. In my experience, a refractor and twilight is the ticket!  I’ve had three successful observations of Sirius (maybe four).

 

March 31, 2000 at NWRP (in twilight) Bob Stewart and I viewed the Pup in his 4-inch refractor.

 

March 6, 2010 at Ost Observatory, we saw it in your refractor, Mark.

 

March 26,  2015 at Patterson Observatory (in twilight) I saw it with Rick Burke’s 4-inch refractor.

 

I’ve tried it twice with the 30 and failed.

 

There was one more time, at a gathering at Kent’s trailer in Coinjock circa 2000 or so.  I don’t have any notes but I remember it being a thing.

 

Ted

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 6:39 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

 

It was quite remarkable. The conditions were perfect. That is only the second time in 30 some years I have seen it. It all came together. I am not sure an amateur refractor can do it due to the nature of the diffraction pattern inherent in refractors. Maybe it can though. It would be interesting to see if anyone else has done it that way. The spider diffraction was in a perfect position to view and locate the secondary.  

 

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:33:07 AM EST, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:

 

 

Good job!!

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:

Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Ian Stewart
 

Jerry Lodriguss has a great image of Sirius and the pup on his website ... Cheers Ian

Sirius and Pup

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


I was reading an article that had nothing to do with astronomy but the statement is so true

jimcoble2000
 

Yes, I know: “You see, but you do not observe.”We balance probabilities and choose the most likely. It is the scientific use of the imagination”. You can add up all his aphorisms and still come no closer to the inner workings of his mind, his imagination.

About Sherlock Holmes


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

jimcoble2000
 

It was quite remarkable. The conditions were perfect. That is only the second time in 30 some years I have seen it. It all came together. I am not sure an amateur refractor can do it due to the nature of the diffraction pattern inherent in refractors. Maybe it can though. It would be interesting to see if anyone else has done it that way. The spider diffraction was in a perfect position to view and locate the secondary.  

On Saturday, January 23, 2021, 8:33:07 AM EST, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:


Good job!!

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Re: Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Ian Stewart
 

Good job!!

On 1/23/2021 8:18 AM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Viewing Sirius on a cold winter night

Kent Blackwell
 

Mark O and I split the brilliant star Sirius last night with the 25" from my backyard observatory in Virginia Beach. I've only split it a few times in my 50 years of stargazing. The current separation is 10 arc-seconds. So, what's the big deal, that's not all that close. The problem is Sirius is 10,000 times brighter than Sirius B, often called The Pup.


Re: Need info on three past BBAA meetings

Shawn Loescher
 

All of the video from the meetings that Jeff posted are still available online. I took a quick look at them to refresh my memory.

August - After the normal club business you showed a video titled Cosmic Collisions narrated by Robert Redford.
Access Passcode: *XB4W6fb

September - Tom Field gave a presentation on spectroscopy
Access Passcode: *XB4W6fb
Meeting Recording: https://vccs.zoom.us/rec/play/LL1DvDXJJkd9sIBhGCFgcVDzPGem09TrWgR_-_p96uc8j0rCT0bdveePd0ANZmYpwx1CQtKcVw3d4ipp.tF7GrTpnkNgSAvqJ?continueMode=true&_x_zm_rtaid=7KCvWuKRRI6GYxGAsRT4sg.1611328397576.f3710ec67ff2cb0856cfc50f5f1c8d4f&_x_zm_rhtaid=640


November - Elections took most of the meeting time. Also club member Scott Mecca was put in charge of seeing if its feasible for the club to find a location for an observatory.
Access Passcode: BBAA11-5
Meeting Recording: https://vccs.zoom.us/rec/play/L6d5Z4jTJ0vgspUek6fPRBr8yom9PwfXU6uEPg_LhkdGIyOnKI4qV8ko1YWryMF0C2U2bOlsPgBRroem._GN3snzqd-fHVRug?continueMode=true&_x_zm_rtaid=7KCvWuKRRI6GYxGAsRT4sg.1611328397576.f3710ec67ff2cb0856cfc50f5f1c8d4f&_x_zm_rhtaid=640


Need info on three past BBAA meetings

George Reynolds
 

Does anyone remember what was covered in the August, September, and November BBAA meetings?  They are still open in the Night Sky Network, and need to have an event report made.  There were no meeting minutes posted to the BBAA website in 7 out of the 12 months of 2020, so I could not go to the minutes.  Also, we did not have a newsletter all year, so I could not go to the Newsletter for information.

There have been no postings of the newsletter at all in 2020 (in fact, 2020 is not even listed), and the Web site still says that Kayla Robinson is the club secretary.  If I had known no one was taking minutes during the whole year, I would have taken notes and submitted them for minutes.  I thought we were recording the meetings so minutes could be made.  If so, they are not posted on the BBAA website.  Some areas of the website are out of date.

Can anyone help?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: Star Parties and Informational Seminars

Shawn Loescher
 

More information about the Winter Star Party in Florida.

"Hello, attached is a link to a promo video on YouTube for the 2021 Winter Star Party Virtual Edition. We invite your club member to be part of this free online event. The video includes instructions on how to register for the door prizes as well as tune-in information for the star party. If you agve any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Keep looking up. Thank you.
 
 
Sergio Figuera"


Re: Sh2 261 Lower's Nebula

Ian Stewart
 

Added the color data that i got last night to the previous Ha image ... Cheers Ian
Lower's Nebula HaRGB


Re: Sh2 261 Lower's Nebula

RapidEye
 

Gotcha - thanks.

On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 2:54 PM Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:

Hey Jim, Jellyfish is SH2 248 or IC443 but they do look a lot alike. Here's one of the Jellyfish I took last year ... Cheers Ian

Jellyfish Nebula

On 1/19/2021 12:55 PM, RapidEye wrote:
Is that also called the Jellyfish?
Looks nice in any case


On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 12:31 PM Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:
Managed some time on Lower's nebula last night. This is the Ha data. I'll try for color tonight if the weather holds ... Cheers Ian
Lower's Nebula

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