Date   

Re: "Astronomy" Mag. gives George Reynolds a shout out.

preciousmyprecious
 

George is of National Prominence now. Well done!

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Wednesday, November 18, 2020, 06:08:19 PM EST, bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:


"Astronomy" Mag. Dec. 2020, pg. 58.  Glenn Chaple article on "Astronomy Guides; Readers Picks" gave George Reynolds of Back Bay Amateur Astronomers a plug for recommending "Turn Left at Orion" by Guy Consolmagno.

George Reynolds and BBAA get recognized for all their hard work!

Bob


"Astronomy" Mag. gives George Reynolds a shout out.

bob414
 

"Astronomy" Mag. Dec. 2020, pg. 58.  Glenn Chaple article on "Astronomy Guides; Readers Picks" gave George Reynolds of Back Bay Amateur Astronomers a plug for recommending "Turn Left at Orion" by Guy Consolmagno.

George Reynolds and BBAA get recognized for all their hard work!

Bob


Re: A retraction and addendum to Coinjock observing.

Ted Forte
 

My first view of the “bubble” in NGC 7635 was probably just feet away from where you were viewing it.  October 7, 1999 through Kent’s 25 at Coinjock.  I’ve logged successful sightings of the bubble four times – twice in Kent’s 25 and twice in my 30.  I have several observations of NGC 7635 with the 18-inch that does not show this spherical orb to best advantage , instead, just the comma shaped glow of the bright nebula extending from the star you mention, and I’ve not seen it in anything smaller.

 

I have often noted it as looking like a reflection nebula, illuminated by the sta,r but the nebula does respond well to narrowband filters and must have a strong emission component.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2020 9:12 AM
To: BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>; VPAS <vpas@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] A retraction and addendum to Coinjock observing.

 

Upon further research and examination I think I need to clarify statement about observing the bubble nebula the other night. Kent and I did indeed see a small part of it but I was fooled into the classic mistake of thinking NGC 7635 was the bubble nebula, as is often listed. This listing is not entirely accurate it seems. The bubble does lie in the NGC nebula but is only a tiny part of it and much more difficult to see. There is a lot going on up there in that small part of the sky. Pictures don't help much either as they do not represent what you see at the telescope. After looking for a bit I thought the nebula extended to a 7th magnitude star across from M-52. Which it does. The bubble is a very dim tiny feature under this star. We did see where it was and perhaps only a small part but did not correctly isolate the bubble as a distinct object. I don't think this can be done with a small scope. you might see a little of the bubble itself but only a little. It does deserve it's reputation as a difficult object  perhaps suitable for only large telescopes. I am happy for what little we did see but needed to clarify my previous statement based on incomplete information. Mea Culpa.


A retraction and addendum to Coinjock observing.

jimcoble2000
 

Upon further research and examination I think I need to clarify statement about observing the bubble nebula the other night. Kent and I did indeed see a small part of it but I was fooled into the classic mistake of thinking NGC 7635 was the bubble nebula, as is often listed. This listing is not entirely accurate it seems. The bubble does lie in the NGC nebula but is only a tiny part of it and much more difficult to see. There is a lot going on up there in that small part of the sky. Pictures don't help much either as they do not represent what you see at the telescope. After looking for a bit I thought the nebula extended to a 7th magnitude star across from M-52. Which it does. The bubble is a very dim tiny feature under this star. We did see where it was and perhaps only a small part but did not correctly isolate the bubble as a distinct object. I don't think this can be done with a small scope. you might see a little of the bubble itself but only a little. It does deserve it's reputation as a difficult object  perhaps suitable for only large telescopes. I am happy for what little we did see but needed to clarify my previous statement based on incomplete information. Mea Culpa.


Leonid Meteor Shower

George Reynolds
 

Is anyone planning on going to Coprnland tonight to try to see the Leonid Meteor Shower?

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: NGC1333 From Last Night

jimcoble2000
 

I was looking at VDB 1 last night. Quite similar. You sure could see the Merope nebula last night around the Pleiades . The high contrast of the flourite glass Genesis makes that scope good for this type of thing. It was a nice night last night.

On Tuesday, November 17, 2020, 9:33:58 AM EST, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


A crisp clear cool night last night. Guiding/seeing was a little funky but I did some time on NGC1333 a wonderful little reflection nebula in Perseus.
Cheers
Ian
NGC1333


Re: [VPAS] [BackBayAstro] Return to Coinjock

jimcoble2000
 

The place is closing in a couple of weeks. There would be some draw backs for a speculative future ECSP even if KOA would go along with it (not guaranteed at all) and if Kent wanted to even do it, especially as there are much higher costs and other structural problems. I got out there last night as the one more shot this year. Much easier to do it individually at the end of the season. Next year maybe a vaccine will bring us back to normal. I don't know. This year is over. It was just nice to one more time stand in the field.

On Tuesday, November 17, 2020, 2:55:27 PM EST, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:


I am thinking out loud that perhaps we could organize a return to Coinjock impromptu stargazing session this Fall/Winter?
On November 17, 2020 1:51 PM Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Great write-up Mark. Unfortunately we all knew of few of those ghosts out there. I miss them. I also miss ECSP. Maybe someday.

Cheers

Ian


On 11/17/2020 10:53 AM, Mark Ost wrote:
I am surprised Kent has not files a report from last night's observing and old folks week. I had booked a night down in Coinjock at the KOA. Monday looked a sure bet for weather and I figured that no one would be camping on Monday with a 40 degree night.

I arrived early at the site in order to seize a camping spot where I used to set up in the Cedars. I thought I should hedge my bets and prevent anyone from starting a fire where it would spoil the view. I need not have worried. No one came at all as I had predicted. I knew Kent and Bob might join me down there in the evening. I spent a quiet day reading in 60 degree weather undisturbed. The cedars are as they were before. The rest of the campground has been remarkably changed but as Kent said the outside lighting has been modified for a more night friendly illumination. More on that later.

I was quite happy to be back but with the coming of the long shadows at 5 in the afternoon I think I understand what the Native Americans say about the landscape being haunted by ghosts of their ancestors. As you remember that was the time most people started filing into the cedars back in the old days but it was only me left standing where so many once were; now only ghosts. It had not occurred to me to feel this way, unbidden, until the sun started to set but I swear it was distinctly strange to be there alone as none of you all were there anymore.

Yes there are ghosts and they do inhabit the land. You just have to be there at the right time and listen. Fortunately Kent and Bob pulled up just as too many memories were coming up.

We set up my 4 inch and Kent broke out his 25. Kent had informed me he though it was darker than before since the new lighting had been installed. Also there is less traffic due to the different population at the camp ground, most of whom had gone for the season. Kent was right. I think it is much darker now.

I believe Kent is late in his narrative due to all the stars looking like planetaries in somewhat poor seeing. He has a zillion sightings to report. Here my four inch had the advantage. Seeing did not really affect me as much using small aperture. The difference between the 3 and 25 seeing wise was remarkable. It was a huge pleasure to observe again under dark skies. You never really know what your scope can do until you get in the right place. I was able to see most galaxies Kent was chasing if not define them quite as much. In 10 transparency there were an infinite supply of galaxies and nebula to be see even in a 4 inch. And even one new comet.

I will let Kent provide a more comprehensive list of objects but the highlights for me were the bubble nebula, a combination of open cluster and nebula called the "spider and the fly" in Auriga, NGC 235 way down south in both the 4 and the 25 almost through the trees. I had never spent much time on the bubble for some reason but last night it was easy the Televue with a Baader UHC. Just an amazing delicate object. You first see the bright clutch of stars but then the bubble come clear with a bit of patience, a transparent soap bubble in the sky. Many galaxies were seen, too many to mention without getting boring.

And oh yes, that comet Atlas in Orion. There had been some discussion as the magnitude of it. Kent and I agreed it was 9th magnitude and a fine telescopic comet. It is a wide fan shape with a fainter tail that does extend a bit of distance from the head. Last night it was close on to a 7th magnitude star and at low power merged into the star. It does respond to a comet filter which helps show the wide fan of a tail. Easily seen in the 4 and 25. Kent and Bob left around 1030 and I stayed the night. I quit around midnight exhausted. The milky ways just blazed overhead. It was worth the 50$ a night for camping in that sky. The final parting shot was at midnight a dinosaur killing meteor just blazed east to west under Orion. It lit up the campground. I have never seen such a wide wide path. It looked like smoke was rolling off it. It lasted forever in a huge wide green streak. That was the largest one I have ever seen.

Left the haunted ground at 730 this morning to go back to VB.

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers  http://www.backbayastro.org/

Member - Sangre Stargazers  http://sangrestargazers.skymtn.com/>

Rott'n Paws Observatory <http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm>

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512 <http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm>

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range <http://www.ncrr.net/>


Re: Return to Coinjock

Ian Stewart
 

Well, maybe in the spring - $50 would be worth it to see you guys ... Cheers Ian

On 11/17/2020 3:33 PM, Kent Blackwell wrote:
KOA OBX closes November 30 for the season. The fee is another issue, $50 per night in advance with no refunds. 


Re: Return to Coinjock

Kent Blackwell
 

KOA OBX closes November 30 for the season. The fee is another issue, $50 per night in advance with no refunds. 


Re: Return to Coinjock

Ian Stewart
 

I'm in ... Ian

On 11/17/2020 2:55 PM, charles jagow wrote:
I am thinking out loud that perhaps we could organize a return to Coinjock impromptu stargazing session this Fall/Winter?
On November 17, 2020 1:51 PM Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Great write-up Mark. Unfortunately we all knew of few of those ghosts out there. I miss them. I also miss ECSP. Maybe someday.

Cheers

Ian


On 11/17/2020 10:53 AM, Mark Ost wrote:
I am surprised Kent has not files a report from last night's observing and old folks week. I had booked a night down in Coinjock at the KOA. Monday looked a sure bet for weather and I figured that no one would be camping on Monday with a 40 degree night.

I arrived early at the site in order to seize a camping spot where I used to set up in the Cedars. I thought I should hedge my bets and prevent anyone from starting a fire where it would spoil the view. I need not have worried. No one came at all as I had predicted. I knew Kent and Bob might join me down there in the evening. I spent a quiet day reading in 60 degree weather undisturbed. The cedars are as they were before. The rest of the campground has been remarkably changed but as Kent said the outside lighting has been modified for a more night friendly illumination. More on that later.

I was quite happy to be back but with the coming of the long shadows at 5 in the afternoon I think I understand what the Native Americans say about the landscape being haunted by ghosts of their ancestors. As you remember that was the time most people started filing into the cedars back in the old days but it was only me left standing where so many once were; now only ghosts. It had not occurred to me to feel this way, unbidden, until the sun started to set but I swear it was distinctly strange to be there alone as none of you all were there anymore.

Yes there are ghosts and they do inhabit the land. You just have to be there at the right time and listen. Fortunately Kent and Bob pulled up just as too many memories were coming up.

We set up my 4 inch and Kent broke out his 25. Kent had informed me he though it was darker than before since the new lighting had been installed. Also there is less traffic due to the different population at the camp ground, most of whom had gone for the season. Kent was right. I think it is much darker now.

I believe Kent is late in his narrative due to all the stars looking like planetaries in somewhat poor seeing. He has a zillion sightings to report. Here my four inch had the advantage. Seeing did not really affect me as much using small aperture. The difference between the 3 and 25 seeing wise was remarkable. It was a huge pleasure to observe again under dark skies. You never really know what your scope can do until you get in the right place. I was able to see most galaxies Kent was chasing if not define them quite as much. In 10 transparency there were an infinite supply of galaxies and nebula to be see even in a 4 inch. And even one new comet.

I will let Kent provide a more comprehensive list of objects but the highlights for me were the bubble nebula, a combination of open cluster and nebula called the "spider and the fly" in Auriga, NGC 235 way down south in both the 4 and the 25 almost through the trees. I had never spent much time on the bubble for some reason but last night it was easy the Televue with a Baader UHC. Just an amazing delicate object. You first see the bright clutch of stars but then the bubble come clear with a bit of patience, a transparent soap bubble in the sky. Many galaxies were seen, too many to mention without getting boring.

And oh yes, that comet Atlas in Orion. There had been some discussion as the magnitude of it. Kent and I agreed it was 9th magnitude and a fine telescopic comet. It is a wide fan shape with a fainter tail that does extend a bit of distance from the head. Last night it was close on to a 7th magnitude star and at low power merged into the star. It does respond to a comet filter which helps show the wide fan of a tail. Easily seen in the 4 and 25. Kent and Bob left around 1030 and I stayed the night. I quit around midnight exhausted. The milky ways just blazed overhead. It was worth the 50$ a night for camping in that sky. The final parting shot was at midnight a dinosaur killing meteor just blazed east to west under Orion. It lit up the campground. I have never seen such a wide wide path. It looked like smoke was rolling off it. It lasted forever in a huge wide green streak. That was the largest one I have ever seen.

Left the haunted ground at 730 this morning to go back to VB.

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers  http://www.backbayastro.org/

Member - Sangre Stargazers  http://sangrestargazers.skymtn.com/>

Rott'n Paws Observatory <http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm>

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512 <http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm>

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range <http://www.ncrr.net/>


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Return to Coinjock

charles jagow
 

I am thinking out loud that perhaps we could organize a return to Coinjock impromptu stargazing session this Fall/Winter?
On November 17, 2020 1:51 PM Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Great write-up Mark. Unfortunately we all knew of few of those ghosts out there. I miss them. I also miss ECSP. Maybe someday.

Cheers

Ian


On 11/17/2020 10:53 AM, Mark Ost wrote:
I am surprised Kent has not files a report from last night's observing and old folks week. I had booked a night down in Coinjock at the KOA. Monday looked a sure bet for weather and I figured that no one would be camping on Monday with a 40 degree night.

I arrived early at the site in order to seize a camping spot where I used to set up in the Cedars. I thought I should hedge my bets and prevent anyone from starting a fire where it would spoil the view. I need not have worried. No one came at all as I had predicted. I knew Kent and Bob might join me down there in the evening. I spent a quiet day reading in 60 degree weather undisturbed. The cedars are as they were before. The rest of the campground has been remarkably changed but as Kent said the outside lighting has been modified for a more night friendly illumination. More on that later.

I was quite happy to be back but with the coming of the long shadows at 5 in the afternoon I think I understand what the Native Americans say about the landscape being haunted by ghosts of their ancestors. As you remember that was the time most people started filing into the cedars back in the old days but it was only me left standing where so many once were; now only ghosts. It had not occurred to me to feel this way, unbidden, until the sun started to set but I swear it was distinctly strange to be there alone as none of you all were there anymore.

Yes there are ghosts and they do inhabit the land. You just have to be there at the right time and listen. Fortunately Kent and Bob pulled up just as too many memories were coming up.

We set up my 4 inch and Kent broke out his 25. Kent had informed me he though it was darker than before since the new lighting had been installed. Also there is less traffic due to the different population at the camp ground, most of whom had gone for the season. Kent was right. I think it is much darker now.

I believe Kent is late in his narrative due to all the stars looking like planetaries in somewhat poor seeing. He has a zillion sightings to report. Here my four inch had the advantage. Seeing did not really affect me as much using small aperture. The difference between the 3 and 25 seeing wise was remarkable. It was a huge pleasure to observe again under dark skies. You never really know what your scope can do until you get in the right place. I was able to see most galaxies Kent was chasing if not define them quite as much. In 10 transparency there were an infinite supply of galaxies and nebula to be see even in a 4 inch. And even one new comet.

I will let Kent provide a more comprehensive list of objects but the highlights for me were the bubble nebula, a combination of open cluster and nebula called the "spider and the fly" in Auriga, NGC 235 way down south in both the 4 and the 25 almost through the trees. I had never spent much time on the bubble for some reason but last night it was easy the Televue with a Baader UHC. Just an amazing delicate object. You first see the bright clutch of stars but then the bubble come clear with a bit of patience, a transparent soap bubble in the sky. Many galaxies were seen, too many to mention without getting boring.

And oh yes, that comet Atlas in Orion. There had been some discussion as the magnitude of it. Kent and I agreed it was 9th magnitude and a fine telescopic comet. It is a wide fan shape with a fainter tail that does extend a bit of distance from the head. Last night it was close on to a 7th magnitude star and at low power merged into the star. It does respond to a comet filter which helps show the wide fan of a tail. Easily seen in the 4 and 25. Kent and Bob left around 1030 and I stayed the night. I quit around midnight exhausted. The milky ways just blazed overhead. It was worth the 50$ a night for camping in that sky. The final parting shot was at midnight a dinosaur killing meteor just blazed east to west under Orion. It lit up the campground. I have never seen such a wide wide path. It looked like smoke was rolling off it. It lasted forever in a huge wide green streak. That was the largest one I have ever seen.

Left the haunted ground at 730 this morning to go back to VB.

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers  http://www.backbayastro.org/

Member - Sangre Stargazers  http://sangrestargazers.skymtn.com/>

Rott'n Paws Observatory <http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm>

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512 <http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm>

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range <http://www.ncrr.net/>


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Return to Coinjock

Ian Stewart
 

Great write-up Mark. Unfortunately we all knew of few of those ghosts out there. I miss them. I also miss ECSP. Maybe someday.

Cheers

Ian


On 11/17/2020 10:53 AM, Mark Ost wrote:
I am surprised Kent has not files a report from last night's observing and old folks week. I had booked a night down in Coinjock at the KOA. Monday looked a sure bet for weather and I figured that no one would be camping on Monday with a 40 degree night.

I arrived early at the site in order to seize a camping spot where I used to set up in the Cedars. I thought I should hedge my bets and prevent anyone from starting a fire where it would spoil the view. I need not have worried. No one came at all as I had predicted. I knew Kent and Bob might join me down there in the evening. I spent a quiet day reading in 60 degree weather undisturbed. The cedars are as they were before. The rest of the campground has been remarkably changed but as Kent said the outside lighting has been modified for a more night friendly illumination. More on that later.

I was quite happy to be back but with the coming of the long shadows at 5 in the afternoon I think I understand what the Native Americans say about the landscape being haunted by ghosts of their ancestors. As you remember that was the time most people started filing into the cedars back in the old days but it was only me left standing where so many once were; now only ghosts. It had not occurred to me to feel this way, unbidden, until the sun started to set but I swear it was distinctly strange to be there alone as none of you all were there anymore.

Yes there are ghosts and they do inhabit the land. You just have to be there at the right time and listen. Fortunately Kent and Bob pulled up just as too many memories were coming up.

We set up my 4 inch and Kent broke out his 25. Kent had informed me he though it was darker than before since the new lighting had been installed. Also there is less traffic due to the different population at the camp ground, most of whom had gone for the season. Kent was right. I think it is much darker now.

I believe Kent is late in his narrative due to all the stars looking like planetaries in somewhat poor seeing. He has a zillion sightings to report. Here my four inch had the advantage. Seeing did not really affect me as much using small aperture. The difference between the 3 and 25 seeing wise was remarkable. It was a huge pleasure to observe again under dark skies. You never really know what your scope can do until you get in the right place. I was able to see most galaxies Kent was chasing if not define them quite as much. In 10 transparency there were an infinite supply of galaxies and nebula to be see even in a 4 inch. And even one new comet.

I will let Kent provide a more comprehensive list of objects but the highlights for me were the bubble nebula, a combination of open cluster and nebula called the "spider and the fly" in Auriga, NGC 235 way down south in both the 4 and the 25 almost through the trees. I had never spent much time on the bubble for some reason but last night it was easy the Televue with a Baader UHC. Just an amazing delicate object. You first see the bright clutch of stars but then the bubble come clear with a bit of patience, a transparent soap bubble in the sky. Many galaxies were seen, too many to mention without getting boring.

And oh yes, that comet Atlas in Orion. There had been some discussion as the magnitude of it. Kent and I agreed it was 9th magnitude and a fine telescopic comet. It is a wide fan shape with a fainter tail that does extend a bit of distance from the head. Last night it was close on to a 7th magnitude star and at low power merged into the star. It does respond to a comet filter which helps show the wide fan of a tail. Easily seen in the 4 and 25. Kent and Bob left around 1030 and I stayed the night. I quit around midnight exhausted. The milky ways just blazed overhead. It was worth the 50$ a night for camping in that sky. The final parting shot was at midnight a dinosaur killing meteor just blazed east to west under Orion. It lit up the campground. I have never seen such a wide wide path. It looked like smoke was rolling off it. It lasted forever in a huge wide green streak. That was the largest one I have ever seen.

Left the haunted ground at 730 this morning to go back to VB.


Sorry about some of the typos. I am barely conscious after a late night

jimcoble2000
 

You can fill in the gaps


Return to Coinjock

jimcoble2000
 

I am surprised Kent has not files a report from last night's observing and old folks week. I had booked a night down in Coinjock at the KOA. Monday looked a sure bet for weather and I figured that no one would be camping on Monday with a 40 degree night.

I arrived early at the site in order to seize a camping spot where I used to set up in the Cedars. I thought I should hedge my bets and prevent anyone from starting a fire where it would spoil the view. I need not have worried. No one came at all as I had predicted. I knew Kent and Bob might join me down there in the evening. I spent a quiet day reading in 60 degree weather undisturbed. The cedars are as they were before. The rest of the campground has been remarkably changed but as Kent said the outside lighting has been modified for a more night friendly illumination. More on that later.

I was quite happy to be back but with the coming of the long shadows at 5 in the afternoon I think I understand what the Native Americans say about the landscape being haunted by ghosts of their ancestors. As you remember that was the time most people started filing into the cedars back in the old days but it was only me left standing where so many once were; now only ghosts. It had not occurred to me to feel this way, unbidden, until the sun started to set but I swear it was distinctly strange to be there alone as none of you all were there anymore.

Yes there are ghosts and they do inhabit the land. You just have to be there at the right time and listen. Fortunately Kent and Bob pulled up just as too many memories were coming up.

We set up my 4 inch and Kent broke out his 25. Kent had informed me he though it was darker than before since the new lighting had been installed. Also there is less traffic due to the different population at the camp ground, most of whom had gone for the season. Kent was right. I think it is much darker now.

I believe Kent is late in his narrative due to all the stars looking like planetaries in somewhat poor seeing. He has a zillion sightings to report. Here my four inch had the advantage. Seeing did not really affect me as much using small aperture. The difference between the 3 and 25 seeing wise was remarkable. It was a huge pleasure to observe again under dark skies. You never really know what your scope can do until you get in the right place. I was able to see most galaxies Kent was chasing if not define them quite as much. In 10 transparency there were an infinite supply of galaxies and nebula to be see even in a 4 inch. And even one new comet.

I will let Kent provide a more comprehensive list of objects but the highlights for me were the bubble nebula, a combination of open cluster and nebula called the "spider and the fly" in Auriga, NGC 235 way down south in both the 4 and the 25 almost through the trees. I had never spent much time on the bubble for some reason but last night it was easy the Televue with a Baader UHC. Just an amazing delicate object. You first see the bright clutch of stars but then the bubble come clear with a bit of patience, a transparent soap bubble in the sky. Many galaxies were seen, too many to mention without getting boring.

And oh yes, that comet Atlas in Orion. There had been some discussion as the magnitude of it. Kent and I agreed it was 9th magnitude and a fine telescopic comet. It is a wide fan shape with a fainter tail that does extend a bit of distance from the head. Last night it was close on to a 7th magnitude star and at low power merged into the star. It does respond to a comet filter which helps show the wide fan of a tail. Easily seen in the 4 and 25. Kent and Bob left around 1030 and I stayed the night. I quit around midnight exhausted. The milky ways just blazed overhead. It was worth the 50$ a night for camping in that sky. The final parting shot was at midnight a dinosaur killing meteor just blazed east to west under Orion. It lit up the campground. I have never seen such a wide wide path. It looked like smoke was rolling off it. It lasted forever in a huge wide green streak. That was the largest one I have ever seen.

Left the haunted ground at 730 this morning to go back to VB.


Re: NGC1333 From Last Night

Roy Diffrient
 

Pretty cute, Ian – love that “reflection blue“.  

I went out around midnight - 1 am last night looking for Leonids.  Didn’t see any – no meteor storm this year I guess.  But the stars were bright and extremely twinkly here.  Not great seeing I’m sure.

Roy


On Nov 17, 2020, at 9:33 AM, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:

A crisp clear cool night last night. Guiding/seeing was a little funky but I did some time on NGC1333 a wonderful little reflection nebula in Perseus.
Cheers
Ian
NGC1333


NGC1333 From Last Night

Ian Stewart
 

A crisp clear cool night last night. Guiding/seeing was a little funky but I did some time on NGC1333 a wonderful little reflection nebula in Perseus.
Cheers
Ian
NGC1333


FW: [VPAS] SpaceX Crew-1 Mission 7:27pm EST

Jeff Goldstein
 

FYI Live Feed Link

Jeff G.

 

From: VPAS@groups.io <VPAS@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bird Taylor
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 5:16 PM
To: VPAS@groups.io
Subject: [VPAS] SpaceX Crew-1 Mission 7:27pm EST

 

Launchgazers,

Little over two hours to launch. Four are scheduled to launch on a Falcon-9 out of Florida up the East Coast in the Crew Dragon vehicle. It's being streamed live now:
SpaceX.com
https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/11/15/spacex-crew-1-mission-status-center/

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird


Orion SkyView Pro for Sale

Richard Saunders
 

Hi folks, 

I'm upgrading to a higher-end mount and wanted to give my BBAA friends a first shot at my old mount before I list it on Craigslist/Offer-up.

I'm selling as a bundle my SkyView Pro mount (299.99 new on Orion's web site), a new/unused polar alignment scope (69.99) and a new/unopened Orion TrueTrack dual axis electronic drive kit that I never installed (169.99).   The new value on telescope.com is $538.98.  If one of you wants the bundle I'd like $375.

Best regards,

Scott Saunders

(7587) 621-6328

rsaun58043@...


Re: Answer to the crater puzzle

jimcoble2000
 

Of course

On Thursday, November 12, 2020, 8:15:47 AM EST, preciousmyprecious via groups.io <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:


I was gonna say that

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 08:33:40 PM EST, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


In order, oldest to youngest

ABC

A has its circular rim broken by B, so A must predate B.

Now B and C are a bit harder.

All the craters are circular.  B's ring, though, appears to be truncated or flattened by the circular rim of C. C is quite round appearing. So B must have existed before C.

Hence ABC.

Notice also the rim of A appears to be more worn and rounded whereas the rims of B and C are sharper and less worn looking. So A is certainly the oldest by that standard. 


Re: Answer to the crater puzzle

preciousmyprecious
 

I was gonna say that

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


On Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 08:33:40 PM EST, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


In order, oldest to youngest

ABC

A has its circular rim broken by B, so A must predate B.

Now B and C are a bit harder.

All the craters are circular.  B's ring, though, appears to be truncated or flattened by the circular rim of C. C is quite round appearing. So B must have existed before C.

Hence ABC.

Notice also the rim of A appears to be more worn and rounded whereas the rims of B and C are sharper and less worn looking. So A is certainly the oldest by that standard. 

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