Date   

Re: A Pretty Pair

Ian Stewart
 

Figured you'd say that :-)

On 9/23/2020 4:54 PM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io wrote:
That's a nice pair Ian.....................................maybe I should reword that

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 4:00:29 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Here's a very nice pair of open clusters from last night in Cassiopeia. NGC457 is another one of my favorites - also called the ET cluster or The Owl cluster.
Cheers
Ian
https://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p383234709/hedfd2772#hedfd2772


Re: Observing the deep sky at high power

Kent Blackwell
 

I have always had a special place in my heart for refractors, starting with a 3" Unitron, then a 4" Unitron followed many years later with an 80mm f/8 triplet,  then a 100/900 triplet and now a 5" triplet. It's fun splitting double stars, something that can be done in bright city lights just as well, maybe better than dark sky sites. Why better? It's been my feeling cities offer steadier seeing. I ordered all the Vixen HR eyepieces back in July and have been enamored with all four; 3.4mm, 2.4mm, 2.0 mm and 1.6mm. It's too bad Vixen discontinued them due to poor sales.


Re: A Pretty Pair

Ted Forte
 

Great image Ian.

 

NGC 457 is one of my favorite open clusters too, it  always makes a hit at outreach events.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Stewart
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 1:00 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] A Pretty Pair

 

Here's a very nice pair of open clusters from last night in Cassiopeia. NGC457 is another one of my favorites - also called the ET cluster or The Owl cluster.
Cheers
Ian
https://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p383234709/hedfd2772#hedfd2772


Re: Observing the deep sky at high power

jimcoble2000
 

That's what Stan said. It was too late after I left your place to tackle it. It is getting big isn't it?

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 11:32:40 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I had a most incredible view of Mars last night at 1:00 am. It's really getting large in angular size. The southern polar cap was bright white but tiny.
 
Equally incredible was a view of NGC 7009, the Saturn Nebula, nicknamed because of it's squashed shape resembling the planet Saturn. I have never seen it like that, using a 3.4mm VIxen HR eyepiece yielding a whopping 933x! I tried that eyepiece on M57, The Ring Nebula. It nearly filled the entire field of view. I could not, however see the central star. Stepping down in power to ~only~ 630x I occasionally saw it with averted vision.

I also revisited Pease 1, a planetary nebula embedded within the glorious globular cluster, M 15 in Pegasus. It's a challenge to see. I normally don't like using nebula filters when the eyepiece exit pupil is smaller than 2 or 3mm but in this case I had to up the power to 500x. With that power as I blinked the Lumicon OIII filter the illusive stellar planetary popped into view. I was excited. Shall I shout it was the best I've ever seen it?


Re: Observing the deep sky at high power

jimcoble2000
 

oh.................neat Ian. Now you need to jump in there with us and try to get the last three Vixen eyepieces in the world. This is fun refractor sport

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 4:04:08 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Sounds like a great night Kent. I got a little time on NGC457. I have a little surprise coming in the mail. A 5 inch triplet. Yes something to keep me amused during images sessions besides the dob ... Cheers Ian


Re: A Pretty Pair

jimcoble2000
 

That's a nice pair Ian.....................................maybe I should reword that

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 4:00:29 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:


Here's a very nice pair of open clusters from last night in Cassiopeia. NGC457 is another one of my favorites - also called the ET cluster or The Owl cluster.
Cheers
Ian
https://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p383234709/hedfd2772#hedfd2772


Re: Like a phoenix...

jimcoble2000
 

This whole business is a drag

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 3:08:21 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


FYI – Many of you will remember Richard Berry – he is the author of several astronomy and telescope making books, many magazine articles, inventor of the “Cookbook Cameras” for astrophotography, and former editor of Astronomy magazine.  He and his wife Eleanor live in Lyons, Oregon, or rather they did – they recently lost their home to the wildfires there.  That’s horrible of course, but he seems to be trying to make the best of it.  This is his account, forwarded from the SiTech Servo mailing list.

Roy


Begin forwarded message:

From: Richard Berry <rberry@...>
Date: September 23, 2020 at 1:18:09 PM EDT
To: Sitechservo@groups.io
Subject: [Sitechservo] Like a phoenix...
Reply-To: Sitechservo@groups.io


Hi all--

Our house, shop, and barn burned to the ground. Total loss. We ate
lunch today at the Gingerbread House, taking a break from combing
through the ash for anything, but there's really nothing left. The
fire was very hot: it melted aluminum wire, telescope mount castings,
and even caused Pyrex telescope mirrors to flow.
 
We got a Level 3 alert at 2:30 am and were out of the house by 4:15,
driving through unbreathable air and smoke. The fire did not go past
Hwy 226, apparently because the wind stopped blowing at 40-50 mph
around dawn, otherwise the fire might have run all the way to Stayton.
We got to the State Fair grounds and waited there until about 9 am
when they suggested we might go to breakfast. On the way to Denny's,
one of Eleanor's poetry friends called to offer the use of her
"mother-in-law" apartment with a separate driveway and entrance. We
accepted. Our neighbors sneaked past the police the next day and
reported that our house was gone.
 
I did the AAVSO webinar because, well, life goes on. We're in contact 
with the insurance agent. I tossed my computer (no peripherals) into 
the car along with external HDDs and my 35 mm film negatives dating
back to 1962, and all of my  digital materials came out with us on the
drives. My observatory, in the middle of our pasture, also survived,
as did our three alpacas, now safely living on a small ranch run by
friends.
 
I don't know whether we'll rebuild at the old location. Hwy 22 has
become so noisy and heavily trafficked that it's not pleasant living
beside it, and taking care of an 8-acre place had become a bit too
much for the two of us. We had been wondering how we could downsize
our art, books, telescopes, and did not know what to do with the stuff
we had accumulated. We are now fully downsized, though not quite as we
had envisioned. We feel a sense of freedom from the burden of stuff.
We can take this opportunity to re-invent ourselves again. 

Richard

PS: In the shop building where I keep my telescopes, I found the burned
husk of my SiTech controller alongside the partially melted Mathis M500
mount and remains of the 14-inch EdgeHD that I was going to place in a
second small observatory. The 20-inch Dob was gone, the mirror split into
five pieces and partially melted. My lens of my 6-inch f/15 refractor broke
into a hundred little jewels. There's a certain beauty found amid the loss.
 
PPS: My direct email is rberry@....


Re: So weird!!!

Jim Tallman
 

Then again maybe not


On Sep 23, 2020 at 16:29, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:

Https:// vice http://  George


On Sep 23, 2020 at 12:42, vp <vp@...> wrote:

This is weird!  I can get into ANY website on the Internet, EXCEPT the BBAA website!

When I try to get into http://backbayastro.org, either on my laptop, my Chromebook, or my smartphone, I can't get in.

On the laptop I get this error message:

This site can’t be reached

The connection was reset.

Try:

  • Checking the connection
  • Checking the proxy and the firewall
  • Running Windows Network Diagnostics
ERR_CONNECTION_RESET

-------------------

On the smartphone I get this error message:

This site can’t be reached

temporarily down or it may have moved permanently to a 
new web address.

ERR_CONNECTION_ABORTED

-------------------

On the Chromebook I get

Your connection was interrupted

Your computer went to sleep.

ERR_NETWORK_IO_SUSPENDED

------------

(The Chromebook times out -- it gets tired of waiting for the link to come up.)

Anybody have any suggestions?

George

George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org





Re: So weird!!!

Jim Tallman
 

Https:// vice http://  George


On Sep 23, 2020 at 12:42, vp <vp@...> wrote:

This is weird!  I can get into ANY website on the Internet, EXCEPT the BBAA website!

When I try to get into http://backbayastro.org, either on my laptop, my Chromebook, or my smartphone, I can't get in.

On the laptop I get this error message:

This site can’t be reached

The connection was reset.

Try:

  • Checking the connection
  • Checking the proxy and the firewall
  • Running Windows Network Diagnostics
ERR_CONNECTION_RESET

-------------------

On the smartphone I get this error message:

This site can’t be reached

temporarily down or it may have moved permanently to a 
new web address.

ERR_CONNECTION_ABORTED

-------------------

On the Chromebook I get

Your connection was interrupted

Your computer went to sleep.

ERR_NETWORK_IO_SUSPENDED

------------

(The Chromebook times out -- it gets tired of waiting for the link to come up.)

Anybody have any suggestions?

George

George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org




Re: Observing the deep sky at high power

Ian Stewart
 

Sounds like a great night Kent. I got a little time on NGC457. I have a little surprise coming in the mail. A 5 inch triplet. Yes something to keep me amused during images sessions besides the dob ... Cheers Ian


A Pretty Pair

Ian Stewart
 

Here's a very nice pair of open clusters from last night in Cassiopeia. NGC457 is another one of my favorites - also called the ET cluster or The Owl cluster.
Cheers
Ian
https://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p383234709/hedfd2772#hedfd2772


Like a phoenix...

Roy Diffrient
 

FYI – Many of you will remember Richard Berry – he is the author of several astronomy and telescope making books, many magazine articles, inventor of the “Cookbook Cameras” for astrophotography, and former editor of Astronomy magazine.  He and his wife Eleanor live in Lyons, Oregon, or rather they did – they recently lost their home to the wildfires there.  That’s horrible of course, but he seems to be trying to make the best of it.  This is his account, forwarded from the SiTech Servo mailing list.

Roy


Begin forwarded message:

From: Richard Berry <rberry@...>
Date: September 23, 2020 at 1:18:09 PM EDT
To: Sitechservo@groups.io
Subject: [Sitechservo] Like a phoenix...
Reply-To: Sitechservo@groups.io


Hi all--

Our house, shop, and barn burned to the ground. Total loss. We ate
lunch today at the Gingerbread House, taking a break from combing
through the ash for anything, but there's really nothing left. The
fire was very hot: it melted aluminum wire, telescope mount castings,
and even caused Pyrex telescope mirrors to flow.
 
We got a Level 3 alert at 2:30 am and were out of the house by 4:15,
driving through unbreathable air and smoke. The fire did not go past
Hwy 226, apparently because the wind stopped blowing at 40-50 mph
around dawn, otherwise the fire might have run all the way to Stayton.
We got to the State Fair grounds and waited there until about 9 am
when they suggested we might go to breakfast. On the way to Denny's,
one of Eleanor's poetry friends called to offer the use of her
"mother-in-law" apartment with a separate driveway and entrance. We
accepted. Our neighbors sneaked past the police the next day and
reported that our house was gone.
 
I did the AAVSO webinar because, well, life goes on. We're in contact 
with the insurance agent. I tossed my computer (no peripherals) into 
the car along with external HDDs and my 35 mm film negatives dating
back to 1962, and all of my  digital materials came out with us on the
drives. My observatory, in the middle of our pasture, also survived,
as did our three alpacas, now safely living on a small ranch run by
friends.
 
I don't know whether we'll rebuild at the old location. Hwy 22 has
become so noisy and heavily trafficked that it's not pleasant living
beside it, and taking care of an 8-acre place had become a bit too
much for the two of us. We had been wondering how we could downsize
our art, books, telescopes, and did not know what to do with the stuff
we had accumulated. We are now fully downsized, though not quite as we
had envisioned. We feel a sense of freedom from the burden of stuff.
We can take this opportunity to re-invent ourselves again. 

Richard

PS: In the shop building where I keep my telescopes, I found the burned
husk of my SiTech controller alongside the partially melted Mathis M500
mount and remains of the 14-inch EdgeHD that I was going to place in a
second small observatory. The 20-inch Dob was gone, the mirror split into
five pieces and partially melted. My lens of my 6-inch f/15 refractor broke
into a hundred little jewels. There's a certain beauty found amid the loss.
 
PPS: My direct email is rberry@....


Re: So weird!!!

Ted Forte
 

Broke for me too, George.

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of vp
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 9:41 AM
To: president backbayastro.org <president@...>; treasurer <treasurer@...>; Abraham Goldstein <jeffgold1@...>; webmaster backbayastro.org <webmaster@...>; Groups.io BBAA <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] So weird!!!

 

This is weird!  I can get into ANY website on the Internet, EXCEPT the BBAA website!

 


So weird!!!

vp
 

This is weird!  I can get into ANY website on the Internet, EXCEPT the BBAA website!

When I try to get into http://backbayastro.org, either on my laptop, my Chromebook, or my smartphone, I can't get in.

On the laptop I get this error message:

This site can’t be reached

The connection was reset.

Try:

  • Checking the connection
  • Checking the proxy and the firewall
  • Running Windows Network Diagnostics
ERR_CONNECTION_RESET

-------------------

On the smartphone I get this error message:

This site can’t be reached

temporarily down or it may have moved permanently to a 
new web address.

ERR_CONNECTION_ABORTED

-------------------

On the Chromebook I get

Your connection was interrupted

Your computer went to sleep.

ERR_NETWORK_IO_SUSPENDED

------------

(The Chromebook times out -- it gets tired of waiting for the link to come up.)

Anybody have any suggestions?

George

George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org



Observing the deep sky at high power

Kent Blackwell
 

I had a most incredible view of Mars last night at 1:00 am. It's really getting large in angular size. The southern polar cap was bright white but tiny.
 
Equally incredible was a view of NGC 7009, the Saturn Nebula, nicknamed because of it's squashed shape resembling the planet Saturn. I have never seen it like that, using a 3.4mm VIxen HR eyepiece yielding a whopping 933x! I tried that eyepiece on M57, The Ring Nebula. It nearly filled the entire field of view. I could not, however see the central star. Stepping down in power to ~only~ 630x I occasionally saw it with averted vision.

I also revisited Pease 1, a planetary nebula embedded within the glorious globular cluster, M 15 in Pegasus. It's a challenge to see. I normally don't like using nebula filters when the eyepiece exit pupil is smaller than 2 or 3mm but in this case I had to up the power to 500x. With that power as I blinked the Lumicon OIII filter the illusive stellar planetary popped into view. I was excited. Shall I shout it was the best I've ever seen it?


Re: An observing milestone

Kent Blackwell
 

My grandmother used to say, "haven't you seen everything in the sky? My gosh, that was 35 years ago and I'm still not running out of things to look at. I EVEN look at some of them twice....or 3 times....or 4 times...bla bla bla. And you all know what I say when I see an object after having seen it before, right?


Re: An observing milestone

Ted Forte
 

Hey Ron,

 

Make that Arizona not New Mexico, and sure, any BBAA’er, past, present, or future would be welcome at the “Desert Coyote Observatory” (I purchased the observatory, inherited the name).

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron Robisch
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 7:01 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] An observing milestone

 

It has indeed been a long time, Ted!  I miss the days of observing with you and Kent and everyone else down in Coinjock.  I always get the BackBayAstro digests, but 99% of the time I skip or delete along with so many other emails.  I just happen to look at one yesterday and saw your post.  

I can not imagine what viewing with a 30" from New Mexico skies must be like.  I mean, I'm trying to imagine it, and I just can't.  You are living the dream!  If I ever get to New Mexico, can I visit?

Clear skies,
Ron


Re: An observing milestone

Ron Robisch
 

It has indeed been a long time, Ted!  I miss the days of observing with you and Kent and everyone else down in Coinjock.  I always get the BackBayAstro digests, but 99% of the time I skip or delete along with so many other emails.  I just happen to look at one yesterday and saw your post.  

I can not imagine what viewing with a 30" from New Mexico skies must be like.  I mean, I'm trying to imagine it, and I just can't.  You are living the dream!  If I ever get to New Mexico, can I visit?

Clear skies,
Ron


The Wizard

Ian Stewart
 

A wonderful evening last night. Got some time on an object I just can't resist this time of year - NGC7380 the Wizard Nebula. Let's have more nights like this!
Cheers
Ian
The Wizard


Re: An observing milestone

vp
 

Congratulations, Ted!  You are truly a glutton for punishment.

George
On September 20, 2020 12:22 PM Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.


Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 


Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.


After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.


I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!


While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 


Ted







George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org


1241 - 1260 of 53282