Date   

Re: An observing milestone

Ted Forte
 

Hi Ron

 

It’s been a long time, my friend.

 

Some of it was with the 18, and a little with my 8-inch SCT, but quite a bit of this was done with my 30-inch Dob in my backyard observatory.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron Robisch
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 6:40 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] An observing milestone

 

Ted, that is truly a mind-numbing accomplishment!  Is that all with your 18"?

-Ron


Herschel data

Ted Forte
 

Now that I’ve mostly wrapped up my Herschel project, I thought I’d share my compilation of data on WH’s objects.  The attached spreadsheet was built with the intent to share. I attach it here for anyone that might have an interest.

 

There are seven tabs:

 

“List “ is my compilation of the 2,517 objects I included in the project.  The information is from various sources, but primarily Wolfgang Steinicke. The objects that comprise the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 400” and “Herschel II” are marked.  The NGC 2000 descriptions are included. Any errors are mine.

 

“Non-Existent” are those Herschel-discovered NGC’s that the RNGC listed as non-existent.  Most of the explanations/resolutions are from Harold Corwin

 

“Steinicke Adds” contains 63 objects that the NGC/IC Project (mostly Wolfgang) determined should be credited to WH

 

“Steinicke Stars” are objects that Herschel described as nebulae but are just stars. This is mostly from Steinicke but much informed by Corwin

 

“Discovery” dates from various websites

 

“Notes” – My notes compiled from readings about the Herschel list. The facts are compiled from a number of sources including Steve Gottlieb’s and Harold Corwin’s webpages among others and various Steinicke publications.

 

“A.L. List” is the data on the 2,383 objects that comprise their approved “Herschel 2500” for Herschel Society recognition.

 

Enjoy or delete as your heart desires.

 

Ted


Re: An observing milestone

Ron Robisch
 

Ted, that is truly a mind-numbing accomplishment!  Is that all with your 18"?

-Ron


Re: An observing milestone

RapidEye
 

That is truly amazing Ted - congrats!


On Sun, Sep 20, 2020, 12:22 PM Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.

 

Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 

 

Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.

 

After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.

 

I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!

 

While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 

 

Ted

 

 

 

 

 


Re: An observing milestone

charles jagow
 

Congrats Ted, very hazy from the smoke here on the mountain

Sent from Chuck's iPhone

On Sep 20, 2020, at 10:22, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:



Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.

 

Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 

 

Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.

 

After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.

 

I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!

 

While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 

 

Ted

 

 

 

 

 


Re: An observing milestone

Ted Forte
 

Ha! Roy.  Never out of deep sky objects.  I’m working toward observing all of the NGC (at least the 96% the rise above my horizon) and then there is the IC of course.  My count so far is 5,662 NGC and 550 IC in the bag.  That’s not to mention the few thousand non NGC/IC deep sky items that have found their way into the eyepiece. The Herschel stuff was just a side trip.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2020 9:48 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] An observing milestone

 

Congrat’s Ted!  Sure seems like you’ve been working on that longer than 2 years though.  So is that it?  Gonna sell out and move to town now?  Or do you have another big observing project in mind?

 

Roy

 

 

From: Ted Forte

Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2020 12:22 PM

Subject: [BackBayAstro] An observing milestone

 

Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.

 

Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 

 

Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.

 

After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.

 

I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!

 

While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 

 

Ted

 

 

 

 

 


Re: An observing milestone

Ian Stewart
 

Great achievement Ted. Congratulations.

Cheers

Ian

On 9/20/2020 12:22 PM, Ted Forte wrote:

Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.

 

Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 

 

Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.

 

After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.

 

I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!

 

While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 

 

Ted

 

 

 

 

 


Re: An observing milestone

Roy Diffrient
 

Congrat’s Ted!  Sure seems like you’ve been working on that longer than 2 years though.  So is that it?  Gonna sell out and move to town now?  Or do you have another big observing project in mind?
 
Roy
 
 

From: Ted Forte
Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2020 12:22 PM
Subject: [BackBayAstro] An observing milestone
 

Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.

 

Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 

 

Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.

 

After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.

 

I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!

 

While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 

 

Ted

 

 

 

 

 


An observing milestone

Ted Forte
 

Greetings from BBAA west.  Arizona’s sky has been suffering from the smoke.  We had a few nights with good clarity last weekend, but most nights are marred by a haze.   It was yet another night of reduced transparency here last night, but this time the seeing was also rather poor. In my last few observing sessions this month, the poor transparency has been offset by better than average seeing.  Last night, there were few redeeming features and when the wind started to pick up, I had had quite enough and so I quit rather early.

 

Before I did, however, I achieved a milestone. I finally logged my last Herschel object. 

 

Anyone trying to observe the whole of Herschel’s “non-stellar” discoveries has to make some selections. I had settled on a list of 2,517 objects.   Nominally, the list is 2,500 items long, which is the sum of the objects published in Herschel’s three catalogs.  But, many of the objects published in the catalogs were duplicate observations of the same nebulae, and some have been lost or never really existed.  So that reduces the list somewhat.  For instance, the Astronomical League’s “Herschel 2500” is actually only 2,383 objects long.

 

After trimming away the published objects that don’t belong, you can then re-expand the list by adding those objects that were very likely discovered but never published, and also add to the list those objects that were credited to other discoverers but probably rightly belong to Sir William. The final tally is usually agreed to be in the range of 2,513 to 2,517 objects.  For the most part, I have accepted Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke as the final word on what does or does not belong.

 

I’ve been waiting months for my final unseen Herschel object to come around. I logged, IC 1339, a 14.3 magnitude galaxy in Cap, first thing last night – and with it put the Herschel 2500 project to bed! And it only took me 28.5 years!

 

While that is technically true, I really only assigned myself the goal of completing the Herschel 2500 a couple of years ago, so perhaps I’m not quite the slacker that that 28.5 year span suggests. 

 

Ted

 

 

 

 

 


Re: SQM Readings from Verde Mont Observatory.

Matthew Cook
 

I’m heading down to Ocracoke the weekend of 10/9 if you want some dark sky readings by proxy Kent...;)


On Sep 18, 2020, at 11:40, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

Well, darn, I barely get a reading of 18.00 here in good 'ole Virginia Beach. I just can't imagine a sky that dark. The only way I can get a dark reading like that is if I go in my observing shed, close the door and turn out all the lights. Closing my eyes helps, too.


Garden Stars Thursday 24 September

vp
 

Garden Stars is scheduled for this coming Thursday, 24 September, at 8:00 pm.  Once again, I will be out of town that night, so Ron Neale has graciously agreed to take my place as the presenter.  Thanks, Ron.

We will still need a few BBAA members with telescopes out on the back patio of the NBG building to show Jupiter and Saturn and the Moon (I don't think Mars will be high enough to see over the building).

Have a great night, and pray for no clouds or rain.

George

George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org



Re: SQM Readings from Verde Mont Observatory.

Kent Blackwell
 

Well, darn, I barely get a reading of 18.00 here in good 'ole Virginia Beach. I just can't imagine a sky that dark. The only way I can get a dark reading like that is if I go in my observing shed, close the door and turn out all the lights. Closing my eyes helps, too.


Re: SQM Readings from Verde Mont Observatory.

Ted Forte
 

Wow, those are incredible skies, Chuck! That's DARK. I've never ben anywhere that would read 22.0 (except at sea).

The haze is pretty bad here in Arizona but could be worse. I had two pretty clear nights but then last night the transparency was way down again.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of charles jagow
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2020 3:51 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] SQM Readings from Verde Mont Observatory.


Eyes popped open at 0415 went outside to check the haze.

The country’s wildfires are really wreaking havoc with our skies out here. Last night after coming home at 2100 I could barely see Jupiter.

Back to this morning, the skies are clear, may be some haze but I can see Orion hunting for game in all his glory. It is 42 degrees and I am out there in shorts. Not long though. I went in and grabbed the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) and headed back outside.

Pointing straight up I observed the following readings:
21.88
21.90
21.89
21.93
21.90
21.89
21.92

If I canted it slightly away from the Milky Way I peaked at 22.03 but most were 21.92 and 21.93.

So it seems very dark.

Did I mention all the damn stars? OMG.

I hope by this time next year to have Verde Mont Observatory built.

Maybe tonight it won’t be so hazy before midnight and I can do some observing with the ETX LS-6 up here on the mountain.

Elevation of where the Verde Mont Observatory will be is 8,858 feet.

Hope you kids are enjoying the storm!

Sent from Chuck's iPhone
Somewhere in the Sangre De Cristo
mountains near Westcliffe CO.




--
*v/r*

*Chuck Jagow*

*Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers ( http://www.backbayastro.org/ )*

*Rott'n Paws Observatory ( http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm )*

*N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512 ( http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm )*


Re: SQM Readings from Verde Mont Observatory.

jimcoble2000
 

Be nice, don't rub it in!

Have a great visit (all except the 42 degree part). Take care Chuck

On Friday, September 18, 2020, 6:51:10 AM EDT, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



Eyes popped open at 0415 went outside to check the haze.

The country’s wildfires are really wreaking havoc with our skies out here.  Last night after coming home at 2100 I could barely see Jupiter.

Back to this morning, the skies are clear, may be some haze but I can see Orion hunting for game in all his glory.  It is 42 degrees and I am out there in shorts.  Not long though.  I went in and grabbed the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) and headed back outside.

Pointing straight up I observed the following readings:
  21.88
  21.90
  21.89
  21.93
  21.90
  21.89
  21.92

If I canted it slightly away from the Milky Way I peaked at 22.03 but most were 21.92 and 21.93.

So it seems very dark.

Did I mention all the damn stars?  OMG.

I hope by this time next year to have Verde Mont Observatory built.

Maybe tonight it won’t be so hazy before midnight and I can do some observing with the ETX LS-6 up here on the mountain.

Elevation of where the Verde Mont Observatory will be is 8,858 feet.

Hope you kids are enjoying the storm!

Sent from Chuck's iPhone
  Somewhere in the Sangre De Cristo
  mountains near Westcliffe CO.




--
*v/r*

*Chuck Jagow*

*Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers ( http://www.backbayastro.org/ )*

*Rott'n Paws Observatory ( http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm )*

*N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512 ( http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm )*





SQM Readings from Verde Mont Observatory.

charles jagow
 

Eyes popped open at 0415 went outside to check the haze.

The country’s wildfires are really wreaking havoc with our skies out here. Last night after coming home at 2100 I could barely see Jupiter.

Back to this morning, the skies are clear, may be some haze but I can see Orion hunting for game in all his glory. It is 42 degrees and I am out there in shorts. Not long though. I went in and grabbed the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) and headed back outside.

Pointing straight up I observed the following readings:
21.88
21.90
21.89
21.93
21.90
21.89
21.92

If I canted it slightly away from the Milky Way I peaked at 22.03 but most were 21.92 and 21.93.

So it seems very dark.

Did I mention all the damn stars? OMG.

I hope by this time next year to have Verde Mont Observatory built.

Maybe tonight it won’t be so hazy before midnight and I can do some observing with the ETX LS-6 up here on the mountain.

Elevation of where the Verde Mont Observatory will be is 8,858 feet.

Hope you kids are enjoying the storm!

Sent from Chuck's iPhone
Somewhere in the Sangre De Cristo
mountains near Westcliffe CO.




--
*v/r*

*Chuck Jagow*

*Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers ( http://www.backbayastro.org/ )*

*Rott'n Paws Observatory ( http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm )*

*N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512 ( http://www.jagowds.com/_jap/jap.htm )*


Re: Skywatch tonight

vp
 

We were glad to have you at Skywatch, Jonathan.  I'm glad you got to look through other members' scopes and talk to them.  I'm sorry I didn't get to interact with you very much.  I hope to see you at a lot of our events in the future.  Welcome to the club!

George
On September 13, 2020 9:59 AM Jonathan Scheetz <jonathan@...> wrote:


I had a great time at the watch last night.  Thanks to everyone for letting me look through your scopes.  Dark Skies do make a difference - I saw many things with my scope last night that I haven't been able to see from home.
I was thrilled to be able to see some markings on mars and to make out the very small polar ice cap.  Best viewing of the Andromeda galaxy so far.  The double cluster looked fantastic in my 2" 40mm EP. 
A lot of unexpected views last night - like seeing the blue snowball nebula thru Stan's 10 inch dob. 
I enjoyed the evening very much.
I am retired now and hope to spend more time participating the group and learning more about Astronomy.

George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org



Mars observation

jimcoble2000
 

Weird observing last night. Clouds cleared but no stars seen and Mars didn't look right. Today I can see why. Smoke from California/Oregon fires blocking the skies.


Life on Venus?

Ted Forte
 

The Royal Astronomical Society is right now announcing the detection of phosphene gas in the atmosphere of Venus and suggesting that it is evidence of an existing life cycle (microbes) currently in the atmosphere of the planet!

 

Ted


Re: [VPAS] One for the books tonight

Ted Forte
 

Sounds like a fantastic night!  Congrats on a remarkable observation.

 

Kent, you might remember May 10, 2007 at Coinjock.  We viewed Saturn in your 25 and saw, what I described in my notes as the “Encke Minima” as well as the outer ring of Saturn! It is the only mention of the feature in my notes.

 

As for the Crepe ring, that’s rare too, but I’ve noted it 17 times in various telescopes in the last 30 years.

 

Ted

 

From: VPAS@groups.io <VPAS@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2020 8:35 PM
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>; vpas@groups.io
Subject: [VPAS] One for the books tonight

 

Two nice nights of observing. NWRP was fun, if soaking wet.

 

Tonight there was an observational first for me in a few decades of observing. We were in Kent's back yard doing doubles under iffy skies with passing clouds all night but seeing was astonishing. We went to Saturn and I hate to say this, as that quote "the best I've ever seen" is far overused too much to have real meaning; but tonight it really did apply. Seeing was so steady that I was able to use the superlative Vixen HR 2.4mm in my planetary 5 inch scope to observe Saturn at 406x. This is the first time I have ever seen the Enke division in the rings. The outer rings looked like an LP record groove. It was astonishing. The Crepe ring was so easy to see on the inside. The huge disc of the planet was 3 dimensional and shaded. A lifetime view for sure that made the night. Really.

 

It is hard to bring that kind of power to bear without the image falling apart. I am not at all sure you can truly appreciate the Vixen HR eyepiece until you take it to the very edge of performance. When everything else would break down the image, it holds. Too bad this eyepiece is no longer available and the series generally is too powerful for most scopes to use. It is rare to find one on the used market now.


Re: One for the books tonight

jimcoble2000
 

Good luck. How is Dee doing?

On Monday, September 14, 2020, 9:47:01 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Sounds rare and amazing.  Also way better than the clouds and showers here.  I have hope for tomorrow night, maybe even tonight.


On Sep 14, 2020, at 9:04 AM, S. Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


As soon as I looked at Saturn at 475x I a suspected "phono groves" type appearance, especially towards The Crepe Ring area. Wow, then Mark and I occasionally seeing the outermost ring. Wow, it's the best I've ever seen it!

The 2.0mm Vixen HR was my first eyepiece in the line back in July. After splitting doubles like no other eyepiece I ordered the 3.4mm, 2.4mm and 1.6mm. All very useful on my 4" & 5" refractors.

Kent

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: kentblackwell <kent@...>, Roy Diffrient <mail@...>, BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>, "vpas@groups.io" <vpas@groups.io>
Subject: One for the books tonight
Date: Mon, 14 Sep 2020 03:34:56 +0000 (UTC)

Two nice nights of observing. NWRP was fun, if soaking wet.

Tonight there was an observational first for me in a few decades of observing. We were in Kent's back yard doing doubles under iffy skies with passing clouds all night but seeing was astonishing. We went to Saturn and I hate to say this, as that quote "the best I've ever seen" is far overused too much to have real meaning; but tonight it really did apply. Seeing was so steady that I was able to use the superlative Vixen HR 2.4mm in my planetary 5 inch scope to observe Saturn at 406x. This is the first time I have ever seen the Enke division in the rings. The outer rings looked like an LP record groove. It was astonishing. The Crepe ring was so easy to see on the inside. The huge disc of the planet was 3 dimensional and shaded. A lifetime view for sure that made the night. Really.

It is hard to bring that kind of power to bear without the image falling apart. I am not at all sure you can truly appreciate the Vixen HR eyepiece until you take it to the very edge of performance. When everything else would break down the image, it holds. Too bad this eyepiece is no longer available and the series generally is too powerful for most scopes to use. It is rare to find one on the used market now.

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