Date   

Re: Solar report

jimcoble2000
 

There are a couple of hot spots that I assume coincide with sunspots

On Tuesday, August 4, 2020, 11:29:44 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


 I hope everyone survived the storm early this morning. We had a lot of branches fall but nothing major. 

 There’s one nice prominence on the eastern limb of the sun and a couple of filaments.  I haven’t checked in white light  yet to see if there are any sunspots. 


Solar report

Kent Blackwell
 

 I hope everyone survived the storm early this morning. We had a lot of branches fall but nothing major. 

 There’s one nice prominence on the eastern limb of the sun and a couple of filaments.  I haven’t checked in white light  yet to see if there are any sunspots. 


Forgot the attachment

jimcoble2000
 

Mars view at 2 in the morning (Nasa Image)


Mars this morning

jimcoble2000
 

Was up at 2:30 to take in Mars as we had a clear sky for the first time in a week. Temperature was 78 with 87 percent humidity but it felt much cooler in the breeze. I have attached a planet simulator view from NASA as a picture is worth a thousand words. This was definitely the view in good seeing and transparency.

Mars is riding quite high in the sky this year as it approaches opposition in October. It is quite easy to observe now, aside from the early hour. Did I say it was nice to be retired? At 234X. Using a Mars type 2 filter from Televue (now discontinued) the view matched the attachment. Too bad these filters are no longer available as they really do help the planet's appearance. The disc is easily large enough to spot whatever detail the seeing allows.

This is the last good opposition in the coming decade so take advantage of it while you can.


PN Program back up coordinator

Ted Forte
 

Dear BBAAers,

Is anyone out there interested in being backup coordinator for the Astronomical League Planetary Nebula Program?

I’ve coordinated the program since its inception and I intend to continue in that role indefinitely.  However, it makes sense to have someone that is prepared to step up in the event that I can no longer do it.  Georgie June was the original backup and I never asked for anyone to fill that role after she passed away.  The PN Program is technically a BBAA managed program and so I’m coming to BBAA first. If no one is interested, I’m sure I can find a backup coordinator among the members of my Arizona Club (HAC) but I assume that would sever the BBAA’s association with the program.

While I’m still at the helm, the backup need only be willing to take over the program should it become necessary, stay aware of the League procedures, be familiar with the PN program rules, and keep a backup copy of the Excel spreadsheet I use to record awardees. (I’d send you an updated copy each time I issue an award).

If you had to take over, I’m sure that Aaron Clevenson at the League will give you all the help you need to get up to speed, and make the necessary notifications and web page changes.  It’s not that much of a commitment – the program doesn’t get that many submissions (half a dozen a year or so). 

The coordinator is responsible for the management of the program. Below is the pertinent portion of the “Job Description” provided by the League.  (I’ll discuss the specifics with and answer the questions of the volunteer).

Please contact me off-list: tedforte511@... if you are interested.

Thanks,

Ted

 

Responding to Observing Program Inquiries:

Inquiries should be responded to as soon as possible. You should at least acknowledge receipt with an “I’ll get back to you shortly.” message if necessary. It is preferable to use email when possible to avoid mailing costs. Remember that you are a representative of the AL, be professional and courteous. Responses should be consistent with the Observing Program’s webpages. If the inquiry is beyond the scope of the Observing Program, please forward it on to an NOPD to be addressed.

Responding to Submissions:

Submissions should be handled as soon as possible. But, within a month!

Your job as Observing Program Coordinator is to confirm that the member has followed the instructions and done all of the requirements. We are not police and do not have to check every bit of data. The reality is that these programs are largely on the Honor System.

The process:

1. Review the materials submitted.

2. If the observations do not meet the requirements: a. Determine what needs to be done to meet the requirements.

b. Inform the submitter of what needs to be done for certification.

 

3. If the observations meet the requirements: a. Confirm that the submitter is a member in good standing of the AL (except for the Herschel 400 Observing Program and the Sky Puppy Observing Program). This can be done by sending an email to Mitch at rosters@... with the information you have about the submitter (Name, Astronomy Club, address, phone, email, etc.). The extra information is in case there is more than one person with the same name.

b. Create a certificate and envelope to send to the submitter. Include a pin as appropriate. This should be done within one month of receiving the submission unless there are problems to be corrected by the submitter. If this is a problem for the primary coordinator, then the backup coordinator should assist in meeting this deadline. Please contact an NOPD to discuss the situation if there are issues.

c. Update the Reflector as requested (for each issue). Details are at the end of this document.

d. Update the AL on-line database with the new information. This is a critical step. This can be done monthly, or at the time that you send the information in to the Reflector. Details are at the end of this document.

 

 

 

 


Saturday SUN Day August 1

George Reynolds
 

Did anyone go to SUN Day today?  My granddaughter Evelyn had a sleepover with us last night and we had activities today, so I did not attend.

If you were there, please let me know, and you can either complete an event report in our NSN calendar or tell me how many club members and how many visitors were there.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Last of the great Mars oppositions for this decade

jimcoble2000
 


Garden Stars TONIGHT! (Thursday, 7/30/2020)

George Reynolds
 

 Garden Stars is a GO for TONIGHT, Thursday, 7/30, at 8:30 pm.  I will have a brief PowerPoint presentation indoors, and then we will move outside to look through telescopes.  I hope some members can participate.

We will be practicing social distancing insofar as possible, and will need a few telescopes to show the guests the Moon and planets.  Jupiter and Saturn will be rising in the east, and I hope we can see them above the trees and the NBG building.

George


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


Re: My phone is broken

George Reynolds
 

I took my phone to a repair shop today.  They'll call me tomorrow with a diagnosis and estimate.


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


On Wednesday, July 29, 2020, 10:36:03 AM EDT, David <waggs1955@...> wrote:


Sorry to hear about your phone.  Any idea when it will be fixed/replaced?


On Jul 28, 2020, at 8:58 AM, George Reynolds <pathfinder027@...> wrote:


My cell phone broke yesterday, and until I can get it fixed or get a replacement, I can be reached by email here or at the following email addresses:  vp@... or pathfinder027@....


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


AAVSO Webinar this Saturday

Richard W Roberts
 

Dear friends, 

We hope you are enjoying our FREE Observing Sections' Webinar Series, discussing citizen astronomy with the AAVSO! Coming up in AUGUST:
 
Long Period Variables (August 1st  REGISTER HERE)     
     Schedule:

  • Introduction – Rich Roberts
  • Dark Skies, Bright Kids – Abby Waggoner (UVA)
  • LPV Maser Campaign – Dr. Michael Stroh (Northwestern)
  • R Aqr – Dr. Margarita Karovska (Harvard)
  • Q & A

(Panelists and presentations are to be announced for the following)

Short Period Pulsator (Aug. 8th  – REGISTER HERE)

Photoelectric Photometry (Aug. 15th  – REGISTER HERE)
   
Spectroscopy (Aug. 22nd  – REGISTER HERE)

Young Stellar Objects (Aug. 29th  – REGISTER HERE)

More on our 2020 webinar series can be found here. This series of webinars is open to you all: AAVSO members, observers, and those not yet familiar with AAVSO. Whether you are a new observer exploring variable types, or a seasoned observer branching out, each webinar is a great opportunity for you all to expand your knowledge, connect with one another, and deepen and grow your communities. Please also share this experience with your friends and colleagues. 
 
Best wishes – clear skies,
 
                                                              
​Stella Kafka
AAVSO Director     
                               
       
Help the AAVSO

 

 

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Re: More filter thoughts

Kent Blackwell
 

After reading all that my brain hurts.

--- jimcoble2000@... wrote:

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
To: Roy Diffrient <mail@...>, kentblackwell <kent@...>, BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>, "vpas@groups.io" <vpas@groups.io>
Subject: More filter thoughts
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2020 16:30:01 +0000 (UTC)

I thought I might have mis recalled about The idea of cyanogen filtering so I went today to get my Lumicon fliter box. On the back they write in the band passes and percentages and sure enough list cyanogen as 511 and 514 nm bandpass at 95 and 96% transmission. So Lumicon too was incorrect mistaking cyanogen with Swan carbon bands. Thought I might have lost my marbles for a second.


More filter thoughts

jimcoble2000
 

I thought I might have mis recalled about The idea of cyanogen filtering so I went today to get my Lumicon fliter box. On the back they write in the band passes and percentages and sure enough list cyanogen as 511 and 514 nm bandpass at 95 and 96% transmission. So Lumicon too was incorrect mistaking cyanogen with Swan carbon bands. Thought I might have lost my marbles for a second.


Filter thoughts

jimcoble2000
 

You know my experience with that comet filter got me to thinking about some of the claims of it's use as a cyanogen filter. As you know, most times the filter does not work on comets but occassionally it seems to work on the odd comet, as it certainly does on this comet. But when I saw improvement using the filter on M27 it got my mind to thinking is this really correct, that it screens for cyanogen?

Supposedly this selects for the cyanogen emission line, but wait. Cyanogen ( N≡C−C≡N) emits in the 350 nm range,  below human visual limits which cut off at 380nm. It would make no sense to select for this line of transmission in a filter. This is at the start of the ultraviolet range which is invisible to the eye. I think the idea of a "cyanogen" filter is a misnomer. Now the green or bluish color as noted by both Kent and myself may be more attributable to the "Swan Bands" of the spectrum for carbon up around 550nm, well within range of human vision.

 If the comet filter did select close to the UV range (supposed cyanogen) that very marginally could explain some improvement in planetary nebula which is gas excited by UV radiation from the central star of such nebula. I think the effect though should be small to invisible due to the marginal nature of enhancement at the edge of visual range.

Looking at the filter's specs it also passes in the ionized oxygen range. It does not select for less than 500nm. That fits nicely with what I saw and is close to the swan bands of carbon.

The commonly held idea of a cyanogen source of the comets green tint or a filter that selects for this is wrong.

I may get several filters and use my diffraction grating to look at band pass of several types compared to the "comet filter".


Re: Comet viewing.

jimcoble2000
 

I admire your dedication going to NEVADA for a week end. That sounds about right for the tail. We were able to see it from Kent's back yard last night and the filter does help a whole lot. I could see it barely naked eye using the one power finder as a guide (without it I would never find it). Oddly the comet filter also works quite well on M-27. Go figure...............................

On Tuesday, July 28, 2020, 11:37:39 AM EDT, Jeff Goldstein <jeffgold1@...> wrote:


I took a weekend trip to Black Rock, Nevada.  The comet was a bummer for my observing in the high Nevada desert on Friday evening.  You saw it much better than I did.  Absolutely no naked eye comet observation from there as I had hoped for a Bortle 2 sky. 

 

There was smoke from the current California fires that made the transparency very difficult in all directions.  The sky ended up as Bortle 4 as predicted from my cell phone app that night.  But I did see the comet and noticed the tail was about half the field of my 7.1 degree 7x50 binoculars. A telescope and filter as you described, Mark would have been great!

 

Jeff Goldstein

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 8:09 AM
To: BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>; vpas@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Comet viewing.

 

Went over to Kent's place around 2030. The sky was hard to read as usual with some clear patches and some cloudy areas. Lately the sky has been terrible as has the weather forecast. Extreme heat and haze have dominated the weather with no rain to clean up the sky.

 

The north was somewhat hazy with thin clouds moving very slowly eastward. Not the worst we have seen. No air movement meant no oxygen to breathe. Bugs were off and on. 200% humidity.

 

Finding the comet was easy tonight as it is now higher in the NW. The tail was visible in the haze with averted vision and extended a fair ways out. Broad. If it had been clear it would have been easy. 1st quarter moon did not help things and it was low in the haze to the west. Pretty good though. Kent had time to get out his 4 inch telescope so we got a closer look the the head. I went and got my Comet filter, which highlights Cyanogen CN gas. Comets produce CN naturally but most of the time the filter does not work. Comets are of two types; dusty and gaseous. The dusty ones show no improvement with the filter. The Gassy ones can. Boy did the filter work on this one. It just lit it up! Unusual for it to be so effective. I have used the filter to broaden the head or bring out the tail on comets that allow it. It did not help the tail much on this one but boy did it extend and brighten the head. I also used the filter in front of one eyepiece of the binoculars to very good effect making the head much brighter. It did not improve the tail though.

 

Pretty good night for the city. I would love to see this one in a dark sky. My best views have been in the morning a couple of weeks ago.

 


Re: Comet viewing.

Jeff Goldstein
 

I took a weekend trip to Black Rock, Nevada.  The comet was a bummer for my observing in the high Nevada desert on Friday evening.  You saw it much better than I did.  Absolutely no naked eye comet observation from there as I had hoped for a Bortle 2 sky. 

 

There was smoke from the current California fires that made the transparency very difficult in all directions.  The sky ended up as Bortle 4 as predicted from my cell phone app that night.  But I did see the comet and noticed the tail was about half the field of my 7.1 degree 7x50 binoculars. A telescope and filter as you described, Mark would have been great!

 

Jeff Goldstein

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 8:09 AM
To: BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>; vpas@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Comet viewing.

 

Went over to Kent's place around 2030. The sky was hard to read as usual with some clear patches and some cloudy areas. Lately the sky has been terrible as has the weather forecast. Extreme heat and haze have dominated the weather with no rain to clean up the sky.

 

The north was somewhat hazy with thin clouds moving very slowly eastward. Not the worst we have seen. No air movement meant no oxygen to breathe. Bugs were off and on. 200% humidity.

 

Finding the comet was easy tonight as it is now higher in the NW. The tail was visible in the haze with averted vision and extended a fair ways out. Broad. If it had been clear it would have been easy. 1st quarter moon did not help things and it was low in the haze to the west. Pretty good though. Kent had time to get out his 4 inch telescope so we got a closer look the the head. I went and got my Comet filter, which highlights Cyanogen CN gas. Comets produce CN naturally but most of the time the filter does not work. Comets are of two types; dusty and gaseous. The dusty ones show no improvement with the filter. The Gassy ones can. Boy did the filter work on this one. It just lit it up! Unusual for it to be so effective. I have used the filter to broaden the head or bring out the tail on comets that allow it. It did not help the tail much on this one but boy did it extend and brighten the head. I also used the filter in front of one eyepiece of the binoculars to very good effect making the head much brighter. It did not improve the tail though.

 

Pretty good night for the city. I would love to see this one in a dark sky. My best views have been in the morning a couple of weeks ago.

 


My phone is broken

George Reynolds
 

My cell phone broke yesterday, and until I can get it fixed or get a replacement, I can be reached by email here or at the following email addresses:  vp@... or pathfinder027@....


George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


See 7 planets next 12 days.

Roy Diffrient
 

All of them except Pluto (for me, it’ll always be a planet) and Earth, because we’re standing on it.  At least for those with good horizons and not too many clouds or thick haze.



Re: Seahorse Nebula

jimcoble2000
 

I did once at sea. I can't describe it. You had to be there.

On Monday, July 27, 2020, 6:17:05 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Wish I could see that many stars.  Thanks Ian, great shot.

Roy


On Jul 27, 2020, at 3:24 PM, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:

Got a little imaging time in last night. Not great conditions but at least you could see stars. Needs more integration time for sure and some camera tilt in the some where but here is a look at the head of the seahorse nebula a dark nebula in the constellation Cepheus ... Cheers Ian
Seahorse Nebula


Re: Seahorse Nebula

jimcoble2000
 

Yes Chuck, not even close. Kempsville either!

I think Coinjock may do it..... maybe, maybe not.

I know that night in West Virginia around Greenbank surely could. My memory is a bit foggy but I do know we tried the Snake Nebula multiple times from Pungo and I am not sure if we ever succeeded really, even back in the first days when it was a lot darker. Those were the M-13 naked eye days. I suspect long past now.

The problem is you need a wide field but big objective or mirror and that combination is rare. I do remember John of Richmond (not to be confused with John Richmond!) had an unusual very short focal length telescope for the size of aperture that certainly would have done it in Coinjock. The milky way was quite bright in it.

B-86 is the easiest obvious one to see.

On Monday, July 27, 2020, 5:50:58 PM EDT, charles jagow <chuck@...> wrote:


Very nice, I don’t think I even have a prayer at something like that from Greenbrier.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, July 27, 2020 at 3:24 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Seahorse Nebula

 

Got a little imaging time in last night. Not great conditions but at least you could see stars. Needs more integration time for sure and some camera tilt in the some where but here is a look at the head of the seahorse nebula a dark nebula in the constellation Cepheus ... Cheers Ian
Seahorse Nebula


Re: Seahorse Nebula

Roy Diffrient
 

Wish I could see that many stars.  Thanks Ian, great shot.

Roy


On Jul 27, 2020, at 3:24 PM, Ian Stewart <swampcolliecoffee@...> wrote:

Got a little imaging time in last night. Not great conditions but at least you could see stars. Needs more integration time for sure and some camera tilt in the some where but here is a look at the head of the seahorse nebula a dark nebula in the constellation Cepheus ... Cheers Ian
Seahorse Nebula

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