Date   

Comet Neowise Rising: The Movie

Roy Diffrient
 

Great time-lapse video by Tom Polakis.


Roy


More Jupiter Thoughts

jimcoble2000
 

You can see why the equatorial zone (EZ) looks so red and dark this year on Christopher Go's web site. It really is amazing considering how accurate and detailed the camera is that you can get the big picture visually with a little patience. The green filter helps a lot on fine detail. You just have to overlook the color. I still like to see it it's natural colors but then switch to the filter. The difference is remarkable in what you can see in green.


Last night observing

jimcoble2000
 

Observing last night from the balcony. I suspect seeing would have been good but high clouds and haze dropped the transparency a notch or two. Nevertheless I was able to observe Jupiter for some time. Seeing as I said was not bad but not nearly as good as it might have been without the haze. The equatorial zone continues to look very red. I checked Christopher Go's web site and sure enough the Northern belt is very turbulent with a huge red festoon that extends completely into the equatorial zone (EZ). It is so big I suspect some will confuse it for the red spot which lies in the other belt. The southern belt has it's usual dark color but is not nearly so perturbed. There was no red spot or anything of note going on. I spent most of the night trying to achieve focus but was never completely satisfied. Saturn was brief. Titan and rhea were the two most visible satellites. The others were not visible. The moon was observed for a minute but seeing once again combined with a lot of illumination made my visit brief.

I did get up at 445 to see if it was clear enough for the comet but even Venus was barely visible in thick haze. It has been hot and quite hazy lately.


Christopher Go's web site for Jupiter: Jupiter 2020 by Chris Go




Re: Early morning comet

jimcoble2000
 

Good job Ted. So do we !!

On Tuesday, July 7, 2020, 10:02:56 AM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


I was out at 3:45.  We had a little cloud here this morning, but nothing that interfered with any important target.  I think the comet looked even better this morning.  The tail is certainly better seen- extends 2 - 3 degrees from the core and the bifurcation is more visible. Looks great in the 18x50’s and in the 10-inch!  This is a really beautiful comet – I really wish it was in our night sky.

 

Ted

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 5:28 AM
To: backbayastro@groups.io; BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Early morning comet

 

I agree totally. I was up too (I should have texted you right away). Hopeless in the thick haze. No opportunity for the rest of the week. The last week has been like looking through a cream soup.

 

On Tuesday, July 7, 2020, 8:22:47 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

I awakened this morning at 4:00 am. Yes, kiddies you heard me right, 4:00 am to look for Comet Neosporin (that's my name for it). The sky was clear near the moon, which was in the western sky but thick with haze elsewhere, so I did the only thing a sane person would do; went back to bed. I think I'll follow my own advice and wait for it to be in the western sky after sunset in a couple of weeks.

By the way, a side effect of Neosporin is itchiness. I have no itchiness to repeat getting up at that hour again.

Kent


Re: Early morning comet

Ted Forte
 

I was out at 3:45.  We had a little cloud here this morning, but nothing that interfered with any important target.  I think the comet looked even better this morning.  The tail is certainly better seen- extends 2 - 3 degrees from the core and the bifurcation is more visible. Looks great in the 18x50’s and in the 10-inch!  This is a really beautiful comet – I really wish it was in our night sky.

 

Ted

 

 

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 5:28 AM
To: backbayastro@groups.io; BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Early morning comet

 

I agree totally. I was up too (I should have texted you right away). Hopeless in the thick haze. No opportunity for the rest of the week. The last week has been like looking through a cream soup.

 

On Tuesday, July 7, 2020, 8:22:47 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

I awakened this morning at 4:00 am. Yes, kiddies you heard me right, 4:00 am to look for Comet Neosporin (that's my name for it). The sky was clear near the moon, which was in the western sky but thick with haze elsewhere, so I did the only thing a sane person would do; went back to bed. I think I'll follow my own advice and wait for it to be in the western sky after sunset in a couple of weeks.

By the way, a side effect of Neosporin is itchiness. I have no itchiness to repeat getting up at that hour again.

Kent


Re: Early morning comet

jimcoble2000
 

I agree totally. I was up too (I should have texted you right away). Hopeless in the thick haze. No opportunity for the rest of the week. The last week has been like looking through a cream soup.

On Tuesday, July 7, 2020, 8:22:47 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


I awakened this morning at 4:00 am. Yes, kiddies you heard me right, 4:00 am to look for Comet Neosporin (that's my name for it). The sky was clear near the moon, which was in the western sky but thick with haze elsewhere, so I did the only thing a sane person would do; went back to bed. I think I'll follow my own advice and wait for it to be in the western sky after sunset in a couple of weeks.

By the way, a side effect of Neosporin is itchiness. I have no itchiness to repeat getting up at that hour again.

Kent


Early morning comet

Kent Blackwell
 

I awakened this morning at 4:00 am. Yes, kiddies you heard me right, 4:00 am to look for Comet Neosporin (that's my name for it). The sky was clear near the moon, which was in the western sky but thick with haze elsewhere, so I did the only thing a sane person would do; went back to bed. I think I'll follow my own advice and wait for it to be in the western sky after sunset in a couple of weeks.

By the way, a side effect of Neosporin is itchiness. I have no itchiness to repeat getting up at that hour again.

Kent


Re: July 5 2020 Solar Report

Kent Blackwell
 

I'm sorry, I'm trying my very best to get the sun active again but nothing seems to work. I figure a number of you out there probably spent large sums of money for H-alpha telescopes recently and that, dear reader, is the reason. Thanks a lot!


Re: July 5 2020 Solar Report

jimcoble2000
 

you have failed me for the last time

On Sunday, July 5, 2020, 8:48:33 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


Solar report for July 5, 2020: Save yourself time setting up a solar telescope. Go do something else because there is no visible solar activity (again) today. 

Kent Blackwell


July 5 2020 Solar Report

Kent Blackwell
 

Solar report for July 5, 2020: Save yourself time setting up a solar telescope. Go do something else because there is no visible solar activity (again) today. 

Kent Blackwell


Re: Happy Independence Day

jimcoble2000
 

Same to you Ian. Stay safe.

On Saturday, July 4, 2020, 1:11:22 PM EDT, Ian Stewart <ian@...> wrote:


Happy 4 th everyone. Looks like a late night fire and scotch fir this evening.
Cheers
Ian


On Jul 4, 2020, at 11:27 AM, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Happy July 4th fellow stargazers. Many of the local and national fireworks displays have been cancelled due to COVID-19. Apparently the same goes for solar activity on this beautiful day. Nothing in the way of prominences in H-alpha light and ZERO sunspots in white light. In other words, a totally boring sun. But that doesn't mean it's a bad day to get out and enjoy the sunshine.


Re: Happy Independence Day

Ian Stewart
 

Happy 4 th everyone. Looks like a late night fire and scotch fir this evening.
Cheers
Ian


On Jul 4, 2020, at 11:27 AM, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Happy July 4th fellow stargazers. Many of the local and national fireworks displays have been cancelled due to COVID-19. Apparently the same goes for solar activity on this beautiful day. Nothing in the way of prominences in H-alpha light and ZERO sunspots in white light. In other words, a totally boring sun. But that doesn't mean it's a bad day to get out and enjoy the sunshine.


Re: Neowise, the game's afoot

jimcoble2000
 

Glad to be alive!Emoji

On Saturday, July 4, 2020, 10:21:27 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Awesome, Mark!  Wow, Knott’s Island at 4 am, what an effort! Glad it worked out.

Roy


On Jul 4, 2020, at 6:02 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Aside from sounding like a tenth generation Matrix prequel, the comet Neowise has chosen the worst hour and the poorest elevation to make a debut in the northern hemisphere.

Oh well; the greater the challenge the greater the glory.

It has been a couple of decades since I went on the comet hunt early in the morning on the moors. Got up at 3 after having loaded the car last night with 20x80 binoculars, tripod mount and one pair of Vixen Constellation binoculars, other wise known as Blackwell Nerd Glasses. The comet was not due to rise until around 4 but I wanted to be on station at the McKay Island Bridge early. This is a pretty fair drive at a very early hour. No traffic but the potential to hit wildlife is high at that hour on the rural roads heading for Knot's Island, the intellectual capitol of coastal North Carolina. I figured by 4 in the morning all the local color had finished their night of whatever they do so things would stay bolted for the time it took to see the comet. Any hour before 2 though and all bets are off.

There was a nice breeze that kept the mosquitoes at bay. There you are surrounded by marsh but the horizon is down to the deck 360 degrees. Ideal comet hunting ground. Only two other cars passed my spot after arrival at 0345, both heading towards the island. Even with a full moon the eastern sky was fairly good.

4 planets stretched in an arc across the sky. Venus low down and red in the haze preceded by Mars higher up and red on it's own (no haze needed). Mars was following Jupiter and Saturn with the moon right below all of them, off the plane of the solar system by a bit. If you ever want to know here you stand, go find a flat horizon in all directions and then pick a time when the most planets are available. Impressive and rarely seen so plainly due to limited horizons in town.

Marsh noises are astounding when no one else is around or other sounds to drown them out.

There was a bit of time before the comet was due to rise so I swept Cassiopeia just wandering. Conditions low down were a bit hazy and not ideal but I could still see the lower stars in Auriga with the binoculars. The moon was setting and turning a gold color so it did it's best to get out of the way.

Around 0415 I spotted the comet in the haze. I can't say much about it due to the conditions and low altitude but I suspect it would be quite bright higher up in a dark sky. Easily seen. At low altitudes I had to carefully sweep to locate it. Cant say if there was a tail or not due to conditions. The sky starts to lighten around 4 and really gets going at 5 so the window is pretty fine to see the comet. But even with having to be satisfied with merely detecting it, the setting and early hour adventure was worth the time. I left at 0430. The moon was now on the horizon a deep deep red color. I spotted it off West Neck Creek Road Bridge on the return leg home.It is 6 now and I am going back to bed.


Happy Independence Day

Kent Blackwell
 
Edited

Happy July 4th fellow stargazers. Many of the local and national fireworks displays have been cancelled due to COVID-19. Apparently the same goes for solar activity on this beautiful day. Nothing in the way of prominences in H-alpha light and ZERO sunspots in white light. In other words, a totally boring sun. But that doesn't mean it's a bad day to get out and enjoy the sunshine.


Re: Neowise, the game's afoot

Roy Diffrient
 

Awesome, Mark!  Wow, Knott’s Island at 4 am, what an effort! Glad it worked out.

Roy


On Jul 4, 2020, at 6:02 AM, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:


Aside from sounding like a tenth generation Matrix prequel, the comet Neowise has chosen the worst hour and the poorest elevation to make a debut in the northern hemisphere.

Oh well; the greater the challenge the greater the glory.

It has been a couple of decades since I went on the comet hunt early in the morning on the moors. Got up at 3 after having loaded the car last night with 20x80 binoculars, tripod mount and one pair of Vixen Constellation binoculars, other wise known as Blackwell Nerd Glasses. The comet was not due to rise until around 4 but I wanted to be on station at the McKay Island Bridge early. This is a pretty fair drive at a very early hour. No traffic but the potential to hit wildlife is high at that hour on the rural roads heading for Knot's Island, the intellectual capitol of coastal North Carolina. I figured by 4 in the morning all the local color had finished their night of whatever they do so things would stay bolted for the time it took to see the comet. Any hour before 2 though and all bets are off.

There was a nice breeze that kept the mosquitoes at bay. There you are surrounded by marsh but the horizon is down to the deck 360 degrees. Ideal comet hunting ground. Only two other cars passed my spot after arrival at 0345, both heading towards the island. Even with a full moon the eastern sky was fairly good.

4 planets stretched in an arc across the sky. Venus low down and red in the haze preceded by Mars higher up and red on it's own (no haze needed). Mars was following Jupiter and Saturn with the moon right below all of them, off the plane of the solar system by a bit. If you ever want to know here you stand, go find a flat horizon in all directions and then pick a time when the most planets are available. Impressive and rarely seen so plainly due to limited horizons in town.

Marsh noises are astounding when no one else is around or other sounds to drown them out.

There was a bit of time before the comet was due to rise so I swept Cassiopeia just wandering. Conditions low down were a bit hazy and not ideal but I could still see the lower stars in Auriga with the binoculars. The moon was setting and turning a gold color so it did it's best to get out of the way.

Around 0415 I spotted the comet in the haze. I can't say much about it due to the conditions and low altitude but I suspect it would be quite bright higher up in a dark sky. Easily seen. At low altitudes I had to carefully sweep to locate it. Cant say if there was a tail or not due to conditions. The sky starts to lighten around 4 and really gets going at 5 so the window is pretty fine to see the comet. But even with having to be satisfied with merely detecting it, the setting and early hour adventure was worth the time. I left at 0430. The moon was now on the horizon a deep deep red color. I spotted it off West Neck Creek Road Bridge on the return leg home.It is 6 now and I am going back to bed.


Re: [VPAS] Neowise, the game's afoot

jimcoble2000
 

You can't know how I had to restrain myself from texting at that hour!

On Saturday, July 4, 2020, 7:20:39 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


That's fantastic, I'm impressed! But I can't say I wish I'd been with you. Uncle Kent will wait until it's high in the sky and at a convenient time God (or Pat Robertson) did not mean for us to be up at that hour.

6 Plus

On Jul 4, 2020, at 6:02 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Aside from sounding like a tenth generation Matrix prequel, the comet Neowise has chosen the worst hour and the poorest elevation to make a debut in the northern hemisphere.

Oh well; the greater the challenge the greater the glory.

It has been a couple of decades since I went on the comet hunt early in the morning on the moors. Got up at 3 after having loaded the car last night with 20x80 binoculars, tripod mount and one pair of Vixen Constellation binoculars, other wise known as Blackwell Nerd Glasses. The comet was not due to rise until around 4 but I wanted to be on station at the McKay Island Bridge early. This is a pretty fair drive at a very early hour. No traffic but the potential to hit wildlife is high at that hour on the rural roads heading for Knot's Island, the intellectual capitol of coastal North Carolina. I figured by 4 in the morning all the local color had finished their night of whatever they do so things would stay bolted for the time it took to see the comet. Any hour before 2 though and all bets are off.

There was a nice breeze that kept the mosquitoes at bay. There you are surrounded by marsh but the horizon is down to the deck 360 degrees. Ideal comet hunting ground. Only two other cars passed my spot after arrival at 0345, both heading towards the island. Even with a full moon the eastern sky was fairly good.

4 planets stretched in an arc across the sky. Venus low down and red in the haze preceded by Mars higher up and red on it's own (no haze needed). Mars was following Jupiter and Saturn with the moon right below all of them, off the plane of the solar system by a bit. If you ever want to know here you stand, go find a flat horizon in all directions and then pick a time when the most planets are available. Impressive and rarely seen so plainly due to limited horizons in town.

Marsh noises are astounding when no one else is around or other sounds to drown them out.

There was a bit of time before the comet was due to rise so I swept Cassiopeia just wandering. Conditions low down were a bit hazy and not ideal but I could still see the lower stars in Auriga with the binoculars. The moon was setting and turning a gold color so it did it's best to get out of the way.

Around 0415 I spotted the comet in the haze. I can't say much about it due to the conditions and low altitude but I suspect it would be quite bright higher up in a dark sky. Easily seen. At low altitudes I had to carefully sweep to locate it. Cant say if there was a tail or not due to conditions. The sky starts to lighten around 4 and really gets going at 5 so the window is pretty fine to see the comet. But even with having to be satisfied with merely detecting it, the setting and early hour adventure was worth the time. I left at 0430. The moon was now on the horizon a deep deep red color. I spotted it off West Neck Creek Road Bridge on the return leg home.It is 6 now and I am going back to bed.


Re: Neowise, the game's afoot

Kent Blackwell
 

That's fantastic, I'm impressed! But I can't say I wish I'd been with you. Uncle Kent will wait until it's high in the sky and at a convenient time God (or Pat Robertson) did not mean for us to be up at that hour.

6 Plus

On Jul 4, 2020, at 6:02 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Aside from sounding like a tenth generation Matrix prequel, the comet Neowise has chosen the worst hour and the poorest elevation to make a debut in the northern hemisphere.

Oh well; the greater the challenge the greater the glory.

It has been a couple of decades since I went on the comet hunt early in the morning on the moors. Got up at 3 after having loaded the car last night with 20x80 binoculars, tripod mount and one pair of Vixen Constellation binoculars, other wise known as Blackwell Nerd Glasses. The comet was not due to rise until around 4 but I wanted to be on station at the McKay Island Bridge early. This is a pretty fair drive at a very early hour. No traffic but the potential to hit wildlife is high at that hour on the rural roads heading for Knot's Island, the intellectual capitol of coastal North Carolina. I figured by 4 in the morning all the local color had finished their night of whatever they do so things would stay bolted for the time it took to see the comet. Any hour before 2 though and all bets are off.

There was a nice breeze that kept the mosquitoes at bay. There you are surrounded by marsh but the horizon is down to the deck 360 degrees. Ideal comet hunting ground. Only two other cars passed my spot after arrival at 0345, both heading towards the island. Even with a full moon the eastern sky was fairly good.

4 planets stretched in an arc across the sky. Venus low down and red in the haze preceded by Mars higher up and red on it's own (no haze needed). Mars was following Jupiter and Saturn with the moon right below all of them, off the plane of the solar system by a bit. If you ever want to know here you stand, go find a flat horizon in all directions and then pick a time when the most planets are available. Impressive and rarely seen so plainly due to limited horizons in town.

Marsh noises are astounding when no one else is around or other sounds to drown them out.

There was a bit of time before the comet was due to rise so I swept Cassiopeia just wandering. Conditions low down were a bit hazy and not ideal but I could still see the lower stars in Auriga with the binoculars. The moon was setting and turning a gold color so it did it's best to get out of the way.

Around 0415 I spotted the comet in the haze. I can't say much about it due to the conditions and low altitude but I suspect it would be quite bright higher up in a dark sky. Easily seen. At low altitudes I had to carefully sweep to locate it. Cant say if there was a tail or not due to conditions. The sky starts to lighten around 4 and really gets going at 5 so the window is pretty fine to see the comet. But even with having to be satisfied with merely detecting it, the setting and early hour adventure was worth the time. I left at 0430. The moon was now on the horizon a deep deep red color. I spotted it off West Neck Creek Road Bridge on the return leg home.It is 6 now and I am going back to bed.


Neowise, the game's afoot

jimcoble2000
 

Aside from sounding like a tenth generation Matrix prequel, the comet Neowise has chosen the worst hour and the poorest elevation to make a debut in the northern hemisphere.

Oh well; the greater the challenge the greater the glory.

It has been a couple of decades since I went on the comet hunt early in the morning on the moors. Got up at 3 after having loaded the car last night with 20x80 binoculars, tripod mount and one pair of Vixen Constellation binoculars, other wise known as Blackwell Nerd Glasses. The comet was not due to rise until around 4 but I wanted to be on station at the McKay Island Bridge early. This is a pretty fair drive at a very early hour. No traffic but the potential to hit wildlife is high at that hour on the rural roads heading for Knot's Island, the intellectual capitol of coastal North Carolina. I figured by 4 in the morning all the local color had finished their night of whatever they do so things would stay bolted for the time it took to see the comet. Any hour before 2 though and all bets are off.

There was a nice breeze that kept the mosquitoes at bay. There you are surrounded by marsh but the horizon is down to the deck 360 degrees. Ideal comet hunting ground. Only two other cars passed my spot after arrival at 0345, both heading towards the island. Even with a full moon the eastern sky was fairly good.

4 planets stretched in an arc across the sky. Venus low down and red in the haze preceded by Mars higher up and red on it's own (no haze needed). Mars was following Jupiter and Saturn with the moon right below all of them, off the plane of the solar system by a bit. If you ever want to know here you stand, go find a flat horizon in all directions and then pick a time when the most planets are available. Impressive and rarely seen so plainly due to limited horizons in town.

Marsh noises are astounding when no one else is around or other sounds to drown them out.

There was a bit of time before the comet was due to rise so I swept Cassiopeia just wandering. Conditions low down were a bit hazy and not ideal but I could still see the lower stars in Auriga with the binoculars. The moon was setting and turning a gold color so it did it's best to get out of the way.

Around 0415 I spotted the comet in the haze. I can't say much about it due to the conditions and low altitude but I suspect it would be quite bright higher up in a dark sky. Easily seen. At low altitudes I had to carefully sweep to locate it. Cant say if there was a tail or not due to conditions. The sky starts to lighten around 4 and really gets going at 5 so the window is pretty fine to see the comet. But even with having to be satisfied with merely detecting it, the setting and early hour adventure was worth the time. I left at 0430. The moon was now on the horizon a deep deep red color. I spotted it off West Neck Creek Road Bridge on the return leg home.It is 6 now and I am going back to bed.


Re: Improving eyesight

Bird Taylor
 

Stargazers,

Make your own light. Adafruit has red LED packs of 25 for only $4. Red wavelength of 660nm. Easy-peazy:

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Jul 3, 2020, at 18:15 02, jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

good try anyway

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 6:11:59 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light

 

Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans.

 

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/jun/declining-eyesight-improved-looking-deep-red-light

 
 

Sorry – your red LED doesn’t cut it – read to the end - the article mentions that there are no commercially available flashlights at the required 670nm wavelength.

 

Ted



Re: Improving eyesight

Bird Taylor
 

Stargazers,

I found another article that states they used 670nm, but suggest 650-1000nm, and their flashlights cost about £12 pounds.


Here is the medical article. I don’t have free access and am too cheap to buy the article for $50:

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Jul 3, 2020, at 18:44 49, Bird Taylor <birdtaylor@...> wrote:

Stargazers,

Found a source that lists Photon, Rigel, and several other light specifications:

Photon Freedom red 630nm:
<Photon Freedom Red.png>

Rigel Red:
<Rigel Systems Red.png>

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird

On Jul 3, 2020, at 18:30 14, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

There are probably cheaper lights than the one I referenced – which is just the first one that came up on DuckDuckGo, but most of them on the web are 460nm or below and the paper specified 670nm for a benefit. 
 
Ted
 
From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bird Taylor
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:22 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Cc: vpas@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Improving eyesight
 
Hey Ted,
 
The articles that I’ve read spec out 670nm wavelength and their test lights were only about $15. I’ve started with my Photon Freedoms. I haven’t found out the lumen level or even distance from the eye, yet, or even the Photon frequency. What the heck?
 
I guess all those years of observing with Bob and his constant flashing me with his bright red headlamps were only his attempt at giving me better color vision and higher visual acuity. Thanks, Bob.
 
Clear Dark Skies,
Bird


On Jul 3, 2020, at 18:15 21, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:
 
 
Caveat emptor!
 
 
 
From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ted Forte via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:12 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Improving eyesight
 
Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light
 
Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans.
 
 
 
Sorry – your red LED doesn’t cut it – read to the end - the article mentions that there are no commercially available flashlights at the required 670nm wavelength. 
 
Ted
 



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