Date   

Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

jimcoble2000
 

Chuck, you are not a Jedi yet!


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 2:25:40 PM EDT, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:


Roy,

 

You said “The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors” that lead me to think your 28” was not a Newt.  You know how us youngsters get, easily confused.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 1:23 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

Yes Chuck, I have a 28” f/3.6 Newtonian.  Why confused?

 

Roy

 



On Jun 22, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



Roy,

 

I am confused, isn’t your 28 a Newtonian reflector?  Or a Roytonian Reflector?

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 12:29 PM
To: <backbayastro@groups.io>, <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

sneak out Roy

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

 

 

Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

 

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

 

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Latest Image M57

Stu Beaber
 

Got out last night and ducked and dogged clouds early while fiddling with collimation on the 10"...When done it had cleared enough to grab a quick one on M57. What a pleasure to do something bright again!

Stu


Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

Roy Diffrient
 

Excuse my lack of subject clarity – I was referring to your Ostahowski primary and my Ostahowski secondary.  Put them together and we’d have an unpronounceable telescope.  “Osta–who–ski?”

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 2:25 PM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



Roy,

 

You said “The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors” that lead me to think your 28” was not a Newt.  You know how us youngsters get, easily confused.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 1:23 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

Yes Chuck, I have a 28” f/3.6 Newtonian.  Why confused?

 

Roy

 



On Jun 22, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



Roy,

 

I am confused, isn’t your 28 a Newtonian reflector?  Or a Roytonian Reflector?

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 12:29 PM
To: <backbayastro@groups.io>, <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

sneak out Roy

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

 

 

Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

 

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

 

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

charles jagow
 

Roy,

 

You said “The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors” that lead me to think your 28” was not a Newt.  You know how us youngsters get, easily confused.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Roy Diffrient <mail@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 1:23 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

Yes Chuck, I have a 28” f/3.6 Newtonian.  Why confused?

 

Roy

 



On Jun 22, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



Roy,

 

I am confused, isn’t your 28 a Newtonian reflector?  Or a Roytonian Reflector?

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 12:29 PM
To: <backbayastro@groups.io>, <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

sneak out Roy

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

 

 

Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

 

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

 

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 



Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

Bird Taylor
 

Hey Chuck,

How much is the new base? I have a dead what I believe is a XX12g. I bought it years ago from a family down in OBX. They’d left it in the rain and the particle board absorbed the water and swelled up destroying the mount. If you’re going to kick your old base to the curb, let me know how much you’d charge for me to carry it away. I’ve started designing a new base, but haven’t started cutting anything, yet. Shoot, I don’t even know if the motors or electronics work.

Clear Dark Skies,
Bird



On Jun 22, 2020, at 12:39 51, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

Roy,
 
I am confused, isn’t your 28 a Newtonian reflector?  Or a Roytonian Reflector?
 
 
From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 12:29 PM
To: <backbayastro@groups.io>, <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020
 
sneak out Roy
 
On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote: 
 
 
Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  
 
But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"
 

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well.  

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


-- 

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


-- 
v/r
Chuck Jagow

 



Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

Roy Diffrient
 

Yes Chuck, I have a 28” f/3.6 Newtonian.  Why confused?

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 12:39 PM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:



Roy,

 

I am confused, isn’t your 28 a Newtonian reflector?  Or a Roytonian Reflector?

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 12:29 PM
To: <backbayastro@groups.io>, <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

sneak out Roy

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

 

 

Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

 

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

 

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Planet late nights

jimcoble2000
 

EmojiEmoji

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 12:39:34 PM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Our run of clear skies continues – although the smoke is reaching a bit higher along the northern horizon.  I started at sunset trying (unsuccessfully) to catch a .8 day old moon.  After dark I continued logging NGC galaxies – completing Virgo and moving into Coma.

 

Pretty good seeing last night – which I was able to enjoy to the fullest after removing the clear plastic dust cap from my 13mm Ethos.  My first few looks through that eyepiece almost convinced me to quit before I started, but after realizing that the improvement by switching eyepeieces was just a little too stark – I discovered the cap.  Duh. One does feel a little stupid at times.

 

Ted

 

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2020 9:28 AM
To: Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Cc: Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: Planet late nights

 

No guests?

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 8:13:11 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

First of all, thank goodness no one was seriously hurt in the fire and you sustained zero damage.

 

The only planets we saw were Jupiter and Saturn on our ride home from the campground. Bob and I got things ship/shape in our camping trailer and I tried observing later but clouds hampered. We had a big rainstorm around 5:00 pm and that made things very wet with humidity. My scope was drenched from same. Seeing was excellent though. M 5, M 57 M 12, M 10 & M 13 were unbelievable! So was Comet PANSTARRS. Wow, what a great comet! I also saw some faint galaxies but mainly stuck to show objects to share with Bob. 

 

 

 

6 Plus


On Jun 22, 2020, at 7:29 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Like Chuck I too was up most of the night with the planets. An exciting day with a serious fire  in one of the first floor apartments here. Came back from the store to around three ambulances and 4 fire trucks in the parking lot. Fortunately the fire was confined to the apartment which was in the same wing as mine.

 

The clean up crews were working until very late into the night as I was observing from my second floor balcony.

 

Jupiter and Saturn were in the south. Seeing was actually quite good. The second floor gets above ground effects on seeing and can provide very good views. I spent an hour on each planet, from 11 to 1 in the morning. City observing can actually have quite good seeing if not darkness. The reds spot was on the face of Jupiter with very well defined belts. I was using my 5 inch refractor on an equatorial mount. This takes up half the balcony but is quite doable. Very good detail was possible in the steady air. Spent time with Jupiter using a 3x Barlow and a combination of 16mm and 12mm Brandon orthoscopic eyepieces. I prefer old design orthos with less glass for planet work. That combination gives me about 183x with a narrow field, just fine with an equatorial mount.  I also was using a Vernonscope  56 Green filter. The green filter can enhance contrast on the planet revealing subtle details and gradations not easily seen in reflected light. It can be subtle but it is there to be seen with patience. I typically spend one hour straight on each planet. Eye drops help too as it is easy to get dry eye looking at on thing hard for that time.

 

I suppose there should be a warning for color filters. Most colored filters are of very limited use on planets only. Typical ones (the majority) such as Orion and other companies are produced with very poor glass blanks. That is why they are inexpensive. These ones induce optical aberrations to the point of making the view far worse than no filter at all. A couple of manufacturers, Vernonscope and Baader Planetarium do make higher cost filters with the best glass substrates that do not screw up the view. They cost considerably more though. Too many beginners buy a poor set of filters as an accessory to the purchase and they wind up disappointing.

 

Saturn was razor sharp. The C ring obvious as a dark line across the disc and the planet banding, more subtle than Jupiter's was good. An 85 salmon orange filter helps with bands.

 

Mars: The Mars season has begun. It is still a bit small but I started observing at 3 in the morning. Mars rides higher than the other two planets so is better placed but still an early morning object. As I started to observe fog rolled in as the top of the cell tower down the road disappeared. That is great news for planet observers. Fog is very stable air, fixed at one temperature. Water has an interesting property. When two phases, gas and liquid are simultaneously present such as fog or boiling water, the temperature is fixed. It cant go up or down. (you can make more bubbles by turning up the stove but the water gets no hotter, 100C is it). Energy saving tip! Fog is the same. Until the sun heats it, wherever it is at that is where it is. Excellent seeing. Mars showed very fine detail at considerable power, 417x. No dust storms. A clear atmosphere with good albedo features. At that magnification the disc offers a good view. It will be largest in October. This is the one planet that requires filters to see anything but very general features. I use a Televue type B Mars filter.


Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

charles jagow
 

Roy,

 

I am confused, isn’t your 28 a Newtonian reflector?  Or a Roytonian Reflector?

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Monday, June 22, 2020 at 12:29 PM
To: <backbayastro@groups.io>, <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

 

sneak out Roy

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:

 

 

Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

 

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

 

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Planet late nights

Ted Forte
 

Our run of clear skies continues – although the smoke is reaching a bit higher along the northern horizon.  I started at sunset trying (unsuccessfully) to catch a .8 day old moon.  After dark I continued logging NGC galaxies – completing Virgo and moving into Coma.

 

Pretty good seeing last night – which I was able to enjoy to the fullest after removing the clear plastic dust cap from my 13mm Ethos.  My first few looks through that eyepiece almost convinced me to quit before I started, but after realizing that the improvement by switching eyepeieces was just a little too stark – I discovered the cap.  Duh. One does feel a little stupid at times.

 

Ted

 

From: Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...>
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2020 9:28 AM
To: Kent Blackwell <kent@...>
Cc: Ted Forte <tedforte511@...>; Roy Diffrient <mail@...>; BBAA Groups Io <backbayastro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: Planet late nights

 

No guests?

 

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 8:13:11 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:

 

 

First of all, thank goodness no one was seriously hurt in the fire and you sustained zero damage.

 

The only planets we saw were Jupiter and Saturn on our ride home from the campground. Bob and I got things ship/shape in our camping trailer and I tried observing later but clouds hampered. We had a big rainstorm around 5:00 pm and that made things very wet with humidity. My scope was drenched from same. Seeing was excellent though. M 5, M 57 M 12, M 10 & M 13 were unbelievable! So was Comet PANSTARRS. Wow, what a great comet! I also saw some faint galaxies but mainly stuck to show objects to share with Bob. 

 

 

 

6 Plus


On Jun 22, 2020, at 7:29 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Like Chuck I too was up most of the night with the planets. An exciting day with a serious fire  in one of the first floor apartments here. Came back from the store to around three ambulances and 4 fire trucks in the parking lot. Fortunately the fire was confined to the apartment which was in the same wing as mine.

 

The clean up crews were working until very late into the night as I was observing from my second floor balcony.

 

Jupiter and Saturn were in the south. Seeing was actually quite good. The second floor gets above ground effects on seeing and can provide very good views. I spent an hour on each planet, from 11 to 1 in the morning. City observing can actually have quite good seeing if not darkness. The reds spot was on the face of Jupiter with very well defined belts. I was using my 5 inch refractor on an equatorial mount. This takes up half the balcony but is quite doable. Very good detail was possible in the steady air. Spent time with Jupiter using a 3x Barlow and a combination of 16mm and 12mm Brandon orthoscopic eyepieces. I prefer old design orthos with less glass for planet work. That combination gives me about 183x with a narrow field, just fine with an equatorial mount.  I also was using a Vernonscope  56 Green filter. The green filter can enhance contrast on the planet revealing subtle details and gradations not easily seen in reflected light. It can be subtle but it is there to be seen with patience. I typically spend one hour straight on each planet. Eye drops help too as it is easy to get dry eye looking at on thing hard for that time.

 

I suppose there should be a warning for color filters. Most colored filters are of very limited use on planets only. Typical ones (the majority) such as Orion and other companies are produced with very poor glass blanks. That is why they are inexpensive. These ones induce optical aberrations to the point of making the view far worse than no filter at all. A couple of manufacturers, Vernonscope and Baader Planetarium do make higher cost filters with the best glass substrates that do not screw up the view. They cost considerably more though. Too many beginners buy a poor set of filters as an accessory to the purchase and they wind up disappointing.

 

Saturn was razor sharp. The C ring obvious as a dark line across the disc and the planet banding, more subtle than Jupiter's was good. An 85 salmon orange filter helps with bands.

 

Mars: The Mars season has begun. It is still a bit small but I started observing at 3 in the morning. Mars rides higher than the other two planets so is better placed but still an early morning object. As I started to observe fog rolled in as the top of the cell tower down the road disappeared. That is great news for planet observers. Fog is very stable air, fixed at one temperature. Water has an interesting property. When two phases, gas and liquid are simultaneously present such as fog or boiling water, the temperature is fixed. It cant go up or down. (you can make more bubbles by turning up the stove but the water gets no hotter, 100C is it). Energy saving tip! Fog is the same. Until the sun heats it, wherever it is at that is where it is. Excellent seeing. Mars showed very fine detail at considerable power, 417x. No dust storms. A clear atmosphere with good albedo features. At that magnification the disc offers a good view. It will be largest in October. This is the one planet that requires filters to see anything but very general features. I use a Televue type B Mars filter.


Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

jimcoble2000
 

sneak out Roy

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 9:02:46 AM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Planet late nights

jimcoble2000
 

No guests?

On Monday, June 22, 2020, 8:13:11 AM EDT, Kent Blackwell <kent@...> wrote:


First of all, thank goodness no one was seriously hurt in the fire and you sustained zero damage.

The only planets we saw were Jupiter and Saturn on our ride home from the campground. Bob and I got things ship/shape in our camping trailer and I tried observing later but clouds hampered. We had a big rainstorm around 5:00 pm and that made things very wet with humidity. My scope was drenched from same. Seeing was excellent though. M 5, M 57 M 12, M 10 & M 13 were unbelievable! So was Comet PANSTARRS. Wow, what a great comet! I also saw some faint galaxies but mainly stuck to show objects to share with Bob. 



6 Plus

On Jun 22, 2020, at 7:29 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Like Chuck I too was up most of the night with the planets. An exciting day with a serious fire  in one of the first floor apartments here. Came back from the store to around three ambulances and 4 fire trucks in the parking lot. Fortunately the fire was confined to the apartment which was in the same wing as mine.

The clean up crews were working until very late into the night as I was observing from my second floor balcony.

Jupiter and Saturn were in the south. Seeing was actually quite good. The second floor gets above ground effects on seeing and can provide very good views. I spent an hour on each planet, from 11 to 1 in the morning. City observing can actually have quite good seeing if not darkness. The reds spot was on the face of Jupiter with very well defined belts. I was using my 5 inch refractor on an equatorial mount. This takes up half the balcony but is quite doable. Very good detail was possible in the steady air. Spent time with Jupiter using a 3x Barlow and a combination of 16mm and 12mm Brandon orthoscopic eyepieces. I prefer old design orthos with less glass for planet work. That combination gives me about 183x with a narrow field, just fine with an equatorial mount.  I also was using a Vernonscope  56 Green filter. The green filter can enhance contrast on the planet revealing subtle details and gradations not easily seen in reflected light. It can be subtle but it is there to be seen with patience. I typically spend one hour straight on each planet. Eye drops help too as it is easy to get dry eye looking at on thing hard for that time.

I suppose there should be a warning for color filters. Most colored filters are of very limited use on planets only. Typical ones (the majority) such as Orion and other companies are produced with very poor glass blanks. That is why they are inexpensive. These ones induce optical aberrations to the point of making the view far worse than no filter at all. A couple of manufacturers, Vernonscope and Baader Planetarium do make higher cost filters with the best glass substrates that do not screw up the view. They cost considerably more though. Too many beginners buy a poor set of filters as an accessory to the purchase and they wind up disappointing.

Saturn was razor sharp. The C ring obvious as a dark line across the disc and the planet banding, more subtle than Jupiter's was good. An 85 salmon orange filter helps with bands.

Mars: The Mars season has begun. It is still a bit small but I started observing at 3 in the morning. Mars rides higher than the other two planets so is better placed but still an early morning object. As I started to observe fog rolled in as the top of the cell tower down the road disappeared. That is great news for planet observers. Fog is very stable air, fixed at one temperature. Water has an interesting property. When two phases, gas and liquid are simultaneously present such as fog or boiling water, the temperature is fixed. It cant go up or down. (you can make more bubbles by turning up the stove but the water gets no hotter, 100C is it). Energy saving tip! Fog is the same. Until the sun heats it, wherever it is at that is where it is. Excellent seeing. Mars showed very fine detail at considerable power, 417x. No dust storms. A clear atmosphere with good albedo features. At that magnification the disc offers a good view. It will be largest in October. This is the one planet that requires filters to see anything but very general features. I use a Televue type B Mars filter.


Re: Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

Roy Diffrient
 

Nice report, Chuck!  Thanks – Good eyepiece and mirror comparisons.  The flat on my 28" is also by Ostahowski – I didn't remember he also made Newt mirrors.  Talented guy – Last I looked he was also doing coatings, although not cheap and out in California.  

But pardon me, I'll wait for October planets.  That way no problem getting my eyes open and no marital strife – Dee might kill me if I tried to get her out of bed at 3 AM to look at planets.  "You want to do WHAT?"

Roy


On Jun 22, 2020, at 5:53 AM, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Planet late nights

Kent Blackwell
 

First of all, thank goodness no one was seriously hurt in the fire and you sustained zero damage.

The only planets we saw were Jupiter and Saturn on our ride home from the campground. Bob and I got things ship/shape in our camping trailer and I tried observing later but clouds hampered. We had a big rainstorm around 5:00 pm and that made things very wet with humidity. My scope was drenched from same. Seeing was excellent though. M 5, M 57 M 12, M 10 & M 13 were unbelievable! So was Comet PANSTARRS. Wow, what a great comet! I also saw some faint galaxies but mainly stuck to show objects to share with Bob. 



6 Plus

On Jun 22, 2020, at 7:29 AM, Mark Ost <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

Like Chuck I too was up most of the night with the planets. An exciting day with a serious fire  in one of the first floor apartments here. Came back from the store to around three ambulances and 4 fire trucks in the parking lot. Fortunately the fire was confined to the apartment which was in the same wing as mine.

The clean up crews were working until very late into the night as I was observing from my second floor balcony.

Jupiter and Saturn were in the south. Seeing was actually quite good. The second floor gets above ground effects on seeing and can provide very good views. I spent an hour on each planet, from 11 to 1 in the morning. City observing can actually have quite good seeing if not darkness. The reds spot was on the face of Jupiter with very well defined belts. I was using my 5 inch refractor on an equatorial mount. This takes up half the balcony but is quite doable. Very good detail was possible in the steady air. Spent time with Jupiter using a 3x Barlow and a combination of 16mm and 12mm Brandon orthoscopic eyepieces. I prefer old design orthos with less glass for planet work. That combination gives me about 183x with a narrow field, just fine with an equatorial mount.  I also was using a Vernonscope  56 Green filter. The green filter can enhance contrast on the planet revealing subtle details and gradations not easily seen in reflected light. It can be subtle but it is there to be seen with patience. I typically spend one hour straight on each planet. Eye drops help too as it is easy to get dry eye looking at on thing hard for that time.

I suppose there should be a warning for color filters. Most colored filters are of very limited use on planets only. Typical ones (the majority) such as Orion and other companies are produced with very poor glass blanks. That is why they are inexpensive. These ones induce optical aberrations to the point of making the view far worse than no filter at all. A couple of manufacturers, Vernonscope and Baader Planetarium do make higher cost filters with the best glass substrates that do not screw up the view. They cost considerably more though. Too many beginners buy a poor set of filters as an accessory to the purchase and they wind up disappointing.

Saturn was razor sharp. The C ring obvious as a dark line across the disc and the planet banding, more subtle than Jupiter's was good. An 85 salmon orange filter helps with bands.

Mars: The Mars season has begun. It is still a bit small but I started observing at 3 in the morning. Mars rides higher than the other two planets so is better placed but still an early morning object. As I started to observe fog rolled in as the top of the cell tower down the road disappeared. That is great news for planet observers. Fog is very stable air, fixed at one temperature. Water has an interesting property. When two phases, gas and liquid are simultaneously present such as fog or boiling water, the temperature is fixed. It cant go up or down. (you can make more bubbles by turning up the stove but the water gets no hotter, 100C is it). Energy saving tip! Fog is the same. Until the sun heats it, wherever it is at that is where it is. Excellent seeing. Mars showed very fine detail at considerable power, 417x. No dust storms. A clear atmosphere with good albedo features. At that magnification the disc offers a good view. It will be largest in October. This is the one planet that requires filters to see anything but very general features. I use a Televue type B Mars filter.


Planet late nights

jimcoble2000
 

Like Chuck I too was up most of the night with the planets. An exciting day with a serious fire  in one of the first floor apartments here. Came back from the store to around three ambulances and 4 fire trucks in the parking lot. Fortunately the fire was confined to the apartment which was in the same wing as mine.

The clean up crews were working until very late into the night as I was observing from my second floor balcony.

Jupiter and Saturn were in the south. Seeing was actually quite good. The second floor gets above ground effects on seeing and can provide very good views. I spent an hour on each planet, from 11 to 1 in the morning. City observing can actually have quite good seeing if not darkness. The reds spot was on the face of Jupiter with very well defined belts. I was using my 5 inch refractor on an equatorial mount. This takes up half the balcony but is quite doable. Very good detail was possible in the steady air. Spent time with Jupiter using a 3x Barlow and a combination of 16mm and 12mm Brandon orthoscopic eyepieces. I prefer old design orthos with less glass for planet work. That combination gives me about 183x with a narrow field, just fine with an equatorial mount.  I also was using a Vernonscope  56 Green filter. The green filter can enhance contrast on the planet revealing subtle details and gradations not easily seen in reflected light. It can be subtle but it is there to be seen with patience. I typically spend one hour straight on each planet. Eye drops help too as it is easy to get dry eye looking at on thing hard for that time.

I suppose there should be a warning for color filters. Most colored filters are of very limited use on planets only. Typical ones (the majority) such as Orion and other companies are produced with very poor glass blanks. That is why they are inexpensive. These ones induce optical aberrations to the point of making the view far worse than no filter at all. A couple of manufacturers, Vernonscope and Baader Planetarium do make higher cost filters with the best glass substrates that do not screw up the view. They cost considerably more though. Too many beginners buy a poor set of filters as an accessory to the purchase and they wind up disappointing.

Saturn was razor sharp. The C ring obvious as a dark line across the disc and the planet banding, more subtle than Jupiter's was good. An 85 salmon orange filter helps with bands.

Mars: The Mars season has begun. It is still a bit small but I started observing at 3 in the morning. Mars rides higher than the other two planets so is better placed but still an early morning object. As I started to observe fog rolled in as the top of the cell tower down the road disappeared. That is great news for planet observers. Fog is very stable air, fixed at one temperature. Water has an interesting property. When two phases, gas and liquid are simultaneously present such as fog or boiling water, the temperature is fixed. It cant go up or down. (you can make more bubbles by turning up the stove but the water gets no hotter, 100C is it). Energy saving tip! Fog is the same. Until the sun heats it, wherever it is at that is where it is. Excellent seeing. Mars showed very fine detail at considerable power, 417x. No dust storms. A clear atmosphere with good albedo features. At that magnification the disc offers a good view. It will be largest in October. This is the one planet that requires filters to see anything but very general features. I use a Televue type B Mars filter.


Dawn Patrol 02:50 AM to 04:29 AM 22 JUN 2020

charles jagow
 

DAWN PATROL Report – 22 JUN 2020!

 

I awoke at about quarter to 3:00 AM and found Karen (AKA What’s Her Name) playing games on her computer as she was having problems sleeping.  I went outside and could see pretty well, there were some patches of what appeared to be high thin clouds.  Out comes the 10 year old Orion XT12G re-acquired from the Wonder-Twins (Mark Gerlach’s nephews).  You never know until you know.  I bought that scope originally in 2010 and kept it until Mr. Tallman Jonesed me and acquired a 14” truss tube from Orion.  His mirror was (is still) phenomenal tiny pin point stars from center to edge WITHOUT a ParaCor, so of course I had to order one.  Mine came a few months later but not with the same quality of mirror as Jim’s, I could get pinpoint stars with my Televue Paracor.  I used this scope for years until I started having a strongrt case of aperture fever, then I went to a 20” Sky-Watcher which had a very nice mirror but crappy mechanics, returned that beast to Sky-Watcher and acquired a used Obsession 18 UC, very nice mirror in it as well. 

 

Anyway, I bought the Orion XT12G back from Mark’s Nephews about the middle of March.  It was missing the power cord and the hand controller, so I did not even know if it still worked (electronics & motors).  After a lengthy cleanup and borrowing a hand controller and power cord from Jim, the same Jim who started me on aperture fever, and found out that basically the scope still worked.  The altitude motors and goto worked like a dream, not so good on the azimuth, about 10-15 degrees slop but once on target and synched, it would track very well.  So I ordered a new hand controller and made a new power cable for it.

 

I will cut this story down a bit, I found out that this 12” Orion has the BEST mirror I have ever seen in any scope under 18”.  I hate to say it, but I feel it is  actually crisper than the fabled Tallman 14”.  It is on equal with my 18” Obsession which has a Terry Ostahowsky mirror in it.  The 18” is significantly brighter than the 12” but the contrast and crispness is very close to being the same – so the 18UC stays unassembled in the garage awaiting outreach events and my day to day scope is the Orion XT12G.

 

OK, this morning, Karen and I started looking at Jupiter with the newly acquired 14mm Pentax eyepiece from Mark of Ost.  Again, a phenomenal eyepiece, and in the XT12G it yielded 107x, introduce the Televue 2x PowerMate (barlow) and the Pentax 14 now yields a 214x amazing view of Jupiter.  Started comparing the PowerMate/Pentax against the 7mm Nagler – guess who wins hands down?  The Pentax/PowerMate combination.  Both Karen and I felt that there was significant difference between the two.  Then we swung over to Saturn.  Same test, same result.   Seeing was very good so we began swapping in/out eyepiece combinations with the PowerMate, and also a Televue ParaCor (it adds a 15% to the magnification so a 300x becomes 345x) and we ran through the following on Saturn:

 

107x     Tack Sharp.

214x     Ditto.

300x    Still tack Sharp.

500x    OMG, still tack sharp!

600x    Not quite as sharp but still can see the Casssini division.

690x    Cassini division not as crisp.

1000x   Where did the Cassini division go?

1150x   Mushy, but cool to have Saturn fill the eyepiece.

 

500x using the 3mm Radian was the highest magnification while still retaining a sharp view,  and I might add that Karen only went inside to put her hoodie on.  We then looked at Mars and Neptune, she was very impressed that Neptune was actually a crisp disc.  Triton is still hiding from me here in Greenbrier, but Neptune was very close to my offending streetlight across the street.  I have high hopes for Triton when Neptune moves away from the streetlight and gets higher in the sky.  Karen was stunned by recognizing the polar ice cap on Mars and seeing some surface detail, we once again slewed back to Saturn and finally Jupiter, by this time it was just after 04:00 AM and the seeing had dropped such that the same view we were getting at 500x was now down to 214x.  Sadly as the Cassini division became mush about a half hour later I packed it all up, Karen went back to bed and I sat here at the computer.

 

The old beat up Orion XT12G is going to start a new life soon.  I contacted Orion Tech Support about a month ago and tried to find out how to get rid of the slop in the azimuth of the base unit.  They gave me some tips and tricks, but I could only tighten it up a little bit.  I tried to talk them into just selling me the XT12 azimuth motor assembly, but the lowest assembly they would sell me was a new base unit with new motors so I ordered a new base, it was back ordered until sometime mid-July.  In the meantime I have been contemplating that decision.  The base unit on the XT12G weighs in at 53 lbs. and the OTA is nearly 50 lbs., I am concerned that my ailing 62 year old back is not going to love humping that in/out of the Subaru.  So, I cancelled my order for the new base and I have ordered an entire new Orion XX12G telescope.  I did this after assurance from Orion Tech Support (Kent’s Friend) that I could take the mirror cell from the old Orion and install it directly in the XX12G base tube.  I will also swap the Orion 2 stage focuser out with the MoonLite dual stage focuser which I put on the older Orion over ten years ago.  Doing all of this will give me new motors and adjustable clutches for goto operation, truss tubes and a collapsible base providing me a very portable scope with the heaviest piece being less than 40 lbs.  Very important for my old back.  And I will re-assemble the old XT12G with the brand new mirror and two stage focuser that came with the XX12G (maybe I will get lucky and get another really good mirror) and end up with another useable XT12G that I can perhaps sell for a significant bargain.  The new scope should be delivered the first week in August, just in time for the August BWA.

 

By then I should be able to switch from the Dawn Patrol to a late evening dance with the planets and perhaps find Triton!

 

And yes, Karen is all the while reminding me that I am supposed to be REDUCING the telescope count for next spring, who knows maybe I will end up with just the old 12” mirror in its new home, as far as Newtonians go.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

._,_._,_


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Eyepiece revamp

jimcoble2000
 

NOTHING is great at 3AM!

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 2:43:27 PM EDT, vp <vp@...> wrote:


Ted,

I always say that I never believe the forecast.  I believe my own eyes.  When I saw it was starting to rain last night, I decided not to drive an hour or so to Chippokes just to see clouds, or worse.  Of course, had I gone there at 3 a.m., it might have been great, as Chuck described.

George
On June 21, 2020 10:46 AM Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Mark, the forecast can be used to inform your plans simply by accepting that it is wrong.  Here, you have at least one variable pinned down- the forecast can be assumed to be the one possibility that just won’t happen putting you a giant step closer to your own better guess.


And, consider this:  if you check five or six weather sites, you have a slew of possibilities you can eliminate.  


Hope that helps.


Ted


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 5:42 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp


I figured it was going to be cloudy so did not try to get any planet time. The stupid weather predictions make planning next to impossible.

 

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 6:00:39 AM EDT, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

 

 

Mark who got the 7mm  I am going to try and trade my 7mm Nagler for it.

 

That 14 is OUTSTANDING.

 

I just bought a 10 XW off of Astromart at twice what you asked for.

 

A testament to that 14 is that while looking at Saturn this morning, the 14 Pentax BARLOWED was sharper than my 7mm Nagler

 

The 7mm Nagler is my current eyepiece of choice in my 12” reflector.

 

I was watching Saturn this morning with my 3mm Radian, at 500X, tack sharp – it has been months since the seeing was so good.  What a morning to hit snooze on the alarm and get up at 4:30 instead of 3:00.  I could have been enjoying these planets twice as long.  It was magical.

 

Did I mention the Pentax 14 just about blew my ass away?  I lined up on Saturn, started the tracking and went and got the XW14 put it in the scope and WHAM, what a crisp view!  SO then comes the downward eyepiece march, 12mm Nagler, 9mm Nagler, 7mm Nagler, 5mm Radian, 3mm Radian, then back to the 7 and then to the 2X Barlowed Pentax 14 – back and forth, the barlowed Pentax was clearer than the 7 Nagler.

 

I spent the rest of the morning with the 3mm Nagler watching Saturn at 500x, damn Jupiter was in the trees.  Mars was glorious as well.  You know it is good seeing when you can firmly grasp that Neptune is a disc and I think I saw Triton this morning with the 12” Dob.

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, June 19, 2020 at 4:00 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I like the Pentax but now most of my observing is with my 4 inch Televue Genesis refractor. Frankly I don't know if it is true or my imagination but the Televue eyepieces seem to work best with their scopes. Years ago I thought they were a bit dark with all that glass but the ones I have now in the Genesis have superb contrast in that scope. I plan on getting a six mm Delos. I am not crazy about the 100 degree field of the Ethos but the 70 of the Delos seems just right. A six mm fits right in with my 3.5 and 10 mm Delos. The Pentax are great in Newtonians.

 

Sometimes the high powered high pieces are hard to use in long focal length scopes but the Genesis is only 540 mm in length. The 3.5 only generates 150x. Very usable in that refractor.

 

On Friday, June 19, 2020, 10:53:09 AM EDT, RapidEye <rapideye.us@...> wrote:

 

 

Sheesh!  That price is a steal!!

They usually sell used for $200-250

I already own them, or I'd snatch them up.

They are outstanding EPs.

<RE>

 

On Fri, Jun 19, 2020 at 8:55 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Am optimizing my eyepiece collection to suit my current scope selection so some of them are for sale.

 

I have three Pentax wide field eyepieces for sale in the following sizes:

5mm

7mm

14mm

 

XW series. 1.25 barrels and 70 degree field.

 

These have been excellently maintained with no blemishes or flaws. Bolt case included. Great shape.

 

Asking 75.00 each. Normally $300.00 range for new.

 

if interested contact me here or at jimcoble 2000@...

 

Thanks guys.   Mark Ost



George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org



Re: Eyepiece revamp

jimcoble2000
 

I find the 3.5 only good for planetaries and double stars and that is with a relatively short focal length of 950mm. It is not too bad with my fast refractor (540mm fl). When things get desperate on doubles I have used a 2.5 effectively but only on doubles.

I have used the 3.5 for a few globulars but with a refractor I use a lot of tricks to resolve details such as observing with a  dark cloth over the head and wearing wrap around sunglasses (NASCARS) prior to observing (yes at night!).

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 11:42:52 AM EDT, RapidEye <rapideye.us@...> wrote:


Chuck, as much as you like that 14mm, the 10mm will blow you away even more.
The 14 has a bit of field curvature, not enough to be objectionable, but its there.
The 20 is worse, but again, not enough to be objectionable.
The 10 is almost perfect in every regard.  For me, its the perfect planetary EP.
The 5 and the 7 are almost as good as the 10, only a hair behind them in sharpness.
The only one I don't own is the 3.5mm - but with our seeing????  Nah, the odd night that good, I'll barlow the 7mm.
Enjoy!
<RE>

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 10:46 AM Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

Mark, the forecast can be used to inform your plans simply by accepting that it is wrong.  Here, you have at least one variable pinned down- the forecast can be assumed to be the one possibility that just won’t happen putting you a giant step closer to your own better guess.

 

And, consider this:  if you check five or six weather sites, you have a slew of possibilities you can eliminate.  

 

Hope that helps.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 5:42 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I figured it was going to be cloudy so did not try to get any planet time. The stupid weather predictions make planning next to impossible.

 

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 6:00:39 AM EDT, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

 

 

Mark who got the 7mm  I am going to try and trade my 7mm Nagler for it.

 

That 14 is OUTSTANDING.

 

I just bought a 10 XW off of Astromart at twice what you asked for.

 

A testament to that 14 is that while looking at Saturn this morning, the 14 Pentax BARLOWED was sharper than my 7mm Nagler

 

The 7mm Nagler is my current eyepiece of choice in my 12” reflector.

 

I was watching Saturn this morning with my 3mm Radian, at 500X, tack sharp – it has been months since the seeing was so good.  What a morning to hit snooze on the alarm and get up at 4:30 instead of 3:00.  I could have been enjoying these planets twice as long.  It was magical.

 

Did I mention the Pentax 14 just about blew my ass away?  I lined up on Saturn, started the tracking and went and got the XW14 put it in the scope and WHAM, what a crisp view!  SO then comes the downward eyepiece march, 12mm Nagler, 9mm Nagler, 7mm Nagler, 5mm Radian, 3mm Radian, then back to the 7 and then to the 2X Barlowed Pentax 14 – back and forth, the barlowed Pentax was clearer than the 7 Nagler.

 

I spent the rest of the morning with the 3mm Nagler watching Saturn at 500x, damn Jupiter was in the trees.  Mars was glorious as well.  You know it is good seeing when you can firmly grasp that Neptune is a disc and I think I saw Triton this morning with the 12” Dob.

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, June 19, 2020 at 4:00 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I like the Pentax but now most of my observing is with my 4 inch Televue Genesis refractor. Frankly I don't know if it is true or my imagination but the Televue eyepieces seem to work best with their scopes. Years ago I thought they were a bit dark with all that glass but the ones I have now in the Genesis have superb contrast in that scope. I plan on getting a six mm Delos. I am not crazy about the 100 degree field of the Ethos but the 70 of the Delos seems just right. A six mm fits right in with my 3.5 and 10 mm Delos. The Pentax are great in Newtonians.

 

Sometimes the high powered high pieces are hard to use in long focal length scopes but the Genesis is only 540 mm in length. The 3.5 only generates 150x. Very usable in that refractor.

 

On Friday, June 19, 2020, 10:53:09 AM EDT, RapidEye <rapideye.us@...> wrote:

 

 

Sheesh!  That price is a steal!!

They usually sell used for $200-250

I already own them, or I'd snatch them up.

They are outstanding EPs.

<RE>

 

On Fri, Jun 19, 2020 at 8:55 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Am optimizing my eyepiece collection to suit my current scope selection so some of them are for sale.

 

I have three Pentax wide field eyepieces for sale in the following sizes:

5mm

7mm

14mm

 

XW series. 1.25 barrels and 70 degree field.

 

These have been excellently maintained with no blemishes or flaws. Bolt case included. Great shape.

 

Asking 75.00 each. Normally $300.00 range for new.

 

if interested contact me here or at jimcoble 2000@...

 

Thanks guys.   Mark Ost


Re: Eyepiece revamp

jimcoble2000
 

Ha ha. No I fear it doesn't help too much. I love Kent's observation of half the attendees at ECSP walking around all day, looking at their smart phones, only to be in bed by 9!

I used to say that most people could not even remember what the weather was that day unless they worked outside, were sailors, or rode motorcycles. I think we can add observers to the list of those who do know. Everyone else is inside in air conditiong and watching the 6 o'clock news telling them what happened or what may happen!

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 10:46:40 AM EDT, Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Mark, the forecast can be used to inform your plans simply by accepting that it is wrong.  Here, you have at least one variable pinned down- the forecast can be assumed to be the one possibility that just won’t happen putting you a giant step closer to your own better guess.

 

And, consider this:  if you check five or six weather sites, you have a slew of possibilities you can eliminate.  

 

Hope that helps.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 5:42 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I figured it was going to be cloudy so did not try to get any planet time. The stupid weather predictions make planning next to impossible.

 

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 6:00:39 AM EDT, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

 

 

Mark who got the 7mm  I am going to try and trade my 7mm Nagler for it.

 

That 14 is OUTSTANDING.

 

I just bought a 10 XW off of Astromart at twice what you asked for.

 

A testament to that 14 is that while looking at Saturn this morning, the 14 Pentax BARLOWED was sharper than my 7mm Nagler

 

The 7mm Nagler is my current eyepiece of choice in my 12” reflector.

 

I was watching Saturn this morning with my 3mm Radian, at 500X, tack sharp – it has been months since the seeing was so good.  What a morning to hit snooze on the alarm and get up at 4:30 instead of 3:00.  I could have been enjoying these planets twice as long.  It was magical.

 

Did I mention the Pentax 14 just about blew my ass away?  I lined up on Saturn, started the tracking and went and got the XW14 put it in the scope and WHAM, what a crisp view!  SO then comes the downward eyepiece march, 12mm Nagler, 9mm Nagler, 7mm Nagler, 5mm Radian, 3mm Radian, then back to the 7 and then to the 2X Barlowed Pentax 14 – back and forth, the barlowed Pentax was clearer than the 7 Nagler.

 

I spent the rest of the morning with the 3mm Nagler watching Saturn at 500x, damn Jupiter was in the trees.  Mars was glorious as well.  You know it is good seeing when you can firmly grasp that Neptune is a disc and I think I saw Triton this morning with the 12” Dob.

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, June 19, 2020 at 4:00 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I like the Pentax but now most of my observing is with my 4 inch Televue Genesis refractor. Frankly I don't know if it is true or my imagination but the Televue eyepieces seem to work best with their scopes. Years ago I thought they were a bit dark with all that glass but the ones I have now in the Genesis have superb contrast in that scope. I plan on getting a six mm Delos. I am not crazy about the 100 degree field of the Ethos but the 70 of the Delos seems just right. A six mm fits right in with my 3.5 and 10 mm Delos. The Pentax are great in Newtonians.

 

Sometimes the high powered high pieces are hard to use in long focal length scopes but the Genesis is only 540 mm in length. The 3.5 only generates 150x. Very usable in that refractor.

 

On Friday, June 19, 2020, 10:53:09 AM EDT, RapidEye <rapideye.us@...> wrote:

 

 

Sheesh!  That price is a steal!!

They usually sell used for $200-250

I already own them, or I'd snatch them up.

They are outstanding EPs.

<RE>

 

On Fri, Jun 19, 2020 at 8:55 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Am optimizing my eyepiece collection to suit my current scope selection so some of them are for sale.

 

I have three Pentax wide field eyepieces for sale in the following sizes:

5mm

7mm

14mm

 

XW series. 1.25 barrels and 70 degree field.

 

These have been excellently maintained with no blemishes or flaws. Bolt case included. Great shape.

 

Asking 75.00 each. Normally $300.00 range for new.

 

if interested contact me here or at jimcoble 2000@...

 

Thanks guys.   Mark Ost


Re: Eyepiece revamp

vp
 

Ted,

I always say that I never believe the forecast.  I believe my own eyes.  When I saw it was starting to rain last night, I decided not to drive an hour or so to Chippokes just to see clouds, or worse.  Of course, had I gone there at 3 a.m., it might have been great, as Chuck described.

George
On June 21, 2020 10:46 AM Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:


Mark, the forecast can be used to inform your plans simply by accepting that it is wrong.  Here, you have at least one variable pinned down- the forecast can be assumed to be the one possibility that just won’t happen putting you a giant step closer to your own better guess.


And, consider this:  if you check five or six weather sites, you have a slew of possibilities you can eliminate.  


Hope that helps.


Ted


From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 5:42 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp


I figured it was going to be cloudy so did not try to get any planet time. The stupid weather predictions make planning next to impossible.

 

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 6:00:39 AM EDT, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

 

 

Mark who got the 7mm  I am going to try and trade my 7mm Nagler for it.

 

That 14 is OUTSTANDING.

 

I just bought a 10 XW off of Astromart at twice what you asked for.

 

A testament to that 14 is that while looking at Saturn this morning, the 14 Pentax BARLOWED was sharper than my 7mm Nagler

 

The 7mm Nagler is my current eyepiece of choice in my 12” reflector.

 

I was watching Saturn this morning with my 3mm Radian, at 500X, tack sharp – it has been months since the seeing was so good.  What a morning to hit snooze on the alarm and get up at 4:30 instead of 3:00.  I could have been enjoying these planets twice as long.  It was magical.

 

Did I mention the Pentax 14 just about blew my ass away?  I lined up on Saturn, started the tracking and went and got the XW14 put it in the scope and WHAM, what a crisp view!  SO then comes the downward eyepiece march, 12mm Nagler, 9mm Nagler, 7mm Nagler, 5mm Radian, 3mm Radian, then back to the 7 and then to the 2X Barlowed Pentax 14 – back and forth, the barlowed Pentax was clearer than the 7 Nagler.

 

I spent the rest of the morning with the 3mm Nagler watching Saturn at 500x, damn Jupiter was in the trees.  Mars was glorious as well.  You know it is good seeing when you can firmly grasp that Neptune is a disc and I think I saw Triton this morning with the 12” Dob.

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, June 19, 2020 at 4:00 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I like the Pentax but now most of my observing is with my 4 inch Televue Genesis refractor. Frankly I don't know if it is true or my imagination but the Televue eyepieces seem to work best with their scopes. Years ago I thought they were a bit dark with all that glass but the ones I have now in the Genesis have superb contrast in that scope. I plan on getting a six mm Delos. I am not crazy about the 100 degree field of the Ethos but the 70 of the Delos seems just right. A six mm fits right in with my 3.5 and 10 mm Delos. The Pentax are great in Newtonians.

 

Sometimes the high powered high pieces are hard to use in long focal length scopes but the Genesis is only 540 mm in length. The 3.5 only generates 150x. Very usable in that refractor.

 

On Friday, June 19, 2020, 10:53:09 AM EDT, RapidEye <rapideye.us@...> wrote:

 

 

Sheesh!  That price is a steal!!

They usually sell used for $200-250

I already own them, or I'd snatch them up.

They are outstanding EPs.

<RE>

 

On Fri, Jun 19, 2020 at 8:55 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Am optimizing my eyepiece collection to suit my current scope selection so some of them are for sale.

 

I have three Pentax wide field eyepieces for sale in the following sizes:

5mm

7mm

14mm

 

XW series. 1.25 barrels and 70 degree field.

 

These have been excellently maintained with no blemishes or flaws. Bolt case included. Great shape.

 

Asking 75.00 each. Normally $300.00 range for new.

 

if interested contact me here or at jimcoble 2000@...

 

Thanks guys.   Mark Ost



George Reynolds 
VP, Back Bay Amateur Astronomers 
BBAA 
Outreach Coordinator
backbayastro.org



Re: Eyepiece revamp

RapidEye
 

Chuck, as much as you like that 14mm, the 10mm will blow you away even more.
The 14 has a bit of field curvature, not enough to be objectionable, but its there.
The 20 is worse, but again, not enough to be objectionable.
The 10 is almost perfect in every regard.  For me, its the perfect planetary EP.
The 5 and the 7 are almost as good as the 10, only a hair behind them in sharpness.
The only one I don't own is the 3.5mm - but with our seeing????  Nah, the odd night that good, I'll barlow the 7mm.
Enjoy!
<RE>

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 10:46 AM Ted Forte <tedforte511@...> wrote:

Mark, the forecast can be used to inform your plans simply by accepting that it is wrong.  Here, you have at least one variable pinned down- the forecast can be assumed to be the one possibility that just won’t happen putting you a giant step closer to your own better guess.

 

And, consider this:  if you check five or six weather sites, you have a slew of possibilities you can eliminate.  

 

Hope that helps.

 

Ted

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of jimcoble2000 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 5:42 AM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I figured it was going to be cloudy so did not try to get any planet time. The stupid weather predictions make planning next to impossible.

 

On Sunday, June 21, 2020, 6:00:39 AM EDT, Chuck Jagow <chuck@...> wrote:

 

 

Mark who got the 7mm  I am going to try and trade my 7mm Nagler for it.

 

That 14 is OUTSTANDING.

 

I just bought a 10 XW off of Astromart at twice what you asked for.

 

A testament to that 14 is that while looking at Saturn this morning, the 14 Pentax BARLOWED was sharper than my 7mm Nagler

 

The 7mm Nagler is my current eyepiece of choice in my 12” reflector.

 

I was watching Saturn this morning with my 3mm Radian, at 500X, tack sharp – it has been months since the seeing was so good.  What a morning to hit snooze on the alarm and get up at 4:30 instead of 3:00.  I could have been enjoying these planets twice as long.  It was magical.

 

Did I mention the Pentax 14 just about blew my ass away?  I lined up on Saturn, started the tracking and went and got the XW14 put it in the scope and WHAM, what a crisp view!  SO then comes the downward eyepiece march, 12mm Nagler, 9mm Nagler, 7mm Nagler, 5mm Radian, 3mm Radian, then back to the 7 and then to the 2X Barlowed Pentax 14 – back and forth, the barlowed Pentax was clearer than the 7 Nagler.

 

I spent the rest of the morning with the 3mm Nagler watching Saturn at 500x, damn Jupiter was in the trees.  Mars was glorious as well.  You know it is good seeing when you can firmly grasp that Neptune is a disc and I think I saw Triton this morning with the 12” Dob.

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of "jimcoble2000 via groups.io" <jimcoble2000@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, June 19, 2020 at 4:00 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BackBayAstro] Eyepiece revamp

 

I like the Pentax but now most of my observing is with my 4 inch Televue Genesis refractor. Frankly I don't know if it is true or my imagination but the Televue eyepieces seem to work best with their scopes. Years ago I thought they were a bit dark with all that glass but the ones I have now in the Genesis have superb contrast in that scope. I plan on getting a six mm Delos. I am not crazy about the 100 degree field of the Ethos but the 70 of the Delos seems just right. A six mm fits right in with my 3.5 and 10 mm Delos. The Pentax are great in Newtonians.

 

Sometimes the high powered high pieces are hard to use in long focal length scopes but the Genesis is only 540 mm in length. The 3.5 only generates 150x. Very usable in that refractor.

 

On Friday, June 19, 2020, 10:53:09 AM EDT, RapidEye <rapideye.us@...> wrote:

 

 

Sheesh!  That price is a steal!!

They usually sell used for $200-250

I already own them, or I'd snatch them up.

They are outstanding EPs.

<RE>

 

On Fri, Jun 19, 2020 at 8:55 AM jimcoble2000 via groups.io <jimcoble2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Am optimizing my eyepiece collection to suit my current scope selection so some of them are for sale.

 

I have three Pentax wide field eyepieces for sale in the following sizes:

5mm

7mm

14mm

 

XW series. 1.25 barrels and 70 degree field.

 

These have been excellently maintained with no blemishes or flaws. Bolt case included. Great shape.

 

Asking 75.00 each. Normally $300.00 range for new.

 

if interested contact me here or at jimcoble 2000@...

 

Thanks guys.   Mark Ost

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