Date   

Re: Latest Image IC 410 aka The Tadpoles

charles jagow
 

SPOOKY looking, nice shot!

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: <BackBayAstro@groups.io> on behalf of Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...>
Reply-To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Date: Friday, April 3, 2020 at 4:08 PM
To: <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Latest Image IC 410 aka The Tadpoles

 

Got a few minutes out last night and spent some time with The Tadpoles. Only able to salvage a few Ha frames due to Moon, passing clouds and an occasional gust of wind. Not enough SII and OIII frames made the cut to be worth while...Maybe another night! Just excited to see some stars again since about the first of March.

Stu


--

v/r

Chuck Jagow

Treasurer - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

Rott'n Paws Observatory

    N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

 


Re: Latest Image IC 410 aka The Tadpoles

Ian Stewart
 

Hey Stu good shot. I'm struggling to find Ha targets with the moon. It always seems to happen - moon up clear skies, moon down - clouds.

Cheers

Ian

On 4/3/2020 4:08 PM, Stu Beaber wrote:
Got a few minutes out last night and spent some time with The Tadpoles. Only able to salvage a few Ha frames due to Moon, passing clouds and an occasional gust of wind. Not enough SII and OIII frames made the cut to be worth while...Maybe another night! Just excited to see some stars again since about the first of March.

Stu


Latest Image IC 410 aka The Tadpoles

Stu Beaber
 

Got a few minutes out last night and spent some time with The Tadpoles. Only able to salvage a few Ha frames due to Moon, passing clouds and an occasional gust of wind. Not enough SII and OIII frames made the cut to be worth while...Maybe another night! Just excited to see some stars again since about the first of March.

Stu


Re: Sun Activity

jimcoble2000
 

Been watching it for the last two days. Best in a long time. Other highlights: Venus Pleiades conjunction tonight and tomorrow. Three planets in the early morning in the southeast. I was up at 430 to catch those yesterday morning. Look at Venus tonight at twilight in a wide field.

On Thursday, April 2, 2020, 3:55:04 PM EDT, Jim Tallman via groups.io <jctallman2006@...> wrote:


If you have Ha capability, have a look at the sun. Very large prominence is evident!

Best I've seen all year!

Jim

Sent from my stupid phone


Sun Activity

Jim Tallman
 

If you have Ha capability, have a look at the sun. Very large prominence is evident!

Best I've seen all year!

Jim

Sent from my stupid phone


BBAA Meeting April 2020 Cancelled #poll

Shawn Loescher
 

The BBAA meeting for tonight has been cancelled due to COVID19 virus. Since it appears the cancelling of events will be the norm for awhile we are looking at holding a online version of the club meeting if there is enough interest. Please indicate your interest in that below. Thanks.

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Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Roy Diffrient
 

I looked up the astronomer, Yuri Beletsky.  He's with the ESO in Chile at Carnegie Los Campanas observatory in the Atacama.  The images were taken with a relatively small telescope, then a year to process.  More info here:



On Mar 30, 2020, at 7:56 AM, Stu Beaber <wd4sel@...> wrote:

Yeah Bob...I think it did say that it was multi years and it was 1400 images put togather in a mosaic. I think I figured it out correctly the other day and if my math is correct it comes out to about 10 minutes an image, (using rough figures about 9.8 minutes). That is about what a lot of images use for such bright areas of the sky. Also using ordinary software that could all be automated by programing so you could sleep thru the whole thing. Processing, on the other hand, would be a bear of a job. The same software would assemble the mosaic with the correct overlap and correct background colors.

Stu



On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:15 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Stu Beaber
 

Corrected message....line 2

"That is about what a lot of IMAGERS use" vice "That is about what a lot of IMAGES use"

Stu


On Mon, Mar 30, 2020 at 7:56 AM Stu Beaber via Groups.Io <wd4sel=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yeah Bob...I think it did say that it was multi years and it was 1400 images put togather in a mosaic. I think I figured it out correctly the other day and if my math is correct it comes out to about 10 minutes an image, (using rough figures about 9.8 minutes). That is about what a lot of images use for such bright areas of the sky. Also using ordinary software that could all be automated by programing so you could sleep thru the whole thing. Processing, on the other hand, would be a bear of a job. The same software would assemble the mosaic with the correct overlap and correct background colors.

Stu



On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:15 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Stu Beaber
 

Yeah Bob...I think it did say that it was multi years and it was 1400 images put togather in a mosaic. I think I figured it out correctly the other day and if my math is correct it comes out to about 10 minutes an image, (using rough figures about 9.8 minutes). That is about what a lot of images use for such bright areas of the sky. Also using ordinary software that could all be automated by programing so you could sleep thru the whole thing. Processing, on the other hand, would be a bear of a job. The same software would assemble the mosaic with the correct overlap and correct background colors.

Stu



On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 11:15 PM bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

jimcoble2000
 

Galileo started the image back in 1637. He became an imager after he went blind.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 11:15:45 PM EDT, bob414 <bob414@...> wrote:


Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

bob414
 

Very interesting!  I wonder where they were to get 212 hours of cloud free night viewing.  I do not think I seen that much time clear this year.  Maybe it was a multi-year image?

 

Bob

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roy Diffrient
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 4:17 PM
To: BBAA Groups Io <BackBayAstro@groups.io>
Subject: [BackBayAstro] APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.

 

 

Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Ian Stewart
 

OMG!!!

On 3/29/2020 4:16 PM, Roy Diffrient wrote:
Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Jim Tallman
 

:) Word

Sent from my stupid phone




On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 6:07 PM -0400, "jimcoble2000 via Groups.Io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

What a great overview. Often observing with a telescope you cannot get an overall big picture setting.

Oddly I have found that 20x80 binoculars in a dark sky reveal much that is hidden by using a telescope. The margin of Barnard's Loop is dead obvious in binoculars. Totally hidden in a telescope.  There is an open cluster that is perfect for seeing the boundary of the large loop. Using this as a guide in a small telescope sets the context.

Seeing M-78 in a telescope is interesting but seeing it in a wide field view is revelatory. Without an understanding of the background, the details are always incomplete and deceptive.

It is trend, understandable, for larger and larger telescopes with narrow fields to be used as primary observation tool. They do reveal details and faint objects that only a large aperture can do but they loose context due to design. Try looking at the entire Veil Nebula in a three inch telescope under a dark sky with a wide eyepiece. It puts it all in context.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 4:17:00 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Jim Tallman
 

Very cool!

Jim

Sent from my stupid phone




On Sun, Mar 29, 2020 at 4:43 PM -0400, "Roy Diffrient" <mail@...> wrote:

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Re: APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

jimcoble2000
 

What a great overview. Often observing with a telescope you cannot get an overall big picture setting.

Oddly I have found that 20x80 binoculars in a dark sky reveal much that is hidden by using a telescope. The margin of Barnard's Loop is dead obvious in binoculars. Totally hidden in a telescope.  There is an open cluster that is perfect for seeing the boundary of the large loop. Using this as a guide in a small telescope sets the context.

Seeing M-78 in a telescope is interesting but seeing it in a wide field view is revelatory. Without an understanding of the background, the details are always incomplete and deceptive.

It is trend, understandable, for larger and larger telescopes with narrow fields to be used as primary observation tool. They do reveal details and faint objects that only a large aperture can do but they loose context due to design. Try looking at the entire Veil Nebula in a three inch telescope under a dark sky with a wide eyepiece. It puts it all in context.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 4:17:00 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


APOD 3/29/2020, Going Deep on Orion

Roy Diffrient
 

Wow, how about a 212 hour exposure of Orion?!!  Deepest I've seen.


Roy


Re: Moon, Venus, Pleiades tonight

jimcoble2000
 

sweet

On Saturday, March 28, 2020, 3:19:40 PM EDT, Roy Diffrient <mail@...> wrote:


For those with clear skies, check out the conjunction in the west tonight.

Roy




Moon, Venus, Pleiades tonight

Roy Diffrient
 

For those with clear skies, check out the conjunction in the west tonight.

Roy


Re: Clouds and more clouds

Jim Tallman
 

Glad I could help :)

Sent from my stupid phone



On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 2:37 PM -0400, "jimcoble2000 via Groups.Io" <jimcoble2000@...> wrote:

you give me reason to live another day

On Saturday, March 21, 2020, 2:01:39 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


:)

 

yeah, it was to rainy today to work in the yard also, so I made a small focusing mask for the 60mm and reinstalled my repaired G-11 motor back into the mount. The motor was just fine but the optical encoder some how came loose in the housing and it tapped the encoder disc. The mount had been having problem lately tracking and such, and then it finally gave up trying to slew, I could guide, but any fast movement froze the motor.

 

Luckily Scott Losmandy had me send it in for his shop to test it, and only charged be $40 and shopping for the repair, vice having to buy a new motor at $225 a pop.  I like that deal. :)

 

Never fear though the clouds will go away, as the moon is full again :)

 

Jim   

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Kent Blackwell
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 1:45 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Clouds and more clouds

 

It's wise to say home in the current situation, but it would be nice if we could stargaze if even solo. Although we've experienced some beautiful days it seems clouds roll in every night. We had a brief partial clearing Friday night so I rolled out my 16" f/6 telescope out of the garage,  in my very light polluted yard to see if 8th magnitude Comet C/2019 Y4 ATLAS could be seen. Well, I did see it but am here to tell you it is FAINT. Not only was I fighting light pollution but also thick haze, so the prospect might be good in coming weeks when skies clear, plus the comet is brightening as well.

Keep gazing at the skies, it'll keep us occupied and prevent us from going stir crazy. I've been photographing birds, landscapes and bike riding to occupy may time, not to mention yard work! Oh my, has it come to that?


Re: Clouds and more clouds

jimcoble2000
 

you give me reason to live another day

On Saturday, March 21, 2020, 2:01:39 PM EDT, Jim Tallman <jctallman@...> wrote:


:)

 

yeah, it was to rainy today to work in the yard also, so I made a small focusing mask for the 60mm and reinstalled my repaired G-11 motor back into the mount. The motor was just fine but the optical encoder some how came loose in the housing and it tapped the encoder disc. The mount had been having problem lately tracking and such, and then it finally gave up trying to slew, I could guide, but any fast movement froze the motor.

 

Luckily Scott Losmandy had me send it in for his shop to test it, and only charged be $40 and shopping for the repair, vice having to buy a new motor at $225 a pop.  I like that deal. :)

 

Never fear though the clouds will go away, as the moon is full again :)

 

Jim   

 

From: BackBayAstro@groups.io <BackBayAstro@groups.io> On Behalf Of Kent Blackwell
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 1:45 PM
To: BackBayAstro@groups.io
Subject: [BackBayAstro] Clouds and more clouds

 

It's wise to say home in the current situation, but it would be nice if we could stargaze if even solo. Although we've experienced some beautiful days it seems clouds roll in every night. We had a brief partial clearing Friday night so I rolled out my 16" f/6 telescope out of the garage,  in my very light polluted yard to see if 8th magnitude Comet C/2019 Y4 ATLAS could be seen. Well, I did see it but am here to tell you it is FAINT. Not only was I fighting light pollution but also thick haze, so the prospect might be good in coming weeks when skies clear, plus the comet is brightening as well.

Keep gazing at the skies, it'll keep us occupied and prevent us from going stir crazy. I've been photographing birds, landscapes and bike riding to occupy may time, not to mention yard work! Oh my, has it come to that?

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