Date   

Re: SH2 171

charles jagow
 

Nice Image.

 

Member #1495 – Norfolk County Rifle Range

 

From: BBAA on behalf of BBAA
Reply-To: BBAA
Date: Saturday, September 9, 2017 at 3:53 PM
To: BBAA
Subject: [backbayastro] SH2 171

 

 

Wow three nights in a row. Here's SH2 171 a very interesting emission nebula in Cepheus. Needs more time but I'm definitely going to explore this one a bit more.

Cheers

Ian

http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h95830087#h95830087

 


Re: SH2 171

jimcoble2000
 

Livin the dream


On Saturday, September 9, 2017, 3:53:36 PM EDT, ian@... [backbayastro] wrote:


 

Wow three nights in a row. Here's SH2 171 a very interesting emission nebula in Cepheus. Needs more time but I'm definitely going to explore this one a bit more.

Cheers

Ian

http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h95830087#h95830087



SH2 171

uwicb
 

Wow three nights in a row. Here's SH2 171 a very interesting emission nebula in Cepheus. Needs more time but I'm definitely going to explore this one a bit more.

Cheers

Ian

http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h95830087#h95830087



The sun today and Asteroid Florence

Kent Blackwell
 

There is some solar activity in H-alpha today, but not too much. Look fast in white light scopes at those large sunspots because they're drifting to the limb

Asteroid Florence is dimming and moving slower across the sky so if you want to see it you'd best try tonight as it'll be high in the sky in Cygnus. I saw it last night. As with last night it's near NGC 6826, The Blinking Planetary so that's a fun stepping stone to locating it.

Kent Blackwell


Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

galacticprobe
 

Ah... Unfortunately that doesn't leave us much to work with. I mean, with no other stars visible in the eclipse images (these, or any I've seen so far) other than Regulus as the "Target Star", how do we get measurements for the deflection calculations if there are no "Reference Stars"?

Dino.

-----Original Message-----
From: 'bob414' bob414@... [backbayastro]
To: backbayastro
Sent: Fri, Sep 8, 2017 4:05 pm
Subject: RE: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

 
Both pictures from AL appear to have  Regulus as the only star I see, just the picture is turned 90 Degrees.
Bob
From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...]
Sent: Friday, September 8, 2017 2:04 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet
Yeah, I had to look twice at the AL page before I noticed that link to the images. Maybe it's my stanky old wizzard(sic) eyes, but I can only see one object in each image. That first image has what looks like a planet above the eclipse, and the second image also has what looks like a planet (or a really faint star) to the left of the eclipse. Everything else is overpowered by that corona.
I hope more images show up somewhere that have more stars visible so we have a better reference. (Then maybe I'll know what I'm looking at in the two images from above, and have some reference stars for the deflection calculations.)
And many thanks to Jeff for that spreadsheet!
Dino.
-----Original Message-----
From: vpas@... [backbayastro] <backbayastro@...>
To: backbayastro <backbayastro@...>
Sent: Fri, Sep 8, 2017 1:40 pm
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet
Hey Jeff,
Thanks. In the writeup they offer this link for images:
It took some scanning to actually find them again. It was in the beginning of the website, and not under the Resources and Links section.
Thanks everyone for sharing your Eclipse attempts and successes. I have laughed that hard for some time after hearing Kenny's story. Puts things into perspective doesn't it? Bob, thanks for driving and the company.
Clear Bright Skies,
Bird


Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

bob414
 

Both pictures from AL appear to have  Regulus as the only star I see, just the picture is turned 90 Degrees.

 

 

Bob

 

From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...]
Sent: Friday, September 8, 2017 2:04 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

 

 

Yeah, I had to look twice at the AL page before I noticed that link to the images. Maybe it's my stanky old wizzard(sic) eyes, but I can only see one object in each image. That first image has what looks like a planet above the eclipse, and the second image also has what looks like a planet (or a really faint star) to the left of the eclipse. Everything else is overpowered by that corona.

 

I hope more images show up somewhere that have more stars visible so we have a better reference. (Then maybe I'll know what I'm looking at in the two images from above, and have some reference stars for the deflection calculations.)

 

And many thanks to Jeff for that spreadsheet!

 

Dino.

-----Original Message-----
From: vpas@... [backbayastro] <backbayastro@...>
To: backbayastro <backbayastro@...>
Sent: Fri, Sep 8, 2017 1:40 pm
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

 

Hey Jeff,

 

Thanks. In the writeup they offer this link for images:

 

It took some scanning to actually find them again. It was in the beginning of the website, and not under the Resources and Links section.

 

Thanks everyone for sharing your Eclipse attempts and successes. I have laughed that hard for some time after hearing Kenny's story. Puts things into perspective doesn't it? Bob, thanks for driving and the company.

 

Clear Bright Skies,

Bird

 


Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

galacticprobe
 

Yeah, I had to look twice at the AL page before I noticed that link to the images. Maybe it's my stanky old wizzard(sic) eyes, but I can only see one object in each image. That first image has what looks like a planet above the eclipse, and the second image also has what looks like a planet (or a really faint star) to the left of the eclipse. Everything else is overpowered by that corona.

I hope more images show up somewhere that have more stars visible so we have a better reference. (Then maybe I'll know what I'm looking at in the two images from above, and have some reference stars for the deflection calculations.)

And many thanks to Jeff for that spreadsheet!

Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: vpas@... [backbayastro]
To: backbayastro
Sent: Fri, Sep 8, 2017 1:40 pm
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

 
Hey Jeff,

Thanks. In the writeup they offer this link for images:

It took some scanning to actually find them again. It was in the beginning of the website, and not under the Resources and Links section.

Thanks everyone for sharing your Eclipse attempts and successes. I have laughed that hard for some time after hearing Kenny's story. Puts things into perspective doesn't it? Bob, thanks for driving and the company.

Clear Bright Skies,
Bird


Re: 2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

Lawrence Taylor
 

Hey Jeff,

Thanks. In the writeup they offer this link for images:

It took some scanning to actually find them again. It was in the beginning of the website, and not under the Resources and Links section.

Thanks everyone for sharing your Eclipse attempts and successes. I have laughed that hard for some time after hearing Kenny's story. Puts things into perspective doesn't it? Bob, thanks for driving and the company.

Clear Bright Skies,
Bird


Ghost of Cassiopeia

uwicb
 

Another nice night last night. Still a near full moon so more narrowband imaging. One of my favorite targets in Cassiopeia is SH2 185 often referred to as the Ghost of Cassiopeia. Here's a few hours worth of Ha.


Cheers


Ian


http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h956d6cdf#h956d6cdf



2017 Solar Eclipse Award Spreadsheet

Jeff Goldstein
 

To all BBAA Club members:

 

I have prepared a spreadsheet to share only among BBAA club members that are attempting to earn the Astronomical League’s award.

Please give me feedback before I submit.  I’m sharing this information in hopes that other members in the club will try for the Level 3 award.

 

I’m attaching my Excel 97-2003 Spreadsheet for compatibility to other platforms.  See the bottom of this email to download it.

 

Here’s the website with the details for the award:

https://www.astroleague.org/content/solar-eclipse-2017-special-observing-award

 

Sincerely,

 

Jeff Goldstein

BBAA Secretary

 

 


Massive X-Class Solar Flare from Sunspot AR2673

galacticprobe
 

This is from Space Weather.com:

"X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE: On Sept. 6, 2017, at 12:02UT, active sunspot AR2673 unleashed an X9.3-class solar flare--the strongest solar flare in more than a decade. The explosion also hurled a CME into space, and possibly toward Earth. Analysis of the event is still underway. Visit Spaceweather.com for updates and more information about the historical context of today's remarkable flare."

X-Class - X9 (and then some) no less! It's a big one. This could cause all sorts of havoc if it hits the planet. (There is no upper limit to X-Class flares, so where your A-Class would cross from A9.9 to a B-Class after that, your X-Class can go as high as needed, even as high as X42 or more... which would pretty much kill every electrical grid on the planet of that sort of CME hit us head on.)

Dino.


4k eclipse video.

vabeachdave
 

https://vimeo.com/231484786


On Sep 6, 2017 4:37 PM, "'Roy Diffrient' mail@... [backbayastro]" <backbayastro@...> wrote:
 

After reading Chuck’s saga, I thought I might provide some alternative thoughts and maybe a happier tale.
 
Our first decision for the eclipse was to make the trip a vacation with several worthwhile destinations.  This so that if the eclipse was clouded out, the entire trip would not be a total bust.  So we planned to be in Tennessee for the eclipse, with subsequent visits to Nashville, Huntsville AL, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mountains, amounting to a full week, and all within a radius of about 150 miles there.  It’s generally pretty rural there of course, so I hoped that would help avoid massive crowds.  The Wife Acceptance Factor was also high, since we would be seeing and doing lots of stuff she was interested in and had never done before.
 
I made our first hotel reservation for the path of totality on July 9, 2017.  That’s barely 6 weeks prior to the event.  To do that so late, I reasoned that we did not need to be there for the weekend, which was, of course, pretty much sold-out everywhere in totality-land by then.  So I made our eclipse-location hotel reservation for only the night of the eclipse, Monday 8/21.
 
Obviously, this would not be good for those who wanted a weekend eclipse party, or who needed a lot of setup time and on-site location planning.  But we were traveling light and alone.  This was our first total solar eclipse, and we just wanted the experience.  Our eclipse equipment consisted of two lawn chairs, cardboard eclipse glasses, one $29 pair of eclipse binos, and a kitchen colander.  My few photos were taken hand-held with my super-zoom point-n-shoot – just a nice memento.
 
We met some friendly amateur astronomers at a grassy patch of land between three hotels, and had a memorable, amazing, cloud-free eclipse.  I had scouted out this location using Google Maps, and it turned out well.  But I was prepared to relocate if necessary – lots of open land in small-town Cookeville TN.  So we sat in the shade of some small trees while the eclipse progressed, with the hotel lobby (and bathroom) less than 100 yards away.
 
We made the trip down to Knoxville TN via I 81 on Sunday 8/20/17.  I was a little concerned about this initial trip, but it turned out fairly well – back-ups for accidents delayed us an extra hour, so 9 hours instead of 8.  Knoxville was slightly out of totality, so reservations there were easily available for that Sunday.  The relatively short drive from Knoxville to Cookeville TN on Monday morning, eclipse day, was also easy.  As soon as we got away from Knoxville the traffic was light.
 
And of course, after the eclipse, plenty of hotel rooms were available, and there was light traffic for our trip to Nashville on Tuesday 8/22.  I had one reservation cancelled – one hotel near Nashville apparently closed for some reason, but they notified me in time to make another reservation, as they should have.
 
In short, it all worked out great and we’re very glad we did it.  By a little alternative thinking and planning to be somewhere other than the worst choke points, we seem to have avoided some frustrations.  Of course, the good weather we had was pure luck.  But in 2024, assuming we’re still able, I will try to start serious planning more than 6 weeks ahead.
 
Roy
 
 


Eclipse Planning

Roy Diffrient
 

After reading Chuck’s saga, I thought I might provide some alternative thoughts and maybe a happier tale.
 
Our first decision for the eclipse was to make the trip a vacation with several worthwhile destinations.  This so that if the eclipse was clouded out, the entire trip would not be a total bust.  So we planned to be in Tennessee for the eclipse, with subsequent visits to Nashville, Huntsville AL, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mountains, amounting to a full week, and all within a radius of about 150 miles there.  It’s generally pretty rural there of course, so I hoped that would help avoid massive crowds.  The Wife Acceptance Factor was also high, since we would be seeing and doing lots of stuff she was interested in and had never done before.
 
I made our first hotel reservation for the path of totality on July 9, 2017.  That’s barely 6 weeks prior to the event.  To do that so late, I reasoned that we did not need to be there for the weekend, which was, of course, pretty much sold-out everywhere in totality-land by then.  So I made our eclipse-location hotel reservation for only the night of the eclipse, Monday 8/21.
 
Obviously, this would not be good for those who wanted a weekend eclipse party, or who needed a lot of setup time and on-site location planning.  But we were traveling light and alone.  This was our first total solar eclipse, and we just wanted the experience.  Our eclipse equipment consisted of two lawn chairs, cardboard eclipse glasses, one $29 pair of eclipse binos, and a kitchen colander.  My few photos were taken hand-held with my super-zoom point-n-shoot – just a nice memento.
 
We met some friendly amateur astronomers at a grassy patch of land between three hotels, and had a memorable, amazing, cloud-free eclipse.  I had scouted out this location using Google Maps, and it turned out well.  But I was prepared to relocate if necessary – lots of open land in small-town Cookeville TN.  So we sat in the shade of some small trees while the eclipse progressed, with the hotel lobby (and bathroom) less than 100 yards away.
 
We made the trip down to Knoxville TN via I 81 on Sunday 8/20/17.  I was a little concerned about this initial trip, but it turned out fairly well – back-ups for accidents delayed us an extra hour, so 9 hours instead of 8.  Knoxville was slightly out of totality, so reservations there were easily available for that Sunday.  The relatively short drive from Knoxville to Cookeville TN on Monday morning, eclipse day, was also easy.  As soon as we got away from Knoxville the traffic was light.
 
And of course, after the eclipse, plenty of hotel rooms were available, and there was light traffic for our trip to Nashville on Tuesday 8/22.  I had one reservation cancelled – one hotel near Nashville apparently closed for some reason, but they notified me in time to make another reservation, as they should have.
 
In short, it all worked out great and we’re very glad we did it.  By a little alternative thinking and planning to be somewhere other than the worst choke points, we seem to have avoided some frustrations.  Of course, the good weather we had was pure luck.  But in 2024, assuming we’re still able, I will try to start serious planning more than 6 weeks ahead.
 
Roy
 
 


Re: Eclipse disappointments

preciousmyprecious
 

Very good thinking, Mark.
 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean

sent from my plain old laptop



From: "Mark Ost jimcoble2000@... [backbayastro]"
To: "kent@... [backbayastro]"
Sent: Tuesday, September 5, 2017 4:13 PM
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Eclipse disappointments

 
If you add the ages of Chuck and Jim then you get more than 92.


On Tuesday, September 5, 2017, 12:54:42 PM EDT, kent@... [backbayastro] wrote:


 
Reading about Chuck, Jim and others being clouded out, how about this? An eclipse chasers friend of ours got rained out. She travelled hundreds of miles to see it, by herself. Molly is 92!



Re: Eclipse disappointments

Jim Tallman
 

Yeah!!!! What Mark said!!!!

-------- Original message --------
From: "Mark Ost jimcoble2000@... [backbayastro]" <backbayastro@...>
Date: 9/5/17 4:13 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "kent@... [backbayastro]" <backbayastro@...>
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Eclipse disappointments

 

If you add the ages of Chuck and Jim then you get more than 92.


On Tuesday, September 5, 2017, 12:54:42 PM EDT, kent@... [backbayastro] <backbayastro@...> wrote:


 

Reading about Chuck, Jim and others being clouded out, how about this? An eclipse chasers friend of ours got rained out. She travelled hundreds of miles to see it, by herself. Molly is 92!


Re: Eclipse disappointments

jimcoble2000
 

If you add the ages of Chuck and Jim then you get more than 92.


On Tuesday, September 5, 2017, 12:54:42 PM EDT, kent@... [backbayastro] wrote:


 

Reading about Chuck, Jim and others being clouded out, how about this? An eclipse chasers friend of ours got rained out. She travelled hundreds of miles to see it, by herself. Molly is 92!


Eclipse disappointments

Kent Blackwell
 

Reading about Chuck, Jim and others being clouded out, how about this? An eclipse chasers friend of ours got rained out. She travelled hundreds of miles to see it, by herself. Molly is 92!


Re: 2017 Eclipse Trip

Ted Forte
 

Captivating report Chuck, sorry the clouds interfered. Not to pour salt in the wound but overall I think the country was pretty lucky.  Of the many, many reports I’ve seen from the path of totality, you guys and a bunch of people on the SIU campus in Carbondale were the only people clouded out during totality (other parts of Carbondale were clear).   I’m sure there were others patches of clouds but no one I know was under them.  We had some cloud in Casper, but in the vicinity of the sun they were high and thin and they  hardly mattered at all.   We had people reporting from Oregon, Idaho, Nebraska and all across Wyoming and they all got a good view.    2024 in Texas? (Assuming it’s dried out by then).

 

Ted

 

From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...]
Sent: Monday, September 4, 2017 5:35 PM
To: BBAA
Subject: [backbayastro] 2017 Eclipse Trip

 

 


NGC7635

uwicb
 

Almost a full moon so I picked an easy Ha target - the Bubble Nebula for last night. Beautiful evening, nice temps and no bugs. Spent some time on the moon with my dob while I imaged the Bubble. I'm surprised now much contrast I got on the nebula given I could probably read a newspaper without another light. Looking forward to earlier evenings and cooler nights.
Cheers
Ian

http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h95180eaa#h95180eaa



Re: 2017 Eclipse Trip

charles jagow
 

Thanks Ian.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
President - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory | N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512
Member - Norfolk County Rifle Range #1495

-----Original Message-----
From: ian@stewarteventimages.com [backbayastro] [mailto:backbayastro@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, September 5, 2017 08:47 AM
To: backbayastro@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: 2017 Eclipse Trip

Hey Chuck, thanks for sharing your eclipse story. Clouds or not you'll have some great stories coming out of that trip for a long time.
Cheers
Ian

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