Date   

Re: [vpas] YRSP 01/28/2017 Report

preciousmyprecious
 

Haha well put Tom. Best I've ever seen it.
 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean

sent from my plain old laptop



From: "astrochesspilot@... [vpas]"
To: vpas@...
Sent: Sunday, January 29, 2017 10:44 AM
Subject: [vpas] YRSP 01/28/2017 Report

 
What a wonderful night and great way to start off a new year at York River State Park.  It was very clear and chilly, but it didn't feel as cold as forecasted.  Most of us still had another layer of clothing to put on yet. 

I arrived about 5pm, checked out the field and met up with the staff.  The normal observation grounds were in good enough shape to use, so I started setting up there.  The maintenance man cut off the yard light, but as we found out later, accidentally locked us out of both bathrooms.  Right about sunset, Bill M. and shortly after Bob B. showed up.  Lots of catching up and setting up ensued.  Then Gerry and Piper arrived followed by Emily and Tom W., and Noel and Chase rounded out the bunch.  In total 9 members of VPAS shared the joy of astronomy for the night. 

We were all absorbing photons of every flavor for awhile, saw the ISS pass once (missed the second one) and caught an extremely bright iridium flare.  Bob stayed busy demoing the night vision equipment, cool tech.  Around about 6:45pm, we started getting guest arriving, and boy did the come.  For a cold January night with no park hiking event scheduled, we had about 30+ folks show up.  Between the 4 scopes setup, we showed them view of all the best objects in the sky, but I think they hung around Bob more.  Lots of families were there with quite a few children.  The steady group subsided around 9:45pm.  Those of us who had not left earlier or fallen asleep, (yeah, you know who you are), began packing up.  We were all gone by 22:45pm.  As I was walking back to the truck after locking the gate, another car was coming down the road.  Even at 11pm, folks still want to view the sky on a cold night.

Thank you so much, York River State Park and staff!  Once again you have offered us a wonder place to share the joy of astronomy with ourselves and the public.  Hopefully this terrific start will continual all year.




Starless M42 - almost

uwicb
 

A nice night last night. Continuing along with the starless theme here is M42 in Ha. I did leave the trap in.


Cheers


Ian

Emission Nebula | M42 Orion Nebula



Re: Chippokes

preciousmyprecious
 

I went to York River. We had quite a crowd.
 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean

sent from my plain old laptop



From: "'Chris' photos@... [backbayastro]"
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2017 3:00 PM
Subject: [backbayastro] Chippokes

 
Is anyone planning on Chippokes tonight? Forecast looks good so we're planning on going (at least for a bit).

Chris



Re: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

jimcoble2000
 

Another favorite for Halloween is NGC 7160 in Cepheus. Right time of year too. There is a certain amount of whimsy in amateur astronomy which is why professional astronomy is such a drag, lacking it to a large extent!

As the book said, "professional astronomy is a great way to screw up a nice hobby".



From: "'Roy Diffrient' mail@... [backbayastro]"
To: Mark Ost ; Kent Blackwell ; Ted Forte
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2017 2:37 PM
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

 
Fun & games for small scopes.  I remember seeing 1907 and 2129 long ago along with M35, 36, 37, 38 but haven’t seen them lately.  With the ghostly apparition and “eyes” 2129 would be fun for Halloween – too bad it’s not higher in the sky then, but it might still be doable.
 
Roy
 
 
From: Mark Ost
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2017 1:21 PM
Subject: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes
 
I have always liked to observe small sometimes dim open clusters especially if they have a bright star involved in the cluster. These are ideal visual challenges for small telescope users. My choice of telescope is my long discontinued Televue 4 inch Genesis refractor. Last night gave me a chance to observe some of these clusters so I thought I might pass along a few that were notable:
 
NGC 1857 in the center of Auriga is a fun test of averted vision. The 7.4 magnitude bright star at the center of the cluster draws your eye to it, hiding the mist of the cluster when directly observed. Moving your eye away for the star using averted vision reveals the mist of dim stars surrounding the bright star. Larger scopes may lessen the fun of seeing the cluster so this is a good small scope object to hone your averted vision techniques
 
An easier cluster, NGC 2129, in Gemini, offers a widely spaced double star as the center for the hidden cluster. This has a striking effect. The wide double is evenly matched and resembles a pair of ghost eyes staring at you from a deep apparition. The surrounding cluster is just a ghostly haze not well resolved but seeming to materialize from deep space with penetrating eyes staring at you.
 
The last surprise is back in Auriga is NGC 1907. Here the  9th magnitude star is offset from the cluster. This is in the vicinity of M38.



Re: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

Paul
 

On Sat, Jan 28, 2017 at 2:37 PM, 'Roy Diffrient' mail@... [backbayastro] <backbayastro@...> wrote:
 

Fun & games for small scopes.  I remember seeing 1907 and 2129 long ago along with M35, 36, 37, 38 but haven’t seen them lately.  With the ghostly apparition and “eyes” 2129 would be fun for Halloween – too bad it’s not higher in the sky then, but it might still be doable.
 
Roy
 
 
From: Mark Ost
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2017 1:21 PM
Subject: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes
 
I have always liked to observe small sometimes dim open clusters especially if they have a bright star involved in the cluster. These are ideal visual challenges for small telescope users. My choice of telescope is my long discontinued Televue 4 inch Genesis refractor. Last night gave me a chance to observe some of these clusters so I thought I might pass along a few that were notable:
 
NGC 1857 in the center of Auriga is a fun test of averted vision. The 7.4 magnitude bright star at the center of the cluster draws your eye to it, hiding the mist of the cluster when directly observed. Moving your eye away for the star using averted vision reveals the mist of dim stars surrounding the bright star. Larger scopes may lessen the fun of seeing the cluster so this is a good small scope object to hone your averted vision techniques
 
An easier cluster, NGC 2129, in Gemini, offers a widely spaced double star as the center for the hidden cluster. This has a striking effect. The wide double is evenly matched and resembles a pair of ghost eyes staring at you from a deep apparition. The surrounding cluster is just a ghostly haze not well resolved but seeming to materialize from deep space with penetrating eyes staring at you.
 
The last surprise is back in Auriga is NGC 1907. Here the  9th magnitude star is offset from the cluster. This is in the vicinity of M38.



Chippokes

clayers73
 

Is anyone planning on Chippokes tonight? Forecast looks good so we're planning on going (at least for a bit).

Chris


Re: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

Roy Diffrient
 

Fun & games for small scopes.  I remember seeing 1907 and 2129 long ago along with M35, 36, 37, 38 but haven’t seen them lately.  With the ghostly apparition and “eyes” 2129 would be fun for Halloween – too bad it’s not higher in the sky then, but it might still be doable.
 
Roy
 
 

From: Mark Ost
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2017 1:21 PM
Subject: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes
 
I have always liked to observe small sometimes dim open clusters especially if they have a bright star involved in the cluster. These are ideal visual challenges for small telescope users. My choice of telescope is my long discontinued Televue 4 inch Genesis refractor. Last night gave me a chance to observe some of these clusters so I thought I might pass along a few that were notable:
 
NGC 1857 in the center of Auriga is a fun test of averted vision. The 7.4 magnitude bright star at the center of the cluster draws your eye to it, hiding the mist of the cluster when directly observed. Moving your eye away for the star using averted vision reveals the mist of dim stars surrounding the bright star. Larger scopes may lessen the fun of seeing the cluster so this is a good small scope object to hone your averted vision techniques
 
An easier cluster, NGC 2129, in Gemini, offers a widely spaced double star as the center for the hidden cluster. This has a striking effect. The wide double is evenly matched and resembles a pair of ghost eyes staring at you from a deep apparition. The surrounding cluster is just a ghostly haze not well resolved but seeming to materialize from deep space with penetrating eyes staring at you.
 
The last surprise is back in Auriga is NGC 1907. Here the  9th magnitude star is offset from the cluster. This is in the vicinity of M38.


Re: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

Ted Forte
 

I looked at 1907 a couple of nights ago in my 10-inch.  Haven’t seen the others in ages. Not much of an open cluster fan as a rule.

 

Ted

 

From: Mark Ost [mailto:jimcoble2000@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2017 11:22 AM
To: Kent Blackwell ; Ted Forte ; Roy Diffrient ; Yahoogroups
Subject: Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

 

I have always liked to observe small sometimes dim open clusters especially if they have a bright star involved in the cluster. These are ideal visual challenges for small telescope users. My choice of telescope is my long discontinued Televue 4 inch Genesis refractor. Last night gave me a chance to observe some of these clusters so I thought I might pass along a few that were notable:

 

NGC 1857 in the center of Auriga is a fun test of averted vision. The 7.4 magnitude bright star at the center of the cluster draws your eye to it, hiding the mist of the cluster when directly observed. Moving your eye away for the star using averted vision reveals the mist of dim stars surrounding the bright star. Larger scopes may lessen the fun of seeing the cluster so this is a good small scope object to hone your averted vision techniques

 

An easier cluster, NGC 2129, in Gemini, offers a widely spaced double star as the center for the hidden cluster. This has a striking effect. The wide double is evenly matched and resembles a pair of ghost eyes staring at you from a deep apparition. The surrounding cluster is just a ghostly haze not well resolved but seeming to materialize from deep space with penetrating eyes staring at you.

 

The last surprise is back in Auriga is NGC 1907. Here the  9th magnitude star is offset from the cluster. This is in the vicinity of M38.


Some interesting open cluster/ star combinations for small telescopes

jimcoble2000
 

I have always liked to observe small sometimes dim open clusters especially if they have a bright star involved in the cluster. These are ideal visual challenges for small telescope users. My choice of telescope is my long discontinued Televue 4 inch Genesis refractor. Last night gave me a chance to observe some of these clusters so I thought I might pass along a few that were notable:

NGC 1857 in the center of Auriga is a fun test of averted vision. The 7.4 magnitude bright star at the center of the cluster draws your eye to it, hiding the mist of the cluster when directly observed. Moving your eye away for the star using averted vision reveals the mist of dim stars surrounding the bright star. Larger scopes may lessen the fun of seeing the cluster so this is a good small scope object to hone your averted vision techniques

An easier cluster, NGC 2129, in Gemini, offers a widely spaced double star as the center for the hidden cluster. This has a striking effect. The wide double is evenly matched and resembles a pair of ghost eyes staring at you from a deep apparition. The surrounding cluster is just a ghostly haze not well resolved but seeming to materialize from deep space with penetrating eyes staring at you.

The last surprise is back in Auriga is NGC 1907. Here the  9th magnitude star is offset from the cluster. This is in the vicinity of M38.


Re: Horsehead

galacticprobe
 

Great image! I still can't help thinking that the way the right side of "The Horsehead" has expanded since the first images I'd seen of it as a kid (and in those old science book photos on my shelf), this is starting to look more like a "Sasquatch" than a Horsehead.

Could always just be my stanky old wizzard(sic) eyes, though.

"Keep looking up!"
Dino.


-----Original Message-----
From: ian@... [backbayastro]
To: backbayastro
Sent: Thu, Jan 26, 2017 10:40 am
Subject: [backbayastro] Horsehead

 
Got out for a little bit last night until the winds picked up. Here's what I got on Barnard 33 with a few stars removed to try and highlight the wonderful nebulosity in this region.

Cheers

Ian

Emission Nebula | Barnard 33 Horsehead Nebula


Re: Horsehead

charles jagow
 

A fine equestrian image
v/r
Chuck Jagow
President - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory | N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512
Member - Norfolk County Rifle Range #1495

-----Original Message-----
From: ian@stewarteventimages.com [backbayastro] [mailto:backbayastro@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2017 10:40 AM
To: backbayastro@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [backbayastro] Horsehead

Got out for a little bit last night until the winds picked up. Here's what I got on Barnard 33 with a few stars removed to try and highlight the wonderful nebulosity in this region.

Cheers

Ian

Emission Nebula | Barnard 33 Horsehead Nebula http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h823f85c9#h823f85c9

http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h823f85c9#h823f85c9

Emission Nebula | Barnard 33 Horsehead Nebula http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h823f85c9#h823f85c9 This image of the Horsehead Nebula was taken on January 17, 2017 from my Creedmoor site and processed to remove the stars and highlight the nebulosity. T...



View on ianstewart.zenfolio.com http://ianstewart.zenfolio.com/p267909993/h823f85c9#h823f85c9
Preview by Yahoo







Re: Latest image taken...IC 2169, a reflection nebula w/ friends

charles jagow
 

Nice image
v/r
Chuck Jagow
President - Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory | N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512
Member - Norfolk County Rifle Range #1495

-----Original Message-----
From: ian@stewarteventimages.com [backbayastro] [mailto:backbayastro@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2017 10:39 AM
To: backbayastro@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [backbayastro] Re: Latest image taken...IC 2169, a reflection nebula w/ friends

Nice image Stu - love the color.. I finally got out last night as well. Hasn't been a great season for astrophotography that's for sure.

Cheers

Ian


Re: Horsehead

Stu Beaber
 


Wow Ian...that ad sounds too good to be true....I didn't know there were any pristine ST8XME's around...the guy says he selling it as a package...I never have felt a need for a AO8...and they're fairly expensive...I already have a full set of Astrodon LRGB and two 5nm Ha filters plus the SII &OIII filters...that's a bunch of bucks right there. The ST8XME I had was a class 1 chip (no defects), so he's wrong about the class 2 having no defects (not the end of the world). If I could get just the Cam & the filter wheel I'd probably jump on it... The QE is like 85%...the big draw back is you can't reach focus with 35mm camera lens unless you have a certain kind of lens which I don't...My QSI does that fine with the lens I currently have... I could make him an partial offer or buy it all and try to resell what I don't need...or chalk it up to "those ST8 days are over"
 
Tks for the temptation old buddy....*#*@
Stu
 
PS...I also have to keep my QSI for the easy stuff...and rejoin Astromart to even talk to the guy...
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2017 1:08 PM
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Horsehead

 

Hey Stu, you could always get another 8x - see the astromart ad:
Astromart Classifieds - CCD Cameras ASTRO - SBIG ST-8XME + Full Accessories (PRISTINE)

 


Cheers
Ian


Re: Horsehead

uwicb
 

Hey Stu, you could always get another 8x - see the astromart ad:
Astromart Classifieds - CCD Cameras ASTRO - SBIG ST-8XME + Full Accessories (PRISTINE)

 


Cheers
Ian


Re: Horsehead

jimcoble2000
 

I really like the way you present this. It almost looks like a terrestrial storm. Looks like you got a piece of the flame too.




From: "ian@... [backbayastro]"
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2017 10:40 AM
Subject: [backbayastro] Horsehead

 
Got out for a little bit last night until the winds picked up. Here's what I got on Barnard 33 with a few stars removed to try and highlight the wonderful nebulosity in this region.

Cheers

Ian

Emission Nebula | Barnard 33 Horsehead Nebula
 





Re: Horsehead

Stu Beaber
 


Tks Ian for looking at my IC 2169 and commenting ...I always have loved the billowing clouds seen in your Horse Head image...Well done! I had a fruitless couple nights here...24th &25th Jan... I invested 7hours 30 minutes in shooting vdB 14 & 15 and got zippo, nothing, zero...except a very deep star field shot...Oh well, the QSI cam chip is no where near the QE of my old ST8XME and I really miss that.
 
Stu
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2017 10:40 AM
Subject: [backbayastro] Horsehead

 

Got out for a little bit last night until the winds picked up. Here's what I got on Barnard 33 with a few stars removed to try and highlight the wonderful nebulosity in this region.

Cheers

Ian

Emission Nebula | Barnard 33 Horsehead Nebula

 




Horsehead

uwicb
 

Got out for a little bit last night until the winds picked up. Here's what I got on Barnard 33 with a few stars removed to try and highlight the wonderful nebulosity in this region.

Cheers

Ian

Emission Nebula | Barnard 33 Horsehead Nebula

 




Re: Latest image taken...IC 2169, a reflection nebula w/ friends

uwicb
 

Nice image Stu - love the color.. I finally got out last night as well. Hasn't been a great season for astrophotography that's for sure.

Cheers

Ian


Interesting article

jimcoble2000
 


BBAA Events - Feb. 1 - Mar. 15, 2017

Jim Tallman
 

backbayastro:

Just a note to let you know what events will be occurring in February and Early March 2017. We have quite a few public events as we as private BBAA/VPAS events scheduled for February.

Each event shows the date/Time as well as the event which can be accessed on NSN by clicking on the even title. If the event need requires volunteers there will be a RSVP requirement so that we can ensure an event is being covered adequately.

Please take some time to look over the events listed here. If there is one you would like to help out with, please go to the link and RSVP.

No need to RSVP for our BBAA private events though (Chippokes, Cornland...)

 

February 1 - March 15 Events

Start Date

Start Time

End Time

Event Name

Location Name

RSVPs

2-Feb-17

7:30 PM

9:00 PM

Club Meeting - TCC (VB Campus)

Tidewater Community College - VB Campus

NA

3-Feb-17

4:15 PM

 

VPAS: Viewing at Grundland Astronomical Park (GAP)

Grundland Astronomical Park

NA

3-Feb-17

6:30 PM

8:30 PM

Knotts Island STEM Night -NC EVENT

Knotts Island Elementary, NC

2 Yes, 0 Probably

7-Feb-17

6:00 PM

8:00 PM

Junior Astronomers Event at Three Oaks Elementary -VB

Three Oaks Elementary

5 Yes, 2 Probably

11-Feb-17

10:00 AM

1:00 PM

Saturday "SUN" Day

Elizabeth River Park

1 Yes, 0 Probably

11-Feb-17

Sunset

 

VLM Star Party

Virginia Living Museum

NA

17-Feb-17

All night

 

Corn Watch @ Cornland Park

Cornland Park

Private Event

17-Feb-17

4:15 PM

 

VPAS: Viewing at Grundland Astronomical Park (GAP)

Grundland Astronomical Park

NA

18-Feb-17

6:00 PM

10:00 PM

Skywatch @ Northwest River Park

Northwest River Park - Skywatch

1 Yes, 0 Probably

24-Feb-17

All night

 

Corn Watch @ Cornland Park

Cornland Park

Private Event

25-Feb-17

All night

 

Nightwatch @ Chippokes Plantation State Park

Chippokes Plantation State Park

Private Event

2-Mar-17

7:30 PM

9:00 PM

Club Meeting - TCC (VB Campus)

Tidewater Community College - VB Campus

NA

3-Mar-17

4:15 PM

 

VPAS: Viewing at Grundland Astronomical Park (GAP)

Grundland Astronomical Park

NA

9-Mar-17

7:00 PM

8:30 PM

Garden Stars

Norfolk Botanical Gardens

0 Yes, 0 Probably

11-Mar-17

10:00 AM

1:00 PM

Saturday "SUN" Day

Elizabeth River Park

0 Yes, 0 Probably

11-Mar-17

Sunset

 

VLM Star Party

Virginia Living Museum

NA

12-Mar-17

2:00 AM

 

Daylight Saving Time begins -BOOOOOOO!!!!!!!

 

NA



Jim Tallman
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers

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