Date   

Re: Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg

Nick Anderson
 

--- In backbayastro@..., kent@... wrote:

Ted, speaking of clouds; we had about 11 days and nights of clouds when Nova Del 2013 was brightest. Now it has slipped to 6.2 magnitude but still an easy binocular object even in severe light pollution.

NGC 6905 (The Blue Flash Nebula) Ted mentions is an easy telescope object in severe light pollution.

Kent Blackwell.

--- In backbayastro@..., "Ted Forte" <tedforte511@> wrote:

And don't forget to log NGC 6905 for the planetary nebula program! The
triangle of stars in which this PN lies adds significantly to the aesthetic
quality of the object; it is a favorite!



I've only seen the NOVA once, soon after discovery and when it was still
brightening Clouds since then. (Monsoon is almost over, I hope).



Ted

BBAA West





From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...] On
Behalf Of Paul Tartabini
Sent: Saturday, August 24, 2013 8:31 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg





Nice report, NIck.



I viewed the Nova tonight in my 10x50s as well and was surprised to see that
I could detect it has dimmed since I viewed it two nights ago. Looking at
the light curve it is now a bit dimmer than 6th magnitude.



I was also going to suggest that folks taking the time to track down Nova
Del 2013 should also look for planetary nebula NGC 6905, which is less than
a degree away. I did tonight and was pleasantly surprised. I had expected a
much tougher time from my yorktown back yard, but once in the area, I could
see the PN fairly easily in my 8" dob with a low power eyepiece. The view
was nicely enhanced with my Ultrablock filter, but was still easy to see
unfiltered. I could not make out the central star, which I later found was
magnitude 14.2 (so makes sense I couldn't see it). The nebula has a
circular shape and is located in a triangle of stars that reminded me of an
arrowhead. At higher power, I though I noticed that the nebula was brighter
near the center, but the difference in brightness was subtle.



Anyway, the nova and nebula make a real nice pairing that you should check
out.



I had heard some reports that the nova had a distinctive color, but to me it
just looked white with perhaps a hint of yellow. For now, this is a nice
binocular object and I find that the 5 deg field afforded by my binoculars
provides my favorite view.



One cloudy night post I enjoyed suggested that, for amateur observers,
tracking down the nova was akin to a earning a merit badge. Better pull out
my needle and thread ;-)



- Paul







On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 10:52 PM, Nick Anderson
<nranderson.deepskyobserver@> wrote:



It's been a while since I've taken the time to post an observing report, but
I thought I'd share one about a unique object tonight. I took advantage of
not only clear skies (a rarity the past few months), but a half hour gap
between astronomical twilight and moonrise. I used my local Blacksburg site,
typically reserved only for morning observing. Why for the mornings? It's on
the side of a residential road and the traffic is considerably diminished
after 1 am or so. Being that this observation was from 9:30-10:00 pm,
illumination from car headlights was frequent.



The special object tonight was the first I had ever observed of its kind:
Nova Delphini 2013. You may have previously heard about this naked eye nova
when it peaked at 4.3 mag. on August 16. I wanted to see if not only could I
find this guest star in Delphinus, but if it still had naked eye status.



For additional info, here's an APOD featuring the nova:

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130816.html



My original attack plan was to star hop over from Sagitta to planetary
nebula NGC 6905 (Blue Flash Nebula), then look for the nova from that
basepoint. Finding the planetary took just a few minutes. It was
surprisingly easy to spot, a non-stellar easy averted vision object (1/5) at
low power (48x). However hunting for the nova with only a general idea where
it might be proved frustrating in the telescope. Instead I pulled out my
10x50 binoculars for a larger field and less stars.



I spent a few minutes (in between car headlight interference) familiarizing
myself with the charted stars to, by process of elimination, find the one
that was "missing" in binoculars. Now that I had the nova's position, I went
back to the scope. Thanks to already having found NGC 6905, it took little
time to center in on the nova. Using my scope's red dot finder, now it was
time to search for it naked eye. In the telescope I observed that the nova
was just a smidgen dimmer than nearby 5.65 mag. yellow-hued HR 7811.
Although difficult, it was not impossible to catch a few naked eye glimpses
of the nova from my upper-5th magnitude site. I'd recommend trying for
yourself if you get a chance in the near future.



-Nick Anderson


Princess Anne Library event September 13

George Reynolds
 

Calling all BBAA members!

Here is an EXCELLENT way for some of the newer members of the club to get active!  Just ask Leigh Anne Lagoe or Don & Toni Rozelle-Rosio, new members who have jumped in with both feet and found it to be fun and educational.

Friday, September 13 an event is scheduled at Princess Anne Area Library on Nimmo Parkway down by the oceanfront, off General Booth Blvd.  The tentative agenda is this:

"Participants will start arriving at 6:00. Settled in the meeting room, Josie Bergstrom and Susana Francisco of the library staff will inform them of what they would expect about the program and introduce everybody. The speaker will start at around 6:15. After the presentation of the speaker, we could have a scavenger hunt while awaiting for the 7:30 stargazing opportunity."

Sunset is 7:15 PM, and the First Quarter Moon will be high in the sky.  Twilight ends at 8:42 PM (astronomical twilight), so only the brightest objects will be visible at the start of stargazing.   Although it is called a "Galaxy Watch", it will not be dark enough to see any galaxies, but that shouldn't matter.  When folks get to see the Moon up close and personal in a telescope, they usually get their socks knocked off.

So, for any "newbies" to the club, c'mon out!  Even if you think you don't know enough, you will know more than the average visitor who comes to look through our telescopes.  And you will LEARN by standing beside one of the more experienced (dare I say "older"?) club members just listening and asking questions.

Since this is scheduled on a "Garden Stars" night, I might not be available, unless (a) the Norfolk Botanical Garden cancels due to low enrollment, or (b) I can get another club member to take my place at Garden Stars.

George


Re: Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg

Kent Blackwell
 

Ted, speaking of clouds; we had about 11 days and nights of clouds when Nova Del 2013 was brightest. Now it has slipped to 6.2 magnitude but still an easy binocular object even in severe light pollution.

NGC 6905 (The Blue Flash Nebula) Ted mentions is an easy telescope object in severe light pollution.

Kent Blackwell.

--- In backbayastro@..., "Ted Forte" <tedforte511@...> wrote:

And don't forget to log NGC 6905 for the planetary nebula program! The
triangle of stars in which this PN lies adds significantly to the aesthetic
quality of the object; it is a favorite!



I've only seen the NOVA once, soon after discovery and when it was still
brightening Clouds since then. (Monsoon is almost over, I hope).



Ted

BBAA West





From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...] On
Behalf Of Paul Tartabini
Sent: Saturday, August 24, 2013 8:31 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg





Nice report, NIck.



I viewed the Nova tonight in my 10x50s as well and was surprised to see that
I could detect it has dimmed since I viewed it two nights ago. Looking at
the light curve it is now a bit dimmer than 6th magnitude.



I was also going to suggest that folks taking the time to track down Nova
Del 2013 should also look for planetary nebula NGC 6905, which is less than
a degree away. I did tonight and was pleasantly surprised. I had expected a
much tougher time from my yorktown back yard, but once in the area, I could
see the PN fairly easily in my 8" dob with a low power eyepiece. The view
was nicely enhanced with my Ultrablock filter, but was still easy to see
unfiltered. I could not make out the central star, which I later found was
magnitude 14.2 (so makes sense I couldn't see it). The nebula has a
circular shape and is located in a triangle of stars that reminded me of an
arrowhead. At higher power, I though I noticed that the nebula was brighter
near the center, but the difference in brightness was subtle.



Anyway, the nova and nebula make a real nice pairing that you should check
out.



I had heard some reports that the nova had a distinctive color, but to me it
just looked white with perhaps a hint of yellow. For now, this is a nice
binocular object and I find that the 5 deg field afforded by my binoculars
provides my favorite view.



One cloudy night post I enjoyed suggested that, for amateur observers,
tracking down the nova was akin to a earning a merit badge. Better pull out
my needle and thread ;-)



- Paul







On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 10:52 PM, Nick Anderson
<nranderson.deepskyobserver@...> wrote:



It's been a while since I've taken the time to post an observing report, but
I thought I'd share one about a unique object tonight. I took advantage of
not only clear skies (a rarity the past few months), but a half hour gap
between astronomical twilight and moonrise. I used my local Blacksburg site,
typically reserved only for morning observing. Why for the mornings? It's on
the side of a residential road and the traffic is considerably diminished
after 1 am or so. Being that this observation was from 9:30-10:00 pm,
illumination from car headlights was frequent.



The special object tonight was the first I had ever observed of its kind:
Nova Delphini 2013. You may have previously heard about this naked eye nova
when it peaked at 4.3 mag. on August 16. I wanted to see if not only could I
find this guest star in Delphinus, but if it still had naked eye status.



For additional info, here's an APOD featuring the nova:

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130816.html



My original attack plan was to star hop over from Sagitta to planetary
nebula NGC 6905 (Blue Flash Nebula), then look for the nova from that
basepoint. Finding the planetary took just a few minutes. It was
surprisingly easy to spot, a non-stellar easy averted vision object (1/5) at
low power (48x). However hunting for the nova with only a general idea where
it might be proved frustrating in the telescope. Instead I pulled out my
10x50 binoculars for a larger field and less stars.



I spent a few minutes (in between car headlight interference) familiarizing
myself with the charted stars to, by process of elimination, find the one
that was "missing" in binoculars. Now that I had the nova's position, I went
back to the scope. Thanks to already having found NGC 6905, it took little
time to center in on the nova. Using my scope's red dot finder, now it was
time to search for it naked eye. In the telescope I observed that the nova
was just a smidgen dimmer than nearby 5.65 mag. yellow-hued HR 7811.
Although difficult, it was not impossible to catch a few naked eye glimpses
of the nova from my upper-5th magnitude site. I'd recommend trying for
yourself if you get a chance in the near future.



-Nick Anderson


Re: Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg

Ted Forte
 

And don’t forget to log NGC 6905 for the planetary nebula program!  The triangle of stars in which this PN lies adds significantly to the aesthetic quality of the object; it is a favorite! 

 

I’ve only seen the NOVA once, soon after discovery and when it was still brightening  Clouds since then.  (Monsoon is almost over, I hope). 

 

Ted

BBAA West

 

 

From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...] On Behalf Of Paul Tartabini
Sent: Saturday, August 24, 2013 8:31 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg

 

 

Nice report, NIck.

 

I viewed the Nova tonight in my 10x50s as well and was surprised to see that I could detect it has dimmed since I viewed it two nights ago. Looking at the light curve it is now a bit dimmer than 6th magnitude.

 

I was also going to suggest that folks taking the time to track down Nova Del 2013 should also look for planetary nebula NGC 6905, which is less than a degree away. I did tonight and was pleasantly surprised. I had expected a much tougher time from my yorktown back yard, but once in the area, I could see the PN fairly easily in my 8" dob with a low power eyepiece. The view was nicely enhanced with my Ultrablock filter, but was still easy to see unfiltered. I could not make out the central star, which I later found was magnitude 14.2 (so makes sense I couldn't see it).  The nebula has a circular shape and is located in a triangle of stars that reminded me of an arrowhead. At higher power, I though I noticed that the nebula was brighter near the center, but the difference in brightness was subtle.

 

Anyway, the nova and nebula make a real nice pairing that you should check out.

 

I had heard some reports that the nova had a distinctive color, but to me it just looked white with perhaps a hint of yellow. For now, this is a nice binocular object and I find that the 5 deg field afforded by my binoculars provides my favorite view.

 

One cloudy night post I enjoyed suggested that, for amateur observers, tracking down the nova was akin to a earning a merit badge. Better pull out my needle and thread   ;-)

 

- Paul

 

 

 

On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 10:52 PM, Nick Anderson <nranderson.deepskyobserver@...> wrote:

 

It's been a while since I've taken the time to post an observing report, but I thought I'd share one about a unique object tonight. I took advantage of not only clear skies (a rarity the past few months), but a half hour gap between astronomical twilight and moonrise. I used my local Blacksburg site, typically reserved only for morning observing. Why for the mornings? It's on the side of a residential road and the traffic is considerably diminished after 1 am or so. Being that this observation was from 9:30-10:00 pm, illumination from car headlights was frequent.

 

The special object tonight was the first I had ever observed of its kind: Nova Delphini 2013. You may have previously heard about this naked eye nova when it peaked at 4.3 mag. on August 16. I wanted to see if not only could I find this guest star in Delphinus, but if it still had naked eye status.

 

For additional info, here's an APOD featuring the nova:

 

My original attack plan was to star hop over from Sagitta to planetary nebula NGC 6905 (Blue Flash Nebula), then look for the nova from that basepoint. Finding the planetary took just a few minutes. It was surprisingly easy to spot, a non-stellar easy averted vision object (1/5) at low power (48x). However hunting for the nova with only a general idea where it might be proved frustrating in the telescope. Instead I pulled out my 10x50 binoculars for a larger field and less stars.

 

I spent a few minutes (in between car headlight interference) familiarizing myself with the charted stars to, by process of elimination, find the one that was "missing" in binoculars. Now that I had the nova's position, I went back to the scope. Thanks to already having found NGC 6905, it took little time to center in on the nova. Using my scope's red dot finder, now it was time to search for it naked eye. In the telescope I observed that the nova was just a smidgen dimmer than nearby 5.65 mag. yellow-hued HR 7811. Although difficult, it was not impossible to catch a few naked eye glimpses of the nova from my upper-5th magnitude site. I'd recommend trying for yourself if you get a chance in the near future.

 

-Nick Anderson

 


Re: Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg

Paul
 

Nice report, NIck.

I viewed the Nova tonight in my 10x50s as well and was surprised to see that I could detect it has dimmed since I viewed it two nights ago. Looking at the light curve it is now a bit dimmer than 6th magnitude.

I was also going to suggest that folks taking the time to track down Nova Del 2013 should also look for planetary nebula NGC 6905, which is less than a degree away. I did tonight and was pleasantly surprised. I had expected a much tougher time from my yorktown back yard, but once in the area, I could see the PN fairly easily in my 8" dob with a low power eyepiece. The view was nicely enhanced with my Ultrablock filter, but was still easy to see unfiltered. I could not make out the central star, which I later found was magnitude 14.2 (so makes sense I couldn't see it).  The nebula has a circular shape and is located in a triangle of stars that reminded me of an arrowhead. At higher power, I though I noticed that the nebula was brighter near the center, but the difference in brightness was subtle.

Anyway, the nova and nebula make a real nice pairing that you should check out.

I had heard some reports that the nova had a distinctive color, but to me it just looked white with perhaps a hint of yellow. For now, this is a nice binocular object and I find that the 5 deg field afforded by my binoculars provides my favorite view.

One cloudy night post I enjoyed suggested that, for amateur observers, tracking down the nova was akin to a earning a merit badge. Better pull out my needle and thread   ;-)

- Paul




On Sat, Aug 24, 2013 at 10:52 PM, Nick Anderson <nranderson.deepskyobserver@...> wrote:
 

It's been a while since I've taken the time to post an observing report, but I thought I'd share one about a unique object tonight. I took advantage of not only clear skies (a rarity the past few months), but a half hour gap between astronomical twilight and moonrise. I used my local Blacksburg site, typically reserved only for morning observing. Why for the mornings? It's on the side of a residential road and the traffic is considerably diminished after 1 am or so. Being that this observation was from 9:30-10:00 pm, illumination from car headlights was frequent.

The special object tonight was the first I had ever observed of its kind: Nova Delphini 2013. You may have previously heard about this naked eye nova when it peaked at 4.3 mag. on August 16. I wanted to see if not only could I find this guest star in Delphinus, but if it still had naked eye status.

For additional info, here's an APOD featuring the nova:

My original attack plan was to star hop over from Sagitta to planetary nebula NGC 6905 (Blue Flash Nebula), then look for the nova from that basepoint. Finding the planetary took just a few minutes. It was surprisingly easy to spot, a non-stellar easy averted vision object (1/5) at low power (48x). However hunting for the nova with only a general idea where it might be proved frustrating in the telescope. Instead I pulled out my 10x50 binoculars for a larger field and less stars.

I spent a few minutes (in between car headlight interference) familiarizing myself with the charted stars to, by process of elimination, find the one that was "missing" in binoculars. Now that I had the nova's position, I went back to the scope. Thanks to already having found NGC 6905, it took little time to center in on the nova. Using my scope's red dot finder, now it was time to search for it naked eye. In the telescope I observed that the nova was just a smidgen dimmer than nearby 5.65 mag. yellow-hued HR 7811. Although difficult, it was not impossible to catch a few naked eye glimpses of the nova from my upper-5th magnitude site. I'd recommend trying for yourself if you get a chance in the near future.

-Nick Anderson



Re: New AL Programs

Nick Anderson
 

Thanks Paul, I noticed this the other day. I'm rather excited about the Bright Nebula Program. I had always wondered why there wasn't something similar up until this point before. A lot of my favorite objects are on that list, as well as probably some future favorites! ;)

-Nick Anderson

--- In backbayastro@..., Paul Tartabini <paultar@...> wrote:

Bright Nebula Program<http://astroleague.org/content/bright-nebula-observing-program>

and

Hydrogren Alpha Solar Observing
Program<http://www.astroleague.org/content/new-hydrogen-alpha-solar-observing-program>


Nova Delphini 2013 from Blacksburg

Nick Anderson
 

It's been a while since I've taken the time to post an observing report, but I thought I'd share one about a unique object tonight. I took advantage of not only clear skies (a rarity the past few months), but a half hour gap between astronomical twilight and moonrise. I used my local Blacksburg site, typically reserved only for morning observing. Why for the mornings? It's on the side of a residential road and the traffic is considerably diminished after 1 am or so. Being that this observation was from 9:30-10:00 pm, illumination from car headlights was frequent.

The special object tonight was the first I had ever observed of its kind: Nova Delphini 2013. You may have previously heard about this naked eye nova when it peaked at 4.3 mag. on August 16. I wanted to see if not only could I find this guest star in Delphinus, but if it still had naked eye status.

For additional info, here's an APOD featuring the nova:

My original attack plan was to star hop over from Sagitta to planetary nebula NGC 6905 (Blue Flash Nebula), then look for the nova from that basepoint. Finding the planetary took just a few minutes. It was surprisingly easy to spot, a non-stellar easy averted vision object (1/5) at low power (48x). However hunting for the nova with only a general idea where it might be proved frustrating in the telescope. Instead I pulled out my 10x50 binoculars for a larger field and less stars.

I spent a few minutes (in between car headlight interference) familiarizing myself with the charted stars to, by process of elimination, find the one that was "missing" in binoculars. Now that I had the nova's position, I went back to the scope. Thanks to already having found NGC 6905, it took little time to center in on the nova. Using my scope's red dot finder, now it was time to search for it naked eye. In the telescope I observed that the nova was just a smidgen dimmer than nearby 5.65 mag. yellow-hued HR 7811. Although difficult, it was not impossible to catch a few naked eye glimpses of the nova from my upper-5th magnitude site. I'd recommend trying for yourself if you get a chance in the near future.

-Nick Anderson


Re: Back bay Boardwalk Astronomy -- Sorry I missed it.

charles jagow
 

George,

You can probably take the starter apart and CLEAN it out and perhaps put a new spring and solenoid in it. My Harley has the same issue every few years and just needs the spring and contact washers cleaned/replaced. Good luck.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
NCRR #1495 & Newsletter Editor
VP Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory
N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512

-----Original Message-----
From: George Reynolds [mailto:pathfinder027@...]
Sent: Saturday, August 24, 2013 08:43 AM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] Back bay Boardwalk Astronomy -- Sorry I missed it.

Sorry I missed BWA Thursday night.  My car wouldn't start after I got gas at Sam's Club.  The battery was plenty strong enough, but the starter wouldn't turn.  A guy gave me a jump, but that didn't work, so he and I pushed the Jeep away from the gas pumps to await further help.

I had no tools, but before I called AAA, I walked across the street to Home Depot and bought some wrenches and pliers.  I cleaned the battery terminals, but that didn't help.

Then I remembered a car I once had a long time ago that, now and again, I had to beat on the starter with a hammer to get it to operate.  I crawled under my Jeep, banged on the starter with a wrench, and -- Voila! -- it started.  Not wanting to take a chance with it, I limped home and didn't try to get to the oceanfront.  I may have to replace the starter.  I will keep the tools in that car.

George
 

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org

 



________________________________
From: Charles JAGOW <chuck@...>
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2013 10:55 AM
Subject: [backbayastro] Back bay Boardwalk Atronomy



 
Despite the fact we were NOT in our normal place AND that the damn boardwalk lights remained ON during the entire evening. I greatly appreciate everyone's participation. Thanks to:

Mark Gerlach & hoard,
Kent of Blackwell,
Chuck Dibbs, VB Planetarium HMFC,
Dale Carey, (retired esq.),
me,
Toni and Don Rosio, (WHOO HOO!! P A R T I C I P A T I N G New Memebers)
Jeff Goldstien, Teacher extrordinaire,
Anyone I might have forgotten and not seen.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!

The next and last Boardwalk Astronomy Gig is on September 17th, our probable only target will be the moon and stars (can't wait to spend the whole night on Albireo), as Saturn will be history (below buildings and such) Jupiter will have set, so unless we can find Uranus and/or Neptune planets will be a no show.

The Skywatch on the 30th at the NWRP will be sans myself, I will be in Colorado enjoying mag OH-MY-GOD skies. I will take my SQL meter and take a reading so we can compare it to Coinjock.

See you all in several weeks at the last Boardwalk Astronomy.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
NCRR #1495 & Newsletter Editor
VP Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory
N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512





Re: Back bay Boardwalk Astronomy -- Sorry I missed it.

George Reynolds
 

Sorry I missed BWA Thursday night.  My car wouldn't start after I got gas at Sam's Club.  The battery was plenty strong enough, but the starter wouldn't turn.  A guy gave me a jump, but that didn't work, so he and I pushed the Jeep away from the gas pumps to await further help.

I had no tools, but before I called AAA, I walked across the street to Home Depot and bought some wrenches and pliers.  I cleaned the battery terminals, but that didn't help.

Then I remembered a car I once had a long time ago that, now and again, I had to beat on the starter with a hammer to get it to operate.  I crawled under my Jeep, banged on the starter with a wrench, and -- Voila! -- it started.  Not wanting to take a chance with it, I limped home and didn't try to get to the oceanfront.  I may have to replace the starter.  I will keep the tools in that car.

George
 

George Reynolds

"Solar System Ambassador" for South Hampton Roads, Virginia
Back Bay Amateur Astronomers (BBAA) 
http://www.backbayastro.org


 


From: Charles JAGOW
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2013 10:55 AM
Subject: [backbayastro] Back bay Boardwalk Atronomy

 
Despite the fact we were NOT in our normal place AND that the damn boardwalk lights remained ON during the entire evening. I greatly appreciate everyone's participation. Thanks to:

Mark Gerlach & hoard,
Kent of Blackwell,
Chuck Dibbs, VB Planetarium HMFC,
Dale Carey, (retired esq.),
me,
Toni and Don Rosio, (WHOO HOO!! P A R T I C I P A T I N G New Memebers)
Jeff Goldstien, Teacher extrordinaire,
Anyone I might have forgotten and not seen.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!

The next and last Boardwalk Astronomy Gig is on September 17th, our probable only target will be the moon and stars (can't wait to spend the whole night on Albireo), as Saturn will be history (below buildings and such) Jupiter will have set, so unless we can find Uranus and/or Neptune planets will be a no show.

The Skywatch on the 30th at the NWRP will be sans myself, I will be in Colorado enjoying mag OH-MY-GOD skies. I will take my SQL meter and take a reading so we can compare it to Coinjock.

See you all in several weeks at the last Boardwalk Astronomy.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
NCRR #1495 & Newsletter Editor
VP Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory
N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512




Re: Back bay Boardwalk Atronomy

gerlach.mark
 

Wow!. Wait til I tell the twins that they qualify as a "hoard".
errr. maybe I better not, they might try to l1ve up to the name!!
I was able to track Saturn in the 12" for most of the evening. Tom and Chris enjoyed showing people the Moon, Albireo, Mizar/Alcor in their 6"
I think we saw 100 to 150 people down at our end.
Toward the end of the evening, I was actually able to get the Ring, M57, and show it to some late-comers. It was faint and washed out, but visible.
/&#92;&#92;2

--- In backbayastro@..., "Charles JAGOW" <chuck@...> wrote:

Despite the fact we were NOT in our normal place AND that the damn boardwalk lights remained ON during the entire evening. I greatly appreciate everyone's participation. Thanks to:

Mark Gerlach & hoard,
Kent of Blackwell,
Chuck Dibbs, VB Planetarium HMFC,
Dale Carey, (retired esq.),
me,
Toni and Don Rosio, (WHOO HOO!! P A R T I C I P A T I N G New Memebers)
Jeff Goldstien, Teacher extrordinaire,
Anyone I might have forgotten and not seen.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!

The next and last Boardwalk Astronomy Gig is on September 17th, our probable only target will be the moon and stars (can't wait to spend the whole night on Albireo), as Saturn will be history (below buildings and such) Jupiter will have set, so unless we can find Uranus and/or Neptune planets will be a no show.

The Skywatch on the 30th at the NWRP will be sans myself, I will be in Colorado enjoying mag OH-MY-GOD skies. I will take my SQL meter and take a reading so we can compare it to Coinjock.

See you all in several weeks at the last Boardwalk Astronomy.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
NCRR #1495 & Newsletter Editor
VP Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory
N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512


Re: Back bay Boardwalk Atronomy

tlroze
 

We had a great time and learned A LOT of information from everyone!
Thanks so much guys -
Toni & Don Rosio

--- In backbayastro@..., "Charles JAGOW" <chuck@...> wrote:

Despite the fact we were NOT in our normal place AND that the damn boardwalk lights remained ON during the entire evening. I greatly appreciate everyone's participation. Thanks to:

Mark Gerlach & hoard,
Kent of Blackwell,
Chuck Dibbs, VB Planetarium HMFC,
Dale Carey, (retired esq.),
me,
Toni and Don Rosio, (WHOO HOO!! P A R T I C I P A T I N G New Memebers)
Jeff Goldstien, Teacher extrordinaire,
Anyone I might have forgotten and not seen.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!

The next and last Boardwalk Astronomy Gig is on September 17th, our probable only target will be the moon and stars (can't wait to spend the whole night on Albireo), as Saturn will be history (below buildings and such) Jupiter will have set, so unless we can find Uranus and/or Neptune planets will be a no show.

The Skywatch on the 30th at the NWRP will be sans myself, I will be in Colorado enjoying mag OH-MY-GOD skies. I will take my SQL meter and take a reading so we can compare it to Coinjock.

See you all in several weeks at the last Boardwalk Astronomy.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
NCRR #1495 & Newsletter Editor
VP Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory
N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512


Back bay Boardwalk Atronomy

charles jagow
 

Despite the fact we were NOT in our normal place AND that the damn boardwalk lights remained ON during the entire evening. I greatly appreciate everyone's participation. Thanks to:

Mark Gerlach & hoard,
Kent of Blackwell,
Chuck Dibbs, VB Planetarium HMFC,
Dale Carey, (retired esq.),
me,
Toni and Don Rosio, (WHOO HOO!! P A R T I C I P A T I N G New Memebers)
Jeff Goldstien, Teacher extrordinaire,
Anyone I might have forgotten and not seen.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!

The next and last Boardwalk Astronomy Gig is on September 17th, our probable only target will be the moon and stars (can't wait to spend the whole night on Albireo), as Saturn will be history (below buildings and such) Jupiter will have set, so unless we can find Uranus and/or Neptune planets will be a no show.

The Skywatch on the 30th at the NWRP will be sans myself, I will be in Colorado enjoying mag OH-MY-GOD skies. I will take my SQL meter and take a reading so we can compare it to Coinjock.

See you all in several weeks at the last Boardwalk Astronomy.

v/r
Chuck Jagow
NCRR #1495 & Newsletter Editor
VP Back Bay Amateur Astronomers
Rott'n Paws Observatory
N36:46:23.281 W076:13:31.512


Re: New AL Programs

preciousmyprecious
 

Thanks Paul. You must have your finger on the AL pulse! 

Even if one doesn't do these programs (but I hope you do) there are many excellent ideas for seeing and describing objects seen. 

Also- check out the names in the nebula program- they're right up Paul's alley! Some are pretty funny. 
I knew Paul was hooked when the list starts out with the Pacman Nebula! 

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


From: Paul Tartabini
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 11:19 PM
Subject: [backbayastro] New AL Programs


Re: I'm going out on a limb

preciousmyprecious
 

sounds like a road trip
 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


From: bob414
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:49 PM
Subject: RE: [backbayastro] I'm going out on a limb

 
I volunteer to pitch in my 2 cents and a couple of cookies.
 
Bob
 
From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...] On Behalf Of Paul Tartabini
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:04 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] I'm going out on a limb
 
 
Probably need the newsletter editor as well...
 
On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 6:28 PM, William McLean <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:
 
and will volunteer to have you send your ALCOR on the Sky & Tel. junket to Chile. I'll sent pictures back.
 
 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean
 



Re: I'm going out on a limb

preciousmyprecious
 

I imagine so.
 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean


From: Paul Tartabini
To: backbayastro@...
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:04 PM
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] I'm going out on a limb

 
Probably need the newsletter editor as well...


On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 6:28 PM, William McLean <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:
 
and will volunteer to have you send your ALCOR on the Sky & Tel. junket to Chile. I'll sent pictures back.

 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean




New AL Programs

Paul
 


Re: I'm going out on a limb

bob414
 

I volunteer to pitch in my 2 cents and a couple of cookies.

 

Bob

 

From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...] On Behalf Of Paul Tartabini
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 9:04 PM
To: backbayastro@...
Subject: Re: [backbayastro] I'm going out on a limb

 

 

Probably need the newsletter editor as well...

 

On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 6:28 PM, William McLean <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:

 

and will volunteer to have you send your ALCOR on the Sky & Tel. junket to Chile. I'll sent pictures back.

 

 

Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean

 


Re: I'm going out on a limb

Paul
 

Probably need the newsletter editor as well...


On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 6:28 PM, William McLean <preciousmyprecious@...> wrote:
 

and will volunteer to have you send your ALCOR on the Sky & Tel. junket to Chile. I'll sent pictures back.

 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean



Re: Fw: We Are Go

Jeff Goldstein
 

C U there

 

Sincerely,

 

Jeff Goldstein

www.jeffgold.net

NAR #81619 L3

TRA#04764 L3

 

From: backbayastro@... [mailto:backbayastro@...] On Behalf Of Dale
Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 4:21 PM
To: BBAA
Subject: [backbayastro] Fw: We Are Go

 

 

 

 

Sent: Thursday, August 22, 2013 4:08 PM

Subject: We Are Go

 

We are go for tonight.  Please remember to emphasize to BBAA that they will enter at 22nd street tonight.  I’ll be down there to help guide by 6pm at the latest.

 

 

Charles Dibbs

 

Planetarium Coordinator

Virginia Beach City Public Schools

3080 S. Lynnhaven rd.

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452

757-648-4940

www.planetarium.vbschools.com

 


I'm going out on a limb

preciousmyprecious
 

and will volunteer to have you send your ALCOR on the Sky & Tel. junket to Chile. I'll sent pictures back.

 
Carpe Noctem
Bill McLean

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