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My new V6 and what I learned from this group

McRuss
 

Well, I finally wired up a power cord and an antenna adapter.  From the group, I learned that I plugged the encoder into the board instead of the arduino to begin with.  Then I used info from the group to figure out that I had a bad speaker (now I have to source another one).  I rigged up a temporary fix for the speaker and actually started hearing some QSO's on 20M!  Feel pretty good about everything now EXCEPT.....I guess my software is the initial 6.1, at least that is what the display says.  Soon as I make my first contact, I'll start to think about upgrading software.  Oh, I digress...the EXCEPT is the volume control:  if I had to guess, I'd say it is bad.  Volume is OK at the lower settings and noise level is great BUT when I try to turn up the volume, I get big burst of static and nothing else.  It seems that wiggling the control shaft makes it come and go.  Any thoughts on this?  Oh, one other possible issue:  my one attempt at transmitting was interesting.  The vfo jumped from 20 to 40 when I attempted to transmit.  It only did it a couple times but then seemed to settle down.  Very little band activity so I didn't try any further.
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Newbie Russ
K5FJR

McRuss
 

I need to clarify what happened when I keyed the mike:  the display jumped from B (set up with a 20m freq) to A, set up with a 40m freq.  I don't know if the actual TX frequency changed but the display did.
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Newbie
K5FJR

Evan Hand
 

Per your description, I would suspect that it is RF feedback into the rig.  Try transmitting into a dummy load. I had the issue with my off-center feed dipole.  Had to ground the rig better, and then put a common mode chock on the coax cable feeding the shack.  That did it for me.

As to the volume control, I would send an email to HF Signals explaining the issue and request a replacement. It will mean removing the control from the boar and replacing it.  I do not have a v6, so I cannot comment on how difficult that would be.

Other things to try:
- inspect the solder joints of the volume control with a magnifying lens.  Touch up any that look suspicious 
- try spraying the volume control with contact leaner and see if that helps.

The above are just suggestions.  Others may have some to add.
73
Evan
AC9TU

mymonte666@...
 

About the static noise with the volume knob: i had my ubitx v6 running with factory software and hardware for about a week just fine with no noise or static. 
After getting lost doing the calibration, decided to download and reinstall the factory software again. 
Then is was when the static issue on the vol knob presented itself. 

It would only happen when i touched the knob. But if i touched the knob while touching the antenna connector it would stop. The weird thing is that it would only stop by touching the antenna while holding the knob, i tried touching various ground points and no change. 

Last week i changed to the nextion 2.8 and the cec software and the issue dissapeared. I did this on a spare arduino, so i still have the stock one loaded with the factory stuff. 
Once i get everything situated with the cec software, i want to go back and look into the static issue, since to me it seems to be software related. 

KO4BYI
Luis. 

McRuss
 

Thanks for the suggestions.  As for RF leakage, I'm in a situation where my dummy load is in a different state so can't do that.  I also have an issue with grounding since I'm in a condo with limited access to 'ground.'  But my other HF rigs seem to be OK with the same feed line. 

And I'd like to get a new volume control but with nothing being shipped from India at this time (and who knows for how long), that is probably out of the question.  I've inspected the solder on the control and they look fine under magnification.  Not a difficult job to replace if/when that becomes a viable option.  In the mean time, I'm trying to find a good speaker as that MIGHT be part of the volume issue.  I'm going to try spraying the control next to see if that will help.

Thanks again, this group is a great source of info for us, especially those with limited technical knowledge.
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Newbie
K5FJR

Ted
 

K5FJR de K3RTA,

This static of which you speak, is it there mainly when you're transmitting, or at any time? I ask, because it smacks of RF infiltration (or "leakage).

Your other rigs may not have this problem because of more commercial-grade internal shielding or other refinements that are above the price point of a good seed kit like uBitx. 

May I ask the antenna design? I'm mainly curious because you've got a WORKING condo antenna, apparently (uBitx RF issues aside).  I'm trying to get a condo-owning friend to believe she Can do HF from her place.

For yourself, an end-fed half wave using very fine magnet or choke coil wire out to a tree or hanging down against a brick wall might be worth trying, partly because I've been playing with such designs and they seem fine from an RF intrusion point of view. 

So HW?

Ted
K3RTA

Ted
 

Oh, and for a dummy load in a pinch [at these power levels], get an 1157 tail light bulb and solder both filaments (pin) & shell (earth) to a male BNC or whatever you're using.

I wouldn't keep it key-down for more than 10-15 seconds; it's not necessarily a well-matched load but it will give the energy someplace to go AND you get visual proof of life.


Ted
K3RTA

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Ted,

I have used incandescent bulbs as dummy loads too. I did that a lot with vacuum tube finals but it works for solid state too. Not only is it *not* a 50 ohm resistive load but the impedance changes dramatically from cold filament to glowing hot filament. Yet - it works.

If you have a light bulb connected to a transceiver (or just your receiver) you will be able to hear many of the stronger signals and they can hear your transmitter too. I have a nice, 100 watt, shielded, 50 ohm resistive dummy load. I can hear a few signals in the receiver with that dummy load and I expect others can hear my transmitter if us light it up. Hams have conducted QSOs on dummy loads. Some of our outdoor antennas are pretty much dummy loads too. Always check for a clear frequency before you start testing your transmitter - even with a dummy load.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 3/31/20 8:10 PM, Ted via Groups.Io wrote:
Oh, and for a dummy load in a pinch [at these power levels], get an 1157 tail light bulb and solder both filaments (pin) & shell (earth) to a male BNC or whatever you're using.
I wouldn't keep it key-down for more than 10-15 seconds; it's not necessarily a well-matched load but it will give the energy someplace to go AND you get visual proof of life.
Ted
K3RTA
--
bark less - wag more

McRuss
 

K3RTA and the Group, DE K5FJR,

My antenna is a 'Super Antenna" clamped to the railing of my balcony.  Two radials run out and down INSIDE two gutter drains!  It is not invisible but is not too obvious (no comments from the HOA yet.)  It is tuneable for 10-40 and can be adapted for 2m and 80 - 60.  Here is the link: newsuperantenna.com
I recall using a 60 watt bulb back in the 70's for a dummy load, might try wiring up something like that.  I do think the issue is the short coax adapter I built for BNC to PL259 so I've ordered an commercial version (my supply of connectors has been depleted over the years and I couldn't find a real good one in the junk bin!)  The volume static is there during receive and seems to be when receiving a station; I can turn the volume up OK until someone speaks and then the audio causes unreadable static.  I'm hampered by being quarantined and I need a better speaker too!

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Newbie
K5FJR

Ted
 

I'd go to kitsandparts.com and order a T200-2 torroid, then, pass your lead-in coax through it as many times as it will fit (but a minimium of 4, maybe 5, passes).  This will serve to clamp down on stray RF that may well be following the outside jacket into your radio. Place this on the coax close to the entry point into the condo.  Shipping is quick and they also have some other neat parts that you may find helpful while sequestered during the plague  :)  

As for light bulbs for testing in a pinch, I do recall using a 60-watt bulb on my Heathkit HW-60 (?) novice transmitter.  Those days were magic, seemingly. The excitement of firing up the rig - real radios glow in the dark - and banging away at code to the far reaches of the continent. It's still amazing but as a novice, it was really cool. The graphic demo with a light bulb kind of drove the point home that RF is a true energy form and that the antenna was actually DOING something even though it didn't glow.



72,

Ted
K3RTA



Justice will not come (to Athens) until those who are not injured are as indignant as those who are injured.

Thucydides



On Wednesday, April 1, 2020, 10:39:35 AM EDT, McRuss via Groups.Io <wtrrtw@...> wrote:


K3RTA and the Group, DE K5FJR,

My antenna is a 'Super Antenna" clamped to the railing of my balcony.  Two radials run out and down INSIDE two gutter drains!  It is not invisible but is not too obvious (no comments from the HOA yet.)  It is tuneable for 10-40 and can be adapted for 2m and 80 - 60.  Here is the link: newsuperantenna.com
I recall using a 60 watt bulb back in the 70's for a dummy load, might try wiring up something like that.  I do think the issue is the short coax adapter I built for BNC to PL259 so I've ordered an commercial version (my supply of connectors has been depleted over the years and I couldn't find a real good one in the junk bin!)  The volume static is there during receive and seems to be when receiving a station; I can turn the volume up OK until someone speaks and then the audio causes unreadable static.  I'm hampered by being quarantined and I need a better speaker too!

--
Newbie
K5FJR

 

Hi,

If the gutter drain pipes are aluminum, I don't think your radials will be doing much?  The field from them will be blocked by the pipes I think.  The railing of your balcony may do better if it is a continuous piece of metal.

I'd check the adapter for shield and center conductivity while wiggling the cable around.  Also you can check it while connected by moving it around and listening for movement induced static noise.

73,


Mark

McRuss
 

I thought the same thing about the radials BUT the antenna is doing great with them in that configuration (maybe the aluminum downspouts are working to augment the radials?) and that is what counts when working from a condo! Worked a station in CA from NM today with 85 watts and got a 59 report.  I ran the rig with a different speaker and a quick-build dummy load and with the original coax gone, no static.  So I'm convinced that was the problem.  Waiting now for a real adapter (but I'm going to have to wait, moving my QTH back to 'home' for a few weeks as my job has been curtailed for an unknown period.)
--
Russ
K5FJR

Frank Dinger , EI7KS
 

On Tue, Mar 31, 2020 at 07:29 PM, McRuss wrote:
Thanks for the suggestions.  As for RF leakage, I'm in a situation where my dummy load is in a different state so can't do that.  I also have an issue with grounding since I'm in a condo with limited access to 'ground.'  But my other HF rigs seem to be OK with the same feed line. 
If you have limited access to ground ,you might be successful with an 'Artificial Ground'
It is a (variable)L ,(variable) C series resonant circuit with a sensitive mA or MicroA meter coupled to a toroid with the toroid sensing the current through the circuit . Connect one end of the circuit with the transceiver ground connection and the other circuit end  to a longest possible wire on the ground (possibly under the carpet )
At the operating frequency adjust L and C for maximum current as shown on the meter.
It is advisable to make the sensitivity of the meter adjustable with a (front-operated)potmeter
MFJ sell such a device . I have made one myself with the variable L being a roller inductor.
The MFJ variable L is stepwise -switchable
Ensure that the ground wire free end is properly insulated because there could be a HIGH RF VOLTAGE.

Frank  , EI7KS