Topics

Just saying "Hello"


MDixon KC9LOO
 

I just want to say Hello and introduce myself to all the members here and ask the first of, I am sure there will be many questions.
  My name is Mike or Michael, either one I will respond to, I am an extra class ham op. who knows absolutely nothing about much of anything.
I have never operated QRP, do not own an HF amp, but my antennas are resonant on many bands and freq. I just use 100 watts from factory radios,
I guess I am more or less an appliance operator, but I do keep my 70,s tube transceiver in operational order.
   I have read many pages here about the uBitx radio and it is very interesting to me. I have one ordered and estimated delivery is March 5th, just the basic kit.
My plan is to get it running smoothly before attempting to do anything else.

 My first question to you, is my aston rs35m power supply OK to use on the uBitx radio, it reads on my VOM as 13.7 volts out? I know this is a trivial question, but have read that many
prefer a 12 volt supply. I do not want to damage this radio with too much voltage right from the start. If my astron is OK, I will use that.

  I am sure to have many, many questions in the future after doing searches here and not exactly understanding some of it. At my age and health, I sometimes think most of my usable
brain cells have left the bulding. HA HA.
I am looking forward to this new path for me, and help and gaining knowledge in this venture.

  Thanks, Mike

 


Bob Lunsford
 

Welcome to the group, Mike,

I use my mfj 28A PS set to 13,.8V with no problem. I also use it with a cigarette lighter plug in the car with no problem.

You will discover that the uBITX V6 has a super good receiver. I use it for listening to AM broadcast with the 75M mobile antenna. Get Chicago AM stations from E KY at nights. The audio quality is excellent, also.

For such a simple radio, you will find it is excellent but a few little add-ons may be interesting, especially an AGC so you are not always using the volume control. Some find this a personal problem but others do not. It is the first and only consideration I had with mine but, on the other hand, many are reluctant to modify the radio for example, my age-related vision keeps me from diving into the radio lest I risk getting into a problem with the modification and regret the temptation for such a small improvement.

If you like CW, the radio will really shine. You can hear 'em all and the low power is all that's needed. My son loves QRP and the portability of the radio plus it has many features that such a radio never has especially for the price.

Good thing that you mentioned antennas. I use a G5RV plus an MFJ OCFD for 40M and up with no problems, whatsoever. The tuning of a 75/80M antenna will be the most problematic as for tuning of the antenna but you can design it for about 100KHz use at some part of the band and be OK. 40M and up, though, the antenna/s will not require such concentration ... just plug in the antenna and go with it. Sure, you can improve it but for ease of operation, 40M and up use gives a lot of peace of mind for me, anyway. A phone net on 75M hears me OK but the power users complain that it is "down in the mud" so I use my 100W rig for that.

The touch-screen is slick...! For the price, it's unbelievably easy to use and makes going to specific frequencies very easy. I have little to no complaints with the radio, as you can see, and use if very often, especially for monitoring the bands. I have hamsticks for 75/40/20 but for general listening, the radio is so sensitive that the 75M antenna is usually left installed and even works outside the ham bands if listening is the most used function for the radio, which it is for me. Your preferences may well be different, though.

I also save all the comments from the group since they are rich with good reference material and suggestions for "fixes" for extraneous problems that some may encounter. Much of the time, such "fixes" are simple to put in place. So many have the radio and it's been around so long that most problems are really not problems at all...

I did do one thing: I left the speaker for the full kit in it's shipping bag and installed it this way with the idea of keeping dust from settling on the speaker cone. Not a problem but the idea makes me feel better about making sure nothing drops into the speaker and develops a rattle.

Bob — KK5R

On Monday, March 1, 2021, 10:22:02 PM EST, MDixon KC9LOO <mdixon1947@...> wrote:


I just want to say Hello and introduce myself to all the members here and ask the first of, I am sure there will be many questions.
  My name is Mike or Michael, either one I will respond to, I am an extra class ham op. who knows absolutely nothing about much of anything.
I have never operated QRP, do not own an HF amp, but my antennas are resonant on many bands and freq. I just use 100 watts from factory radios,
I guess I am more or less an appliance operator, but I do keep my 70,s tube transceiver in operational order.
   I have read many pages here about the uBitx radio and it is very interesting to me. I have one ordered and estimated delivery is March 5th, just the basic kit.
My plan is to get it running smoothly before attempting to do anything else.

 My first question to you, is my aston rs35m power supply OK to use on the uBitx radio, it reads on my VOM as 13.7 volts out? I know this is a trivial question, but have read that many
prefer a 12 volt supply. I do not want to damage this radio with too much voltage right from the start. If my astron is OK, I will use that.

  I am sure to have many, many questions in the future after doing searches here and not exactly understanding some of it. At my age and health, I sometimes think most of my usable
brain cells have left the bulding. HA HA.
I am looking forward to this new path for me, and help and gaining knowledge in this venture.

  Thanks, Mike

 


Kelly Mabry
 

Hi Mike!

Use a 12 v 3a or so supply , as higher voltages and currents can damage the radio. Others can say more about this, but I use a 12v 3a supply

73, 
Kelly KD5AJ 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: MDixon KC9LOO <mdixon1947@...>
Date: 3/1/21 9:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

I just want to say Hello and introduce myself to all the members here and ask the first of, I am sure there will be many questions.
  My name is Mike or Michael, either one I will respond to, I am an extra class ham op. who knows absolutely nothing about much of anything.
I have never operated QRP, do not own an HF amp, but my antennas are resonant on many bands and freq. I just use 100 watts from factory radios,
I guess I am more or less an appliance operator, but I do keep my 70,s tube transceiver in operational order.
   I have read many pages here about the uBitx radio and it is very interesting to me. I have one ordered and estimated delivery is March 5th, just the basic kit.
My plan is to get it running smoothly before attempting to do anything else.

 My first question to you, is my aston rs35m power supply OK to use on the uBitx radio, it reads on my VOM as 13.7 volts out? I know this is a trivial question, but have read that many
prefer a 12 volt supply. I do not want to damage this radio with too much voltage right from the start. If my astron is OK, I will use that.

  I am sure to have many, many questions in the future after doing searches here and not exactly understanding some of it. At my age and health, I sometimes think most of my usable
brain cells have left the bulding. HA HA.
I am looking forward to this new path for me, and help and gaining knowledge in this venture.

  Thanks, Mike

 


Bob Lunsford
 

You can even use eight batteries connected in series. Makes a good emergency/backup radio, too. AA Alkalines should last a long time on receive, too.

I bought two alkaline batteries at Rural King sold for automatic deer feeders for this purpose. Connected in series, they provide 12V and should last several months, depending on how much you transmit of course.

I remember days when a single cell telephone battery powered the filaments of two tubes (1T4/3S4) for more than a year so I recommend keeping this in mind.

Two 6V batteries at Rural King cost only $20 and they are rechargeable 4AH batteries (Yuasa NP4-6) that I will make into a go-box for mountain-topping and emergency purposes. A charger designed for them only costs $12 at the same store.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 10:45:51 AM EST, Kelly Mabry <kmabry2007@...> wrote:


Hi Mike!

Use a 12 v 3a or so supply , as higher voltages and currents can damage the radio. Others can say more about this, but I use a 12v 3a supply

73, 
Kelly KD5AJ 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: MDixon KC9LOO <mdixon1947@...>
Date: 3/1/21 9:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

I just want to say Hello and introduce myself to all the members here and ask the first of, I am sure there will be many questions.
  My name is Mike or Michael, either one I will respond to, I am an extra class ham op. who knows absolutely nothing about much of anything.
I have never operated QRP, do not own an HF amp, but my antennas are resonant on many bands and freq. I just use 100 watts from factory radios,
I guess I am more or less an appliance operator, but I do keep my 70,s tube transceiver in operational order.
   I have read many pages here about the uBitx radio and it is very interesting to me. I have one ordered and estimated delivery is March 5th, just the basic kit.
My plan is to get it running smoothly before attempting to do anything else.

 My first question to you, is my aston rs35m power supply OK to use on the uBitx radio, it reads on my VOM as 13.7 volts out? I know this is a trivial question, but have read that many
prefer a 12 volt supply. I do not want to damage this radio with too much voltage right from the start. If my astron is OK, I will use that.

  I am sure to have many, many questions in the future after doing searches here and not exactly understanding some of it. At my age and health, I sometimes think most of my usable
brain cells have left the bulding. HA HA.
I am looking forward to this new path for me, and help and gaining knowledge in this venture.

  Thanks, Mike

 


Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/1/21 10:21 PM, MDixon KC9LOO wrote:

I just want to say Hello and introduce myself to all the members here and ask the first of, I am sure there will be many questions.
  My name is Mike or Michael, either one I will respond to, I am an extra class ham op. who knows absolutely nothing about much of anything.
I have never operated QRP, do not own an HF amp, but my antennas are resonant on many bands and freq. I just use 100 watts from factory radios,
I guess I am more or less an appliance operator, but I do keep my 70,s tube transceiver in operational order.
   I have read many pages here about the uBitx radio and it is very interesting to me. I have one ordered and estimated delivery is March 5th, just the basic kit.
My plan is to get it running smoothly before attempting to do anything else.

 My first question to you, is my aston rs35m power supply OK to use on the uBitx radio, it reads on my VOM as 13.7 volts out? I know this is a trivial question, but have read that many
prefer a 12 volt supply. I do not want to damage this radio with too much voltage right from the start. If my astron is OK, I will use that.

  I am sure to have many, many questions in the future after doing searches here and not exactly understanding some of it. At my age and health, I sometimes think most of my usable
brain cells have left the bulding. HA HA.
I am looking forward to this new path for me, and help and gaining knowledge in this venture.

  Thanks, Mike


Bob Lunsford
 

Full terminal voltage of the two batteries FULL CHARGED is 6.45V. Connected in series is about 13V. That's no-load terminal voltage. ANY load at all will tend to pull down the terminal voltage,

The charge system in a car is usually set at 13.8-14.2V but this does not mean that the batteries hold that charge voltage. The charge voltage is set this way so the voltage drop in the cabling does not affect the battery charge voltage. This is from experience working on cars for decades and professionally for several years.

The "memory" that nicad batteries assume is avoided by not charging them to full voltage, by the way.

The terminal voltage at the cigarette lighter outlet on my Ford Escape is 12.4V, according to the display on my G90 when plugged into the lighter socket.

I remember several uBITX users in the past saying they ran their radios at 14V. I have my PS set to 13.6V. I have yet to hear from someone here that their radio was affected or ruined by running them at higher voltages. I would not knowingly run mine at 14V, though, just to be able to say that my radio did not fail due to this. I welcome anyone here to tell me that their radio smoked by running it at voltages at the 13.8V magic number or any specific voltage above 12V.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 12:46:46 PM EST, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:


Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course,
that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems
such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little
more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power
sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those
"12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for
those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of
those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as
much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned)
are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven
volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery
technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal
voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher.
And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power
output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more
than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So
falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in
results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/1/21 10:21 PM, MDixon KC9LOO wrote:

> I just want to say Hello and introduce myself to all the members here
> and ask the first of, I am sure there will be many questions.
>   My name is Mike or Michael, either one I will respond to, I am an
> extra class ham op. who knows absolutely nothing about much of anything.
> I have never operated QRP, do not own an HF amp, but my antennas are
> resonant on many bands and freq. I just use 100 watts from factory radios,
> I guess I am more or less an appliance operator, but I do keep my 70,s
> tube transceiver in operational order.
>    I have read many pages here about the uBitx radio and it is very
> interesting to me. I have one ordered and estimated delivery is March
> 5th, just the basic kit.
> My plan is to get it running smoothly before attempting to do anything
> else.
>
>  My first question to you, is my aston rs35m power supply OK to use on
> the uBitx radio, it reads on my VOM as 13.7 volts out? I know this is
> a trivial question, but have read that many
> prefer a 12 volt supply. I do not want to damage this radio with too
> much voltage right from the start. If my astron is OK, I will use that.
>
>   I am sure to have many, many questions in the future after doing
> searches here and not exactly understanding some of it. At my age and
> health, I sometimes think most of my usable
> brain cells have left the bulding. HA HA.
> I am looking forward to this new path for me, and help and gaining
> knowledge in this venture.
>
>   Thanks, Mike
>






Jerry Gaffke
 

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Bill Cromwell
 

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Bob Lunsford
 

A lead-acid battery cell voltage is 2.2V

I charged the batteries I have and measured them. Real life check, surpasses high theory. +/- 6.43V if I remember correctly.

You must be talking about another type of cell. Lithium? Out of my ballpark.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 5:19:21 PM EST, Shirley Dulcey KE1L <mark@...> wrote:


That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Arv Evans
 

Might be able to use the charge/discharge charts for 18650 cells
and only charge your cells to 13.6 volts.  Could also insert two
power diodes in series with the 14.8V and have 13.6V for the
radio.

Arv
_._


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 3:19 PM Shirley Dulcey KE1L <mark@...> wrote:
That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Bob Lunsford
 

Want a cheap and dirty way to reduce the 14.8V...? Put diode/s in series with the battery lead. Each power diode is 0.6V drop across the junction so two of them would drop the voltage by1.2V or 14.8 - 1.2 = 13.6V ... simple.

Just make sure the diode/s can pass the current and that the polarity is right.

I did this to drop 13.8V to 8V for a keyer, once. Worked fine.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 2:53:53 PM EST, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:


Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Bob Lunsford
 

GMTA {;->>>

On Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 5:32:18 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Might be able to use the charge/discharge charts for 18650 cells
and only charge your cells to 13.6 volts.  Could also insert two
power diodes in series with the 14.8V and have 13.6V for the
radio.

Arv
_._


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 3:19 PM Shirley Dulcey KE1L <mark@...> wrote:
That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Bill Cromwell
 

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:
That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:
Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:
Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


vk4amg@...
 

Folks,

 

A data sheet is usually a good start to avoid the “fake news”. This data extracted from https://www.eemb.com/.

 

Ambient Temperature:25±5; Relative Huimdity:65±20%

 

Nominal Voltage 3.7V  per cell

 

Standard Charge Constant Current and Constant Voltage (CC/CV)

Current = 0.52A               Final charge voltage = 4.2V Final charge Current = 0.052A

Standard Discharge Constant Current (CC)

 Current = 0.52A               End Voltage = 3.0V

 

 

A protection board is essential to avoid damage to the batteries and avoid fire.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2S-to-6S-3-30A-PCB-BMS-Protection-Board-For-Li-ion-Lithium-Battery-Charger/264324723268?hash=item3d8afb3244:g:~OgAAOSwH3Zc3SyG&frcectupt=true

 

3S 8A 12.6V
Size: 50mm x 16mm x 3.5mm (L x W x H)
Supported Battery type: three cell 4.2V Lithium ion battery
Overcharged Voltage protection: 4.35V
Over discharged Voltage protection: 2.7V
Maximum Continuous Current: 8A
Maximum Peak Current: 15A, <20ms
Internal resistance: <8mΩ
Operating temperature: -20 to 70°C

 

This board may also be used as a charger for a constant current power supply providing

Current (A) = Capacity of each cell (AHr) / (4 Hours)

 

However, an external purpose built lithium ion charge is recommended.

 

 

 

The maximum terminal voltage of 3 cells in series is 16.8 V. Two diodes will not keep the supply to the radio to under 13.8V.  Also at a minimum voltage of 11.0V, only about half of the capacity of the battery will be used.

 

A low dropout regulator such as a LM1085IT-12 12V 3A Low Voltage Dropout Regulator. Again full battery capacity will not be available.

 

As a switching regulator 3A Mini DC-DC step down converter volt regulator 5V-23V to 3.3V 6V 9V 12V JCSE (https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3A-Mini-DC-DC-step-down-converter-volt-regulator-5V-23V-to-3-3V-6V-9V-12V-JCSE/143474017515?hash=item2167b7c4eb:g:hhkAAOSwvytcJeUX&frcectupt=true)  or 5A Mini DC-DC Buck Step Down Converter Volt Regulator 4-38V to 3.3V 12V 24V Hot https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5A-Mini-DC-DC-Buck-Step-Down-Converter-Volt-Regulator-4-38V-to-3-3V-12V-24V-Hot/143038990104?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D231204%26meid%3D7a31a5648cbd43c0971c63cb5b586154%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D143474017515%26itm%3D143038990104%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109 is likely to cause radio interference if fitted inside the radio, the battery, charger, protection board, and the regulator should be installed in metal shielded enclosure. Leads into and out of the box should  be fitted with EMI filters (at least a 1nF bypass capacitor and ferrite bead (inside box)).

 

This solution allows the full capacity of the cells to be available. Extended capacity may be achieved by using 4 cells in series (with the appropriate charger / protection board.

 

Lithium polymer batteries as used in remote control planes and cars may also be used. Charging and protection settings must then be for lithium polymer not lithium ion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

73

 

George

                VK4AMG

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Cromwell
Sent: Wednesday, 3 March 2021 9:16 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

 

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

 

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


vk4amg@...
 

Folks,

 

A data sheet is usually a good start to avoid the “fake news”. This data extracted from https://www.eemb.com/.

 

Ambient Temperature:25±5; Relative Huimdity:65±20%

 

Nominal Voltage 3.7V  per cell

 

Standard Charge Constant Current and Constant Voltage (CC/CV)

Current = 0.52A               Final charge voltage = 4.2V Final charge Current = 0.052A

Standard Discharge Constant Current (CC)

 Current = 0.52A               End Voltage = 3.0V

 

 

A protection board is essential to avoid damage to the batteries and avoid fire.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2S-to-6S-3-30A-PCB-BMS-Protection-Board-For-Li-ion-Lithium-Battery-Charger/264324723268?hash=item3d8afb3244:g:~OgAAOSwH3Zc3SyG&frcectupt=true

 

3S 8A 12.6V
Size: 50mm x 16mm x 3.5mm (L x W x H)
Supported Battery type: three cell 4.2V Lithium ion battery
Overcharged Voltage protection: 4.35V
Over discharged Voltage protection: 2.7V
Maximum Continuous Current: 8A
Maximum Peak Current: 15A, <20ms
Internal resistance: <8mΩ
Operating temperature: -20 to 70°C

 

This board may also be used as a charger for a constant current power supply providing

Current (A) = Capacity of each cell (AHr) / (4 Hours)

 

However, an external purpose built lithium ion charge is recommended.

 

 

 

The maximum terminal voltage of 3 cells in series is 16.8 V. Two diodes will not keep the supply to the radio to under 13.8V.  Also at a minimum voltage of 11.0V, only about half of the capacity of the battery will be used.

 

A low dropout regulator such as a LM1085IT-12 12V 3A Low Voltage Dropout Regulator. Again full battery capacity will not be available.

 

As a switching regulator 3A Mini DC-DC step down converter volt regulator 5V-23V to 3.3V 6V 9V 12V JCSE (https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3A-Mini-DC-DC-step-down-converter-volt-regulator-5V-23V-to-3-3V-6V-9V-12V-JCSE/143474017515?hash=item2167b7c4eb:g:hhkAAOSwvytcJeUX&frcectupt=true)  or 5A Mini DC-DC Buck Step Down Converter Volt Regulator 4-38V to 3.3V 12V 24V Hot https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5A-Mini-DC-DC-Buck-Step-Down-Converter-Volt-Regulator-4-38V-to-3-3V-12V-24V-Hot/143038990104?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D231204%26meid%3D7a31a5648cbd43c0971c63cb5b586154%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D143474017515%26itm%3D143038990104%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109 is likely to cause radio interference if fitted inside the radio, the battery, charger, protection board, and the regulator should be installed in metal shielded enclosure. Leads into and out of the box should  be fitted with EMI filters (at least a 1nF bypass capacitor and ferrite bead (inside box)).

 

This solution allows the full capacity of the cells to be available. Extended capacity may be achieved by using 4 cells in series (with the appropriate charger / protection board.

 

Lithium polymer batteries as used in remote control planes and cars may also be used. Charging and protection settings must then be for lithium polymer not lithium ion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

73

 

George

                VK4AMG

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Cromwell
Sent: Wednesday, 3 March 2021 9:16 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

 

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

 

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


f.ketterman@...
 

What about using 14430 LiFePO4 outdoor solar light batteries?  They are 3.2v each so with 4 you would get 12.8v nominal.  And they are available on Amazon.com in bulk quantities with or without charger.  Just an idea.

 

Frank Ketterman

f.ketterman@...

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of vk4amg@...
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 18:50
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

 

Folks,

 

A data sheet is usually a good start to avoid the “fake news”. This data extracted from https://www.eemb.com/.

 

Ambient Temperature:25±5; Relative Huimdity:65±20%

 

Nominal Voltage 3.7V  per cell

 

Standard Charge Constant Current and Constant Voltage (CC/CV)

Current = 0.52A               Final charge voltage = 4.2V Final charge Current = 0.052A

Standard Discharge Constant Current (CC)

 Current = 0.52A               End Voltage = 3.0V

 

 

A protection board is essential to avoid damage to the batteries and avoid fire.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2S-to-6S-3-30A-PCB-BMS-Protection-Board-For-Li-ion-Lithium-Battery-Charger/264324723268?hash=item3d8afb3244:g:~OgAAOSwH3Zc3SyG&frcectupt=true

 

3S 8A 12.6V
Size: 50mm x 16mm x 3.5mm (L x W x H)
Supported Battery type: three cell 4.2V Lithium ion battery
Overcharged Voltage protection: 4.35V
Over discharged Voltage protection: 2.7V
Maximum Continuous Current: 8A
Maximum Peak Current: 15A, <20ms
Internal resistance: <8mΩ
Operating temperature: -20 to 70°C

 

This board may also be used as a charger for a constant current power supply providing

Current (A) = Capacity of each cell (AHr) / (4 Hours)

 

However, an external purpose built lithium ion charge is recommended.

 

 

 

The maximum terminal voltage of 3 cells in series is 16.8 V. Two diodes will not keep the supply to the radio to under 13.8V.  Also at a minimum voltage of 11.0V, only about half of the capacity of the battery will be used.

 

A low dropout regulator such as a LM1085IT-12 12V 3A Low Voltage Dropout Regulator. Again full battery capacity will not be available.

 

As a switching regulator 3A Mini DC-DC step down converter volt regulator 5V-23V to 3.3V 6V 9V 12V JCSE (https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3A-Mini-DC-DC-step-down-converter-volt-regulator-5V-23V-to-3-3V-6V-9V-12V-JCSE/143474017515?hash=item2167b7c4eb:g:hhkAAOSwvytcJeUX&frcectupt=true)  or 5A Mini DC-DC Buck Step Down Converter Volt Regulator 4-38V to 3.3V 12V 24V Hot https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5A-Mini-DC-DC-Buck-Step-Down-Converter-Volt-Regulator-4-38V-to-3-3V-12V-24V-Hot/143038990104?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D231204%26meid%3D7a31a5648cbd43c0971c63cb5b586154%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D143474017515%26itm%3D143038990104%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109 is likely to cause radio interference if fitted inside the radio, the battery, charger, protection board, and the regulator should be installed in metal shielded enclosure. Leads into and out of the box should  be fitted with EMI filters (at least a 1nF bypass capacitor and ferrite bead (inside box)).

 

This solution allows the full capacity of the cells to be available. Extended capacity may be achieved by using 4 cells in series (with the appropriate charger / protection board.

 

Lithium polymer batteries as used in remote control planes and cars may also be used. Charging and protection settings must then be for lithium polymer not lithium ion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

73

 

George

                VK4AMG

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Cromwell
Sent: Wednesday, 3 March 2021 9:16 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

 

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

 

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Jerry Gaffke
 

The IRF510's would be quite happy with 16.8v, and would operate with less distortion for the same power out
than they do at 12v.  But you would need a 12v regulator such as the LM2940T-12 on the main uBitx board
as I previously suggested.

If you can get a buck mode switcher that operates cleanly enough, use that instead of an LM7805 on the Raduino
to improve battery life.    Lots of power being lost in the LM7805.   Hook the switcher up directly to the battery.

A fully discharged Li-Ion battery is down around 3.0 volts.
The uBitx would do fine with three cells when they are fully charged,
but close the 9 volts when approaching a discharged state may not be sufficient.
If planning to transmit for more than a few minutes, I would not go with anything smaller than
the 2 or 3 amp-hours that the 18650 cells have to offer.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 07:05 PM, <f.ketterman@...> wrote:

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

 

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


vk4amg@...
 

Jerry,

 

Just in-case you didn’t see this………………..

 

Folks,

 

A data sheet is usually a good start to avoid the “fake news”. This data extracted from https://www.eemb.com/.

 

Ambient Temperature:25±5; Relative Huimdity:65±20%

 

Nominal Voltage 3.7V  per cell

 

Standard Charge Constant Current and Constant Voltage (CC/CV)

Current = 0.52A               Final charge voltage = 4.2V Final charge Current = 0.052A

Standard Discharge Constant Current (CC)

 Current = 0.52A               End Voltage = 3.0V

 

 

A protection board is essential to avoid damage to the batteries and avoid fire.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2S-to-6S-3-30A-PCB-BMS-Protection-Board-For-Li-ion-Lithium-Battery-Charger/264324723268?hash=item3d8afb3244:g:~OgAAOSwH3Zc3SyG&frcectupt=true

 

3S 8A 12.6V
Size: 50mm x 16mm x 3.5mm (L x W x H)
Supported Battery type: three cell 4.2V Lithium ion battery
Overcharged Voltage protection: 4.35V
Over discharged Voltage protection: 2.7V
Maximum Continuous Current: 8A
Maximum Peak Current: 15A, <20ms
Internal resistance: <8mΩ
Operating temperature: -20 to 70°C

 

This board may also be used as a charger for a constant current power supply providing

Current (A) = Capacity of each cell (AHr) / (4 Hours)

 

However, an external purpose built lithium ion charge is recommended.

 

 

 

The maximum terminal voltage of 3 cells in series is 16.8 V. Two diodes will not keep the supply to the radio to under 13.8V.  Also at a minimum voltage of 11.0V, only about half of the capacity of the battery will be used.

 

A low dropout regulator such as a LM1085IT-12 12V 3A Low Voltage Dropout Regulator. Again full battery capacity will not be available.

 

As a switching regulator 3A Mini DC-DC step down converter volt regulator 5V-23V to 3.3V 6V 9V 12V JCSE (https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3A-Mini-DC-DC-step-down-converter-volt-regulator-5V-23V-to-3-3V-6V-9V-12V-JCSE/143474017515?hash=item2167b7c4eb:g:hhkAAOSwvytcJeUX&frcectupt=true)  or 5A Mini DC-DC Buck Step Down Converter Volt Regulator 4-38V to 3.3V 12V 24V Hot https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5A-Mini-DC-DC-Buck-Step-Down-Converter-Volt-Regulator-4-38V-to-3-3V-12V-24V-Hot/143038990104?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D231204%26meid%3D7a31a5648cbd43c0971c63cb5b586154%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D143474017515%26itm%3D143038990104%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109 is likely to cause radio interference if fitted inside the radio, the battery, charger, protection board, and the regulator should be installed in metal shielded enclosure. Leads into and out of the box should  be fitted with EMI filters (at least a 1nF bypass capacitor and ferrite bead (inside box)).

 

This solution allows the full capacity of the cells to be available. Extended capacity may be achieved by using 4 cells in series (with the appropriate charger / protection board.

 

Lithium polymer batteries as used in remote control planes and cars may also be used. Charging and protection settings must then be for lithium polymer not lithium ion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

73

 

George

                VK4AMG

 

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry Gaffke via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, 3 March 2021 2:28 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

 

The IRF510's would be quite happy with 16.8v, and would operate with less distortion for the same power out
than they do at 12v.  But you would need a 12v regulator such as the LM2940T-12 on the main uBitx board
as I previously suggested.

If you can get a buck mode switcher that operates cleanly enough, use that instead of an LM7805 on the Raduino
to improve battery life.    Lots of power being lost in the LM7805.   Hook the switcher up directly to the battery.

A fully discharged Li-Ion battery is down around 3.0 volts.
The uBitx would do fine with three cells when they are fully charged,
but close the 9 volts when approaching a discharged state may not be sufficient.
If planning to transmit for more than a few minutes, I would not go with anything smaller than
the 2 or 3 amp-hours that the 18650 cells have to offer.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 07:05 PM, <f.ketterman@...> wrote:

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

 

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H


Richard DeMartini
 

I plan to do something similar but I bought a 2000mAh NiMh battery as they are a little less temperamental than LiPo and Tenergy is a known brand. I also bought the Tenergy charger that I will plug into the main 12vdc input to charge. I have an Inkits case that has a toggle for the battery and a 3-position rocker for the main that disconnects the input and battery to main to allow only 12vdc to the battery when charging. I also bought a hammond metal box to put the Buck converters in (1 for 12vdc main to the board and 1 to the 5" Nextion screen) and to put the LC filters in. I also plan to add a second fuse so I can run 12v-2A to the PA PWR pin and 12v-0.5A to the +12v pin on the board.
I will filter after the Buck converter then out of the Hammond box to the two fuses then to the board pins. I think this will work. I welcome comments and warnings. The 12vdc battery puts out 13.4vdc when fully charged. 

Rick


Sent from Outlook



From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of vk4amg@... <vk4amg@...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 4:34 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"
 

Jerry,

 

Just in-case you didn’t see this………………..

 

Folks,

 

A data sheet is usually a good start to avoid the “fake news”. This data extracted from https://www.eemb.com/.

 

Ambient Temperature:25±5; Relative Huimdity:65±20%

 

Nominal Voltage 3.7V  per cell

 

Standard Charge Constant Current and Constant Voltage (CC/CV)

Current = 0.52A               Final charge voltage = 4.2V Final charge Current = 0.052A

Standard Discharge Constant Current (CC)

 Current = 0.52A               End Voltage = 3.0V

 

 

A protection board is essential to avoid damage to the batteries and avoid fire.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/2S-to-6S-3-30A-PCB-BMS-Protection-Board-For-Li-ion-Lithium-Battery-Charger/264324723268?hash=item3d8afb3244:g:~OgAAOSwH3Zc3SyG&frcectupt=true

 

3S 8A 12.6V
Size: 50mm x 16mm x 3.5mm (L x W x H)
Supported Battery type: three cell 4.2V Lithium ion battery
Overcharged Voltage protection: 4.35V
Over discharged Voltage protection: 2.7V
Maximum Continuous Current: 8A
Maximum Peak Current: 15A, <20ms
Internal resistance: <8mΩ
Operating temperature: -20 to 70°C

 

This board may also be used as a charger for a constant current power supply providing

Current (A) = Capacity of each cell (AHr) / (4 Hours)

 

However, an external purpose built lithium ion charge is recommended.

 

 

 

The maximum terminal voltage of 3 cells in series is 16.8 V. Two diodes will not keep the supply to the radio to under 13.8V.  Also at a minimum voltage of 11.0V, only about half of the capacity of the battery will be used.

 

A low dropout regulator such as a LM1085IT-12 12V 3A Low Voltage Dropout Regulator. Again full battery capacity will not be available.

 

As a switching regulator 3A Mini DC-DC step down converter volt regulator 5V-23V to 3.3V 6V 9V 12V JCSE (https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3A-Mini-DC-DC-step-down-converter-volt-regulator-5V-23V-to-3-3V-6V-9V-12V-JCSE/143474017515?hash=item2167b7c4eb:g:hhkAAOSwvytcJeUX&frcectupt=true)  or 5A Mini DC-DC Buck Step Down Converter Volt Regulator 4-38V to 3.3V 12V 24V Hot https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5A-Mini-DC-DC-Buck-Step-Down-Converter-Volt-Regulator-4-38V-to-3-3V-12V-24V-Hot/143038990104?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D231204%26meid%3D7a31a5648cbd43c0971c63cb5b586154%26pid%3D100010%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D143474017515%26itm%3D143038990104%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109 is likely to cause radio interference if fitted inside the radio, the battery, charger, protection board, and the regulator should be installed in metal shielded enclosure. Leads into and out of the box should  be fitted with EMI filters (at least a 1nF bypass capacitor and ferrite bead (inside box)).

 

This solution allows the full capacity of the cells to be available. Extended capacity may be achieved by using 4 cells in series (with the appropriate charger / protection board.

 

Lithium polymer batteries as used in remote control planes and cars may also be used. Charging and protection settings must then be for lithium polymer not lithium ion.

 

Hope this helps.

 

73

 

George

                VK4AMG

 

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry Gaffke via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, 3 March 2021 2:28 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Just saying "Hello"

 

The IRF510's would be quite happy with 16.8v, and would operate with less distortion for the same power out
than they do at 12v.  But you would need a 12v regulator such as the LM2940T-12 on the main uBitx board
as I previously suggested.

If you can get a buck mode switcher that operates cleanly enough, use that instead of an LM7805 on the Raduino
to improve battery life.    Lots of power being lost in the LM7805.   Hook the switcher up directly to the battery.

A fully discharged Li-Ion battery is down around 3.0 volts.
The uBitx would do fine with three cells when they are fully charged,
but close the 9 volts when approaching a discharged state may not be sufficient.
If planning to transmit for more than a few minutes, I would not go with anything smaller than
the 2 or 3 amp-hours that the 18650 cells have to offer.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 07:05 PM, <f.ketterman@...> wrote:

Thank you Shirley,

I thought I had heard about higher, full charge terminal voltages for those. The tables i looked at say 3.7 volts and nothing about that 4.2 volts. So using three of those cells starts me off at about 12.6 volts and soon comes down to around 11 volts. All of that is satisfactory to me and no power wasted in diodes or other regulators. The small reduction in RF power out is inconsequential:)

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 5:18 PM, Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

That four cell battery would deliver 16.8V at full charge, which is much too high for a lot of ham gear. After you use up the first 10% of your battery's capacity it will drop to around 14.8V, which is usually safe for equipment since it will drop a bit more when you transmit.

 

On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 2:53 PM Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, four of the 18650 cells in series comes out to 14.8 volts. I have been considering using three of those in series for around about 11 volts (+/- a few millivolts). The radio will put out slightly less RF power but not enough to matter in the real world. When a "12 volt" battery gets down to 11 volts it is almost 'dead'. The 11 volts from the lithium pack can go for a long time. I am preparing to change to lithium technology because of the greater power density. When I do, I expect to operate my "12 volt" radios on "11 volts". I will defy anybody to see the difference in output power at the receiving end from 11 volts to 14 volts.

73,

Bill  KU8H

On 3/2/21 2:19 PM, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io wrote:

Mike,

You apparently have this thing:
    https://www.astroncorp.com/linear-desktop-w-meters
    https://usermanual.wiki/Pdf/ASTRONRS35mPowerSupplySchema.237106077

Looks like a very nice 25 lb linear supply.
And very quiet, suitable for a receiver.

That first link says "Internally Adjustable Voltage (11-15VDC)"
So you could remove the cover and back it off from 13.7 volts  to be a bit safer.

I would not press equipment such as the uBitx much beyond the maximum specified voltage.
Unless, like Bill, I was prepared to replace the entire uBitx when it turns into a smoking cinder.
There have not been any reports of the v6 being destroyed by 13.7vdc, but nothing on hfsignals.com
says it is good beyond 12.0 volts.  Previous versions of the uBitx (and the Bitx40) have had parts
running hotter than spec'd at 13.7 volts, with occasional failures.

Here's some old thoughts on power supplies.
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/84377
I think fusing your supply at 3 Amps, adding an LM2940CT-12 regulator for the main uBitx board,
and powering the IRF510 drains directly from a 3 amp fused power supply is ideal.
Four Li-Ion 18650 cells plus that LM2940CT-12 would be great for uBitx portable use.

Opinions vary. 
Have fun coming to your own opinions,
the uBitx provides a great way to learn about radios.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Mar 2, 2021 at 09:46 AM, Bill Cromwell wrote:

Hi Mike,

Welcome. I think the RS35 indicates a 35 amp power supply. Of course, that only means it can supply "up to" 35 amps. Nominal 12 volt systems such as your "12 volt" car run as much as 14 volts (sometimes a little more). "12 volt" equipment is mostly safe to operate on such power sources. A few manufacturers sell equipment that won't tolerate those "12 volt" sources. They clearly specify that. They really intend for those to operated on lower voltages. I *never* consider buying any of those. As for my early V3 uBitX, I always run it from supplies up to as much as 14 volts. It is perfectly happy with that.

The pair of six volt batteries at the farm store (somebody mentioned) are lead-acid batteries as well and at full charge are closer to seven volts each. Oh my gosh! tell me isn't so! Be careful about other battery technology like lithium and pay attention to the full charge terminal voltage of those battery packs. Some of them are substantially higher. And note that our radios will operate from lower voltages with power output a little lower. We have to reduce RF power output by well more than half to lose a single S-meter point at a distant receiver. So falling from 10 Watts to 6 or 7 watts makes absolutely no difference in results. Have fun with your new radio:)

73,

Bill  KU8H