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Got a fan mounted #v6

Zac T
 

So I was able to take an old 12v case fan and mount it to the back of the uBitX case.  After flipping some wires around on the connector I was able to plug into PWR_FLAG and run the fan.  Only problem I had was I found out after mounting the fan there is a bearing that needs some time to warm up.  Until then it is loud but after a bit, it runs fine.  Probably only added .1 amp draw from the source.  I need to expand out the vents in the back but it is defiantly pulling air though the case and away from the heat sinks on the finals. 

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi,

A drop of light oil on the spindle helps those fans along. Look for sewing machine oil or "3-in-1" brand. That can make a fan that won't run at all run again. There may be a label glued over the spindle bearing end. Peel it back or off. Apply a drop of oil and spin the fan with your finger. Press the label back on to help keep out dirt. Plug it back in.

73,

Bill KU8H

bark less - wag more

On 6/10/20 7:34 PM, Zac T wrote:
So I was able to take an old 12v case fan and mount it to the back of the uBitX case.  After flipping some wires around on the connector I was able to plug into PWR_FLAG and run the fan.  Only problem I had was I found out after mounting the fan there is a bearing that needs some time to warm up.  Until then it is loud but after a bit, it runs fine. Probably only added .1 amp draw from the source.  I need to expand out the vents in the back but it is defiantly pulling air though the case and away from the heat sinks on the finals.

Zac T
 

I'll try it, thank you for the tip.

Bob Lunsford
 

I also found a drop of WD-40 works fine for fans and also to clean noisy contacts and pots. I may spray a very quick shot into a pot but for contacts and bearings, I spray a small quantity into a paint can lid and use a Q-Tip of a toothpick to transfer the oil.

I also have used 3-in-1 oil and it works fine but that was eons ago. After WD-40 came along, it's what I prefer. Everyone to his own, though. If someone prefers Doxit (sp?), fine

Bob — KK5R

On Wednesday, June 10, 2020, 7:42:57 PM EDT, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:


Hi,

A drop of light oil on the spindle helps those fans along. Look for
sewing machine oil or "3-in-1" brand. That can make a fan that won't run
at all run again. There may be a label glued over the spindle bearing
end. Peel it back or off. Apply a drop of oil and spin the fan with your
finger. Press the label back on to help keep out dirt. Plug it back in.

73,

Bill  KU8H

bark less - wag more

On 6/10/20 7:34 PM, Zac T wrote:
> So I was able to take an old 12v case fan and mount it to the back of
> the uBitX case.  After flipping some wires around on the connector I was
> able to plug into PWR_FLAG and run the fan.  Only problem I had was I
> found out after mounting the fan there is a bearing that needs some time
> to warm up.  Until then it is loud but after a bit, it runs fine. 
> Probably only added .1 amp draw from the source.  I need to expand out
> the vents in the back but it is defiantly pulling air though the case
> and away from the heat sinks on the finals.
>



 

Or half a drop (or less),

A full drop is too much for computer fan bearings and will add noise.  You just need enough to wet the spindle and not make a puddle.  At least in my experience that's what I've found.

If you spray some WD-40 in a container and let the solvent evaporate, all you are left with is a very viscous oil type compound (thicker than gear oil).  I found this out at work where I was keeping some in a small glass bottle.  It's good for long term water repelling (like for door locks etc), but not so good for fan or electric motor bearings where you generally want a light oil.  Should be good for pot shafts and things like that though as mentioned above.

73.

Bob Lunsford
 

WD-40 is composed of some lubricant  and bees' wax. After I spray some in an old paint can lid and use a tooth pick to deposit it, I usually use a #1 Philips head screwdriver, the little bit of WD-40 is discarded. I don't want it laying around waiting for Murphy to upset it and leave a puddle on the workbench. An I use it for stopping noisy pots on the wiper that contacts the paper saturated with carbon. It's to kill the electrical noise, not to lub the shaft.

Sorry I did not make that very clear.

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 12:02:04 AM EDT, Mark - N7EKU <n7eku@...> wrote:


Or half a drop (or less),

A full drop is too much for computer fan bearings and will add noise.  You just need enough to wet the spindle and not make a puddle.  At least in my experience that's what I've found.

If you spray some WD-40 in a container and let the solvent evaporate, all you are left with is a very viscous oil type compound (thicker than gear oil).  I found this out at work where I was keeping some in a small glass bottle.  It's good for long term water repelling (like for door locks etc), but not so good for fan or electric motor bearings where you generally want a light oil.  Should be good for pot shafts and things like that though as mentioned above.

73.

Bob Lunsford
 

As cheap as those little fans are concerned, I never-ever lubed a fan bearing. I have lubricated Oilite bearings in larger motors like in window fans, though. I must have collected a dozen of the little fans, though, and these are used where needed. Depending on the fan design, I usually put a resistor in series with them to slow them down and cause less possible noise in the shack. Not all fans will allow you to do this, however. Just like not all LED lights can be electrically dimmed.

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 12:02:04 AM EDT, Mark - N7EKU <n7eku@...> wrote:


Or half a drop (or less),

A full drop is too much for computer fan bearings and will add noise.  You just need enough to wet the spindle and not make a puddle.  At least in my experience that's what I've found.

If you spray some WD-40 in a container and let the solvent evaporate, all you are left with is a very viscous oil type compound (thicker than gear oil).  I found this out at work where I was keeping some in a small glass bottle.  It's good for long term water repelling (like for door locks etc), but not so good for fan or electric motor bearings where you generally want a light oil.  Should be good for pot shafts and things like that though as mentioned above.

73.

Todd Carney
 

An aerospace electronics company I worked for in the 1970s banned WD-40 from the plant. No one was allowed to even have it in their possession, including the maintenance crew. This was on the orders of the chief production engineer (my father) and the quality-control manager. 

People would use the stuff on fine bearings and on sensitive mechanical instruments. When all the volatiles evaporated, it left a sticky mess that attracted dust and gummed up the instruments. It simply was not intended as a lubricant, though that is probably its most common (mis)use. To this day, I can't even stand the smell of it.

Todd K7TFC

 

WD-40 is meant to loosen rusty nuts and such. I heard it contains fish oil.

I use silicone oil for lubricating such things. I used to get many FT757 with tuning shaft jammed.. I used to clean with isoprophyl alcohol
and remove the gunk and then put a drop of silicone oil.

Raj

At 11/06/2020, you wrote:
An aerospace electronics company I worked for in the 1970s banned WD-40 from the plant. No one was allowed to even have it in their possession, including the maintenance crew. This was on the orders of the chief production engineer (my father) and the quality-control manager.Â

People would use the stuff on fine bearings and on sensitive mechanical instruments. When all the volatiles evaporated, it left a sticky mess that attracted dust and gummed up the instruments. It simply was not intended as a lubricant, though that is probably its most common (mis)use. To this day, I can't even stand the smell of it.

Todd K7TFC

Patrick Ridge
 

Hello

To oil those little bronze bearings present in most electric motors, use a light machine oil like 3-n-1 oil or anything similar, like sewing machine oil.

FYI; WD-40 gets a lot of undeserved press. It is not intended to loosen stuck bolts, but often works because it's the only thing on hand. Same goes for lubricating hinges, bolts and the like. WD-40 does not contain bees' wax or fish oil. WD-40 keeps their recipe secret, but it has been analysed. One of the main components is Stoddard solvent, which is a fancy way of saying mineral spirits and explains why WD-40 can remove labels and adhesive tape residue, One of the other main components is mineral oil and the remaining components are several types of alkanes that have lubricating properties. The solvent part of WD-40 will evaporate and displace water, leaving behind the mineral oil and alkanes to lubricate and protect. 

It doesn't work as well as penetrating oil for freeing stuck bolts and pales in comparison to light machine oil as a lubricant. But, I think everyone has a can of it around and being present counts for more than a lot. 

I don't have a uBitx yet, but it on the agenda to be ordered in a few weeks. I've just been reading the site and emails as they come in now. The ink is still drying on my amateur license, I do have a fair amount to learn and I was hoping that getting a uBitx will help my curve.

Alan
AE0IX

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 12:47:33 AM MDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


As cheap as those little fans are concerned, I never-ever lubed a fan bearing. I have lubricated Oilite bearings in larger motors like in window fans, though. I must have collected a dozen of the little fans, though, and these are used where needed. Depending on the fan design, I usually put a resistor in series with them to slow them down and cause less possible noise in the shack. Not all fans will allow you to do this, however. Just like not all LED lights can be electrically dimmed.

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 12:02:04 AM EDT, Mark - N7EKU <n7eku@...> wrote:


Or half a drop (or less),

A full drop is too much for computer fan bearings and will add noise.  You just need enough to wet the spindle and not make a puddle.  At least in my experience that's what I've found.

If you spray some WD-40 in a container and let the solvent evaporate, all you are left with is a very viscous oil type compound (thicker than gear oil).  I found this out at work where I was keeping some in a small glass bottle.  It's good for long term water repelling (like for door locks etc), but not so good for fan or electric motor bearings where you generally want a light oil.  Should be good for pot shafts and things like that though as mentioned above.

73.

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Alan,

Welcome to amateur radio. The V6 has evolved some of the issues that have been tamed in earlier models. I hope you enjoy yours.

73,

Bill KU8H

bark less - wag more

On 6/11/20 5:34 PM, Patrick Ridge via groups.io wrote:
Hello
To oil those little bronze bearings present in most electric motors, use a light machine oil like 3-n-1 oil or anything similar, like sewing machine oil.
FYI; WD-40 gets a lot of undeserved press. It is not intended to loosen stuck bolts, but often works because it's the only thing on hand. Same goes for lubricating hinges, bolts and the like. WD-40 does not contain bees' wax or fish oil. WD-40 keeps their recipe secret, but it has been analysed. One of the main components is Stoddard solvent, which is a fancy way of saying mineral spirits and explains why WD-40 can remove labels and adhesive tape residue, One of the other main components is mineral oil and the remaining components are several types of alkanes that have lubricating properties. The solvent part of WD-40 will evaporate and displace water, leaving behind the mineral oil and alkanes to lubricate and protect.
It doesn't work as well as penetrating oil for freeing stuck bolts and pales in comparison to light machine oil as a lubricant. But, I think everyone has a can of it around and being present counts for more than a lot.
I don't have a uBitx yet, but it on the agenda to be ordered in a few weeks. I've just been reading the site and emails as they come in now. The ink is still drying on my amateur license, I do have a fair amount to learn and I was hoping that getting a uBitx will help my curve.
Alan
AE0IX

Bob Lunsford
 

Per Wikipedia:

WD-40's main ingredients as supplied in aerosol cans, according to the US Material Safety Data Sheet information,[14] and with the CAS numbers interpreted:[15]

The UK (and EU) formulation is stated[16] according to the REACH regulations:

  • 60-80% hydrocarbons C9-C11 n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cyclics <2% aromatics
  • 1-5% carbon dioxide

In 2009, Wired published an article with the results of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests on WD-40, showing that the principal components were C9 to C14 alkanes and mineral oil.[17]

Bob — KK5R

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 5:18:58 AM EDT, Raj vu2zap <rajendrakumargg@...> wrote:


WD-40 is meant to loosen rusty nuts and such. I heard it contains fish oil.

I use silicone oil for lubricating such things. I used to get many FT757 with tuning shaft jammed.. I used to clean with isoprophyl alcohol
and remove the gunk and then put a drop of silicone oil.

Raj

At 11/06/2020, you wrote:
>An aerospace electronics company I worked for in the 1970s banned WD-40 from the plant. No one was allowed to even have it in their possession, including the maintenance crew. This was on the orders of the chief production engineer (my father) and the quality-control manager.Â
>
>People would use the stuff on fine bearings and on sensitive mechanical instruments. When all the volatiles evaporated, it left a sticky mess that attracted dust and gummed up the instruments. It simply was not intended as a lubricant, though that is probably its most common (mis)use. To this day, I can't even stand the smell of it.
>
>Todd K7TFC




 

Interesting Bob, thanks!


At 12/06/2020, you wrote:
Per Wikipedia:

WD-40's main ingredients as supplied in aerosol cans, according to the US Material Safety Data Sheet information, [14] and with the CAS numbers interpreted: [15]
The UK (and EU) formulation is stated [16] according to the REACH regulations:
  • 60-80% hydrocarbons C9-C11 n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cyclics <2% aromatics
  • 1-5% carbon dioxide

In 2009, Wired published an article with the results of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests on WD-40, showing that the principal components were C9 to C14 alkanes and mineral oil. [17]
Bob — KK5R

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 5:18:58 AM EDT, Raj vu2zap <rajendrakumargg@...> wrote:


WD-40 is meant to loosen rusty nuts and such. I heard it contains fish oil.

I use silicone oil for lubricating such things. I used to get many FT757 with tuning shaft jammed.. I used to clean with isoprophyl alcohol
and remove the gunk and then put a drop of silicone oil.

Raj

At 11/06/2020, you wrote:
>An aerospace electronics company I worked for in the 1970s banned WD-40 from the plant. No one was allowed to even have it in their possession, including the maintenance crew. This was on the orders of the chief production engineer (my father) and the quality-control manager.Â
>
>People would use the stuff on fine bearings and on sensitive mechanical instruments. When all the volatiles evaporated, it left a sticky mess that attracted dust and gummed up the instruments. It simply was not intended as a lubricant, though that is probably its most common (mis)use. To this day, I can't even stand the smell of it.
>
>Todd K7TFC

Jim Tibbits
 

Always figured it was alcohol and kerosene ...the residue reminded me of kerosene ...Use it only for gross cleaning of 2 cycle carbs...followed by a wash in lacquer thinner

Jim


On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 4:25 PM Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Per Wikipedia:

WD-40's main ingredients as supplied in aerosol cans, according to the US Material Safety Data Sheet information,[14] and with the CAS numbers interpreted:[15]

The UK (and EU) formulation is stated[16] according to the REACH regulations:

  • 60-80% hydrocarbons C9-C11 n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cyclics <2% aromatics
  • 1-5% carbon dioxide

In 2009, Wired published an article with the results of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests on WD-40, showing that the principal components were C9 to C14 alkanes and mineral oil.[17]

Bob — KK5R

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 5:18:58 AM EDT, Raj vu2zap <rajendrakumargg@...> wrote:


WD-40 is meant to loosen rusty nuts and such. I heard it contains fish oil.

I use silicone oil for lubricating such things. I used to get many FT757 with tuning shaft jammed.. I used to clean with isoprophyl alcohol
and remove the gunk and then put a drop of silicone oil.

Raj

At 11/06/2020, you wrote:
>An aerospace electronics company I worked for in the 1970s banned WD-40 from the plant. No one was allowed to even have it in their possession, including the maintenance crew. This was on the orders of the chief production engineer (my father) and the quality-control manager.Â
>
>People would use the stuff on fine bearings and on sensitive mechanical instruments. When all the volatiles evaporated, it left a sticky mess that attracted dust and gummed up the instruments. It simply was not intended as a lubricant, though that is probably its most common (mis)use. To this day, I can't even stand the smell of it.
>
>Todd K7TFC




Aaron K5ATG
 

WD-40 was invented in the 1950's to protect the outer skin of Atlas missiles from rust and other corrosion. It was first called Water Displacement 40th formula. Employes started taking it home and using it and they saw potential at using it around the house, so they shortened the name to WD-40 and made dozens of dollars off of it. 
--
'72
Aaron Scott
QRPARCI# 16443
GQRP# 16389
4SQRP # 1080