Topics

BITX Discussed At Virginia Radio Club Meeting

Bill Meara
 

Jim Wennblom
 

This is an awesome video.

Thanks,

73

Jim

K0HW

Reed N
 

16:52 is the time stamp specifically for BiTX stuff

Definitely worth watching the whole way through, though!


Reed

Arv Evans
 



As Windows merges closer and closer to Linux you can soon expect UNIX time to 
be included in it...if not already there.  In Linux, UNIX, and BSD the "date" command 
provides all the relevant conversions from the UNIX Epoch Time number.  


Arv  K7HKL
_._

_._

On Sun, Jun 14, 2020 at 5:21 PM Reed N <greenkid336600+groupsio@...> wrote:
16:52 is the time stamp specifically for BiTX stuff

Definitely worth watching the whole way through, though!


Reed

Reed N
 

I was referring to the YouTube video's time stamp (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHSr-v4QO7Q&t=16m52s), which is not explicitly related to any computer time keeping strategy, so not sure what you're trying to say, Arv. Where will Unix time be included?


Reed

t.rohner@...
 

Pretty cool to see such relatively simple circuits in times of SDR and FPGA's

73 Thomas

Arv Evans
 

Reed

I think things have become confused.  Someone asked about "UNIX Time" and 
I responded to that question.

The video timestamp  "290 views
Jun 13, 2020" is shown just below the video
image on my Debian Linux video player, but you probably already have that 
information.  If you want more metadata from a video file it is usually available 
in the form of EXIF data (and other formats as well) that is hidden inside the 
file.  Metadata viewers can extract this information.



If you are asking about UNIX Time as it applies to Windows OS,   that was 
exposed in Windows 4.0, but I do not think it has been open since that release 
for 
users to access.  I may be wrong as I do not use Windows OS on any local 
computer.  

Arv
_._


On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 2:18 AM Reed N <greenkid336600+groupsio@...> wrote:
I was referring to the YouTube video's time stamp (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHSr-v4QO7Q&t=16m52s), which is not explicitly related to any computer time keeping strategy, so not sure what you're trying to say, Arv. Where will Unix time be included?


Reed