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Where many of the ICs we still use today were born.

Tom, wb6b
 

HI,

This interesting article shows prototypes like I see in projects in this group, are like the test and development prototypes for many analog ICs. A look into the days before SPICE simulations became the standard.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/analog/what-s-all-pease-prototype-stuff-anyhow?NL=ED-001&Issue=ED-001_20190820_ED-001_721&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1&utm_rid=CPG05000024615509&utm_campaign=27759&utm_medium=email&elq2=ef539cd304a741688af95f32ee05b17b&oly_enc_id=

Tom, wb6b

Jack, W8TEE
 

Really neat stuff!! I loved electronics as far back as I can remember. I got my Novice license when I was 11 (1954), General a year later, and have been licensed ever since. I wanted to be an EE. After the 8th grade, you and your parents met with a high school counselor to decide whether you would pursue pre-college or vocational track. He told my parents I wasn't smart enough to be an EE and that I was destined to stay in my hometown and fix farm equipment. My parents wouldn't hear of it and sent me on the pre-college track, but I remember my hopes of being an EE were dashed...bummer...

Jack, W8TEE

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019, 12:10:30 AM EDT, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:


HI,

This interesting article shows prototypes like I see in projects in this group, are like the test and development prototypes for many analog ICs. A look into the days before SPICE simulations became the standard.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/analog/what-s-all-pease-prototype-stuff-anyhow?NL=ED-001&Issue=ED-001_20190820_ED-001_721&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1&utm_rid=CPG05000024615509&utm_campaign=27759&utm_medium=email&elq2=ef539cd304a741688af95f32ee05b17b&oly_enc_id=

Tom, wb6b

James Lynes
 

My daughter is a PhD economist like you and she took all the math I did as an EE plus some! Maybe you should have stuck it out. Couldn't talk her into IE either...

James

Jack, W8TEE
 

Some day I'll tell the follow-up to the story where I ran into that high school counselor 10 years later...

Jack, W8TEE

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019, 10:09:42 AM EDT, James Lynes <jmlynesjr@...> wrote:


My daughter is a PhD economist like you and she took all the math I did as an EE plus some! Maybe you should have stuck it out. Couldn't talk her into IE either...

James

Graham <planophore@...>
 

speaking of SPICE and circuit simulations, another similar tool Microcap is now a free download. Seems the author has decided to retire or otherwise close shop and has made the tool freely available.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/microcap-12-is-free-(as-in-beer)-now/

cheers, Graham ve3gtc


On 2019-08-21 04:10, Tom, wb6b wrote:
HI,

This interesting article shows prototypes like I see in projects in this group, are like the test and development prototypes for many analog ICs. A look into the days before SPICE simulations became the standard.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/analog/what-s-all-pease-prototype-stuff-anyhow?NL=ED-001&Issue=ED-001_20190820_ED-001_721&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1&utm_rid=CPG05000024615509&utm_campaign=27759&utm_medium=email&elq2=ef539cd304a741688af95f32ee05b17b&oly_enc_id=

Tom, wb6b

jim
 

Someone posted about that (MC12) the other day ...maybe not here, but for all us (L)inux (USERS) ...it seem to load and run just fine on Wine ...Linux Mint 19.1 / wine packages from their repository ..

and thanks for posting about MicroCAP ..Ran ver 4 for years (cause thats all I could afford)

Jim

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019, 9:19:30 PM UTC, Graham <planophore@...> wrote:


speaking of SPICE and circuit simulations, another similar tool Microcap is now a free download. Seems the author has decided to retire or otherwise close shop and has made the tool freely available.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/microcap-12-is-free-(as-in-beer)-now/

cheers, Graham ve3gtc


On 2019-08-21 04:10, Tom, wb6b wrote:
HI,

This interesting article shows prototypes like I see in projects in this group, are like the test and development prototypes for many analog ICs. A look into the days before SPICE simulations became the standard.

https://www.electronicdesign.com/analog/what-s-all-pease-prototype-stuff-anyhow?NL=ED-001&Issue=ED-001_20190820_ED-001_721&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1&utm_rid=CPG05000024615509&utm_campaign=27759&utm_medium=email&elq2=ef539cd304a741688af95f32ee05b17b&oly_enc_id=

Tom, wb6b

n8yg
 

Really cool stuff! When I was at NSC, in the 2000s we had piles of prototyping boards as well, but these were for IC designs that ended up in cell phones and had a lot more jammed into them like many many supplies from charge pump and ldo to complex switchers.  The basis of all from the work of the earlier guys.
Very cool..I wonder if our prototypes will end up in a museum someday... I think more like a dumpster..
73
Brad N8YG

Dexter N Muir
 

As the Ft-227R came to NZ I bought one (had to get ot re-xtalled from 700kHz split - and they used the wrong spec xtals ).
Aside from thacontant kHz or so off-centre, it was fine for the FM, but I lamented the lack of scanning. Fortunately, later on I worked at Tait, production-line tester (and supervisor) for T196/198s. The pick-and-place rarely got things wrong, but faults often resulted in removal and replacement of (among others) the 4011 quad-NAND IC, perfectly functional but now second-hand.

I designed a scanner using these (with a hex-Inverter ;) 6xNOT 4069 gate). This was as LSI was being developed, all was logic-gates: the development path of RTL->DTL->TTL> CMOS - and in among those, MML. What? MML? Yes, Mickey-Mouse L0gic: using stuff to do what it was not designed for, e.g.NOTs for a clock-oscillator.



The switches were a bank of push-buttons (input selectors) from a home stereo, with one modified to release all others.

It worked well, but was clumsy - and activity was not enough to warrant its use. Not much different today here in ZL. :(