Topics

3,5" Firmware did not fit the whole screen

DC8FG
 

Hi Folks,

I downloaded the CEC Firmware Release V1.200 and also Nextion LCD GUI File and Version 1.1 Files (https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx/releases/tag/1.1)
My Display is a 3.5" Enhanced Version and so I tried to install the file "ubitx_35_E.tft" .

After installation the display comes up but it didi not fill the screen completely .

So, I loaded up the hmi-file by using the serial port of the display - the same result.

What went wrong?

 I have an older version which fills the screen complete.

In hope for helpfull hints ...

73, Frank

Jack Purdum
 

I don't know the software that well, but is there a version that is scaled to the larger screen size? Given that the Nextion display reads the graphics from an SD card, it may be a static display. I'm sure someone else can answer definitively.

Jack, W8TEE



On Friday, April 5, 2019, 1:53:34 PM EDT, DC8FG <dc8fg@...> wrote:


Hi Folks,

I downloaded the CEC Firmware Release V1.200 and also Nextion LCD GUI File and Version 1.1 Files (https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx/releases/tag/1.1)
My Display is a 3.5" Enhanced Version and so I tried to install the file "ubitx_35_E.tft" .

After installation the display comes up but it didi not fill the screen completely .

So, I loaded up the hmi-file by using the serial port of the display - the same result.

What went wrong?

 I have an older version which fills the screen complete.

In hope for helpfull hints ...

73, Frank

Sam Tedesco
 

Frank, those files only properly fill the screens up to a 2.8". Anything over that size was given as a "go forth and figure it out" and needs to be resized. Check the "Files" tab to the left and see if any of the 3.5" tft's work for you.

DC8FG
 

Ah, ok, mni tnx for your help!

I found a solution from Ted and it looks pretty good for me - mni tnx for your work Ted!
I think I should familiarize myself more with the configuration of the firmware ...

By the way:

For me it is a bit cumbersome to feed the display with sd-card when it is mounted. So now I use a USB / Serial-TTL-Converter from DeLock. Data transfer takes much longer than using the SD card, but this time is the right time for a big cup of coffee ;-)

73, Frank

Ted
 

You're quite welcomed, Frank. I've learned a few things by trying, while the next step will be to begin from scratch or close to it. 

If this has helped one guy or just a few, it was worth it.  Perhaps we will work on the air together some day.

73,

Ted
K3RTA

DC8FG
 

tnx again ted, yes every day new challenges comes up in our wonderfull hobby ;-)

And it is so great that so much OM work together worldwide to find solutions for this challenges and help each other.

This is one of the reasons why I love amateur radio.

hpe cuagn on air :-)


73,
Frank, DC8FG

Laurence Oberman
 

Hi Frank,
Interesting, how do you update the Nextion via serial.
What do you have to do to the Nextion when sending serial streams.

Thanks
Laurence

On Sat, Apr 6, 2019 at 5:57 AM DC8FG <dc8fg@...> wrote:

Ah, ok, mni tnx for your help!

I found a solution from Ted #67572 and it looks pretty good for me - mni tnx for your work Ted!
I think I should familiarize myself more with the configuration of the firmware ...

By the way:

For me it is a bit cumbersome to feed the display with sd-card when it is mounted. So now I use a USB / Serial-TTL-Converter from DeLock. Data transfer takes much longer than using the SD card, but this time is the right time for a big cup of coffee ;-)

73, Frank

DC8FG
 

Hi Laurence,

first, it is very important to have a level converter (e.g. DeLock Converter USB 2.0 male > Serial TTL) because the µCs serial Port on the Raduino-Board will be toasted if you connect it directly to the computers serial port.
Connect the four wires from the Nextion to the Converter and make sure, that RX and TX Lines are crossed (RX-Line from Nextion to the Converters TX Line and TX-Line from the Nextion to the converters RX-Line).
Load the .hmi-File which belongs to your display into the Nextion-Editor and press the upload-button.

The Nextion-Editor tries to find the converters serial port automatically, otherwise you have to choose it manually in the dropdownbox.
Press the GO-Button and the file should now be transfered to the Display (this will take a little while and you can see the upload status on the display).

When the upload is finnished, disconnect the converter and connect the display to the raduino board.

73, Frank

Laurence Oberman
 

Got it, Yep, ttl<->cmos level conversion always very important with
Serial comms.
Thanks for explaining that the software will look for the serial connectivity.
Regards
Laurence

On Sun, Apr 7, 2019 at 7:50 AM DC8FG <dc8fg@...> wrote:

Hi Laurence,

first, it is very important to have a level converter (e.g. DeLock Converter USB 2.0 male > Serial TTL) because the µCs serial Port on the Raduino-Board will be toasted if you connect it directly to the computers serial port.
Connect the four wires from the Nextion to the Converter and make sure, that RX and TX Lines are crossed (RX-Line from Nextion to the Converters TX Line and TX-Line from the Nextion to the converters RX-Line).
Load the .hmi-File which belongs to your display into the Nextion-Editor and press the upload-button.

The Nextion-Editor tries to find the converters serial port automatically, otherwise you have to choose it manually in the dropdownbox.
Press the GO-Button and the file should now be transfered to the Display (this will take a little while and you can see the upload status on the display).

When the upload is finnished, disconnect the converter and connect the display to the raduino board.

73, Frank

Jerry Gaffke
 

Hmm, looks like an excellent opportunity for a rant.   ;-)
Safely ignored if you already know about RS2332 signal levels, 5v vs 3.3v  logic levels,
and going from USB to UART signalling.

>  First, it is very important to have a level converter (e.g. DeLock Converter USB 2.0 male > Serial TTL)
>  because the µCs serial Port on the Raduino-Board will be toasted if you connect it directly to the computers serial port.

>  Yep, ttl<->cmos level conversion always very important with Serial comms.


A serial port from an old PC uses RS232 signal levels, typically logic levels of -12v for a mark, +12v for a space.
Those RS232 signal levels are from a 60 year old standard, now more than a little bit archaic.
So that old 9 pin PC serial port is RS232 signal levels, not compatible with TTL or CMOS logic levels.

A MAX232 chip will take RS232 to 5v logic levels of +5v for a mark, 0v for a space (it inverts the signal).
  https://www.sparkfun.com/tutorials/215
There are similar parts to take it to 3.3v logic levels, if that's what you need.

The ATMega328P chip on our Nano's uses the same UART protocol as the old RS232 standard,
but at voltage levels of +5v for a mark, and 0v for a space.  So compatible with the logic side of the MAX232 chip.
A chip on our Nano clone (the CH340) allows a modern computer's USB port to talk to
the ATMega328P's 5v UART lines, no RS232 signal levels involved at all.

Generally, if operating from the same supply, TTL and CMOS logic can be directly connected.
If you have 5v TTL and 3v CMOS, it will mostly work except you need some way to protect
the 3.3v CMOS receiver from the 5v TTL high levels, perhaps just a resistive divider.
The threshold between logic 0 and logic 1 of a TTL receiver is typically down around 1v,
so transmitting from CMOS 3.3v into a 5v TTL receiver works just fine.

Transmitting from 3.3v CMOS into 5v CMOS can be unreliable, that depends on what the
threshold of the 5v CMOS receiver is, might be around 5v/2 = 2.5v  (read the datasheet).
Some combination of voltage loss through the 3.3v driver, a high 5v CMOS receiver threshold
(often around 2.5v), a volt or so of hysteresis at the 5v receiver, a bit of noise in grounding
(or RF getting injected into the cables) is a recipe for trouble.
Some sort of 5v buffer device that has a lower receive threshold inserted between the two would solve this.

For long cables, a differential signaling scheme such as RS422/RS485 or LVDS
can go much faster than RS232.  If ground currents might be an issue, optocouplers can be used
at the receiving end.  But RS232 still works as well as it did 60 yrs ago if you don't need the speed.

  
On modern computers we don't have RS232 serial ports, we have USB ports.
There are several devices out there like the CH340 on the Nano clones
to convert from USB to UART at 3.3v or 5v logic levels.
Here a USB to UART module that works with either 5v or 3.3v logic:
    https://www.oddwires.com/cp2102-serial-adapter-module-usb-to-rs232-with-jumper-wires/
The USB connection provides 5v power, the module has a voltage regulator to supply 3.3v
to the CP2102 chip from SiLabs.  Logic levels on the TX UART line from the CP2102 is 0v/3.3v,
but 3.3v is usually high enugh to be seen as a high on a 5v processor such as the ATMega328P.
The RX UART line going into the CP2102 is tolerant of up to 5.8v, the threshold between
low and high is somewhere between 0.8v and 2.0v, so works fine with the 5v signal from the ATMega328P.
That module has user pins labeled GND, RXD (in), TXD (out), 3.3V (out), 5V (out), RST (in).
The 3.3v and 5v pins are there to power your logic, but don't draw more than 100ma or so from 3.3v.
The RST pin can be used to reset the USB interface, but I'd just leave it unconnected.
The CP2102 may require a special driver installed on some operating systems (such as MsWin),
my Ubuntu install came with the required software driver.

The FTDI chips (and cable assemblies) are also very popular for this sort of thing:
    https://www.ftdichip.com/Products/Cables/USBTTLSerial.htm

Jerry, KE7ER

Laurence Oberman
 

Indeed
Of late have only had to worry about converting between 3.3 and 5v. But I do remember replacing driver chips max232 on Unix servers when the RS232c interfaces failed.

Takes me back to 1982😀

On Sun, Apr 7, 2019, 1:21 PM Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hmm, looks like an excellent opportunity for a rant.   ;-)
Safely ignored if you already know about RS2332 signal levels, 5v vs 3.3v  logic levels,
and going from USB to UART signalling.

>  First, it is very important to have a level converter (e.g. DeLock Converter USB 2.0 male > Serial TTL)
>  because the µCs serial Port on the Raduino-Board will be toasted if you connect it directly to the computers serial port.

>  Yep, ttl<->cmos level conversion always very important with Serial comms.


A serial port from an old PC uses RS232 signal levels, typically logic levels of -12v for a mark, +12v for a space.
Those RS232 signal levels are from a 60 year old standard, now more than a little bit archaic.
So that old 9 pin PC serial port is RS232 signal levels, not compatible with TTL or CMOS logic levels.

A MAX232 chip will take RS232 to 5v logic levels of +5v for a mark, 0v for a space (it inverts the signal).
  https://www.sparkfun.com/tutorials/215
There are similar parts to take it to 3.3v logic levels, if that's what you need.

The ATMega328P chip on our Nano's uses the same UART protocol as the old RS232 standard,
but at voltage levels of +5v for a mark, and 0v for a space.  So compatible with the logic side of the MAX232 chip.
A chip on our Nano clone (the CH340) allows a modern computer's USB port to talk to
the ATMega328P's 5v UART lines, no RS232 signal levels involved at all.

Generally, if operating from the same supply, TTL and CMOS logic can be directly connected.
If you have 5v TTL and 3v CMOS, it will mostly work except you need some way to protect
the 3.3v CMOS receiver from the 5v TTL high levels, perhaps just a resistive divider.
The threshold between logic 0 and logic 1 of a TTL receiver is typically down around 1v,
so transmitting from CMOS 3.3v into a 5v TTL receiver works just fine.

Transmitting from 3.3v CMOS into 5v CMOS can be unreliable, that depends on what the
threshold of the 5v CMOS receiver is, might be around 5v/2 = 2.5v  (read the datasheet).
Some combination of voltage loss through the 3.3v driver, a high 5v CMOS receiver threshold
(often around 2.5v), a volt or so of hysteresis at the 5v receiver, a bit of noise in grounding
(or RF getting injected into the cables) is a recipe for trouble.
Some sort of 5v buffer device that has a lower receive threshold inserted between the two would solve this.

For long cables, a differential signaling scheme such as RS422/RS485 or LVDS
can go much faster than RS232.  If ground currents might be an issue, optocouplers can be used
at the receiving end.  But RS232 still works as well as it did 60 yrs ago if you don't need the speed.

  
On modern computers we don't have RS232 serial ports, we have USB ports.
There are several devices out there like the CH340 on the Nano clones
to convert from USB to UART at 3.3v or 5v logic levels.
Here a USB to UART module that works with either 5v or 3.3v logic:
    https://www.oddwires.com/cp2102-serial-adapter-module-usb-to-rs232-with-jumper-wires/
The USB connection provides 5v power, the module has a voltage regulator to supply 3.3v
to the CP2102 chip from SiLabs.  Logic levels on the TX UART line from the CP2102 is 0v/3.3v,
but 3.3v is usually high enugh to be seen as a high on a 5v processor such as the ATMega328P.
The RX UART line going into the CP2102 is tolerant of up to 5.8v, the threshold between
low and high is somewhere between 0.8v and 2.0v, so works fine with the 5v signal from the ATMega328P.
That module has user pins labeled GND, RXD (in), TXD (out), 3.3V (out), 5V (out), RST (in).
The 3.3v and 5v pins are there to power your logic, but don't draw more than 100ma or so from 3.3v.
The RST pin can be used to reset the USB interface, but I'd just leave it unconnected.
The CP2102 may require a special driver installed on some operating systems (such as MsWin),
my Ubuntu install came with the required software driver.

The FTDI chips (and cable assemblies) are also very popular for this sort of thing:
    https://www.ftdichip.com/Products/Cables/USBTTLSerial.htm

Jerry, KE7ER

Jerry Gaffke
 

One other thing:

The MAX232 is just a logic level converter, between RS232 voltages and TTL/CMOS logic levels
The underlying UART protocol remains the same.
The UART protocol could be described in a paragraph.

USB is a different protocol all together, and ridiculously complex:
    https://www.usb.org/documents
There's much more than logic level conversion going on inside the USB-to-UART devices.

USB is fine, so long as somebody else makes it work for me.
UART's are far simpler, easily debugged using something like a $20 scope from JYETech.
    https://www.banggood.com/Orignal-JYE-Tech-DS0150-15001K-DSO-SHELL-DIY-Digital-Oscilloscope-Kit-With-Housing-p-1093865.html?cur_warehouse=CN

Jerry