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uBITX HF transceiver and blue MBITX metal case.

Ian Reeve
 

At a recent Radio Rally in the UK I happened acrosss a unbuilt uBITX kit and matching metal case.
The case is punched for a tx/rx bi-colour led and thanks to this group I have found the wiring needed for this.
The case also comes with small pcb for the led,for the tuning encoder,for the power and fuse assembly and for the three jack plugs, mic/ptt,key and phones.

It also came with a Digital board that fixes to the rear of the case. There is no information on this board or its wiring, it contains 2 jack sockets, a USB and a 9pin D Sub.

Any help would be appreciated on the latter item.
Thankyou and 73 de Ian M0IDR

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Ian,

My first wild guess about that 9-pin D sub is the old serial port rig control. Most of us have been forced to abandon that for USB but some of us still have radios with those. Hams who have radios with the old serial ports and computers without - or - radios with only USB ports and computers with only serial ports have to go out of their way with kludge adapters. If your station does not use that old-time infrastructure just ignore that D opening. Maybe yours has a different purpose. It's there if you can find use for it.

I have a radio that uses the D-shell connector for old style T-R switching from the computer. None of my computers have those any more. I installed a vox circuit for use with fldigi. The D-connector just sits there with no duties any more. I could buy an adapter to avoid building and mounting the vox unit. One more thing and it's cables to manage.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 07/23/2018 05:20 PM, Ian Reeve wrote:
At a recent Radio Rally in the UK I happened acrosss a unbuilt uBITX kit
and matching metal case.
The case is punched for a tx/rx bi-colour led and thanks to this group I
have found the wiring needed for this.
The case also comes with small pcb for the led,for the tuning
encoder,for the power and fuse assembly and for the three jack plugs,
mic/ptt,key and phones.

It also came with a Digital board that fixes to the rear of the case.
There is no information on this board or its wiring, it contains 2 jack
sockets, a USB and a 9pin D Sub.

Any help would be appreciated on the latter item.
Thankyou and 73 de Ian M0IDR
--
bark less - wag more

Jim Strohm
 

Bill Cromwell wrote:
"My first wild guess about that 9-pin D sub is the old serial port rig control. Most of us have been forced to abandon that for USB but some of us still have radios with those. Hams who have radios with the old serial ports and computers without - or - radios with only USB ports and computers with only serial ports have to go out of their way with kludge adapters. If your station does not use that old-time infrastructure just ignore that D opening. Maybe yours has a different purpose. It's there if you can find use for it.

I have a radio that uses the D-shell connector for old style T-R switching from the computer. None of my computers have those any more. I installed a vox circuit for use with fldigi. The D-connector just sits there with no duties any more. I could buy an adapter to avoid building and mounting the vox unit. One more thing and it's cables to manage."

In my last field of professional endeavor (product documentation for microcontrollers and industrial equipment) a lot of the "next to new" equipment like endpoint sensors and plasma generators used proprietary, one-off serial interfaces at baud rates from the last millennium.  Documenting them and getting them to work was always a challenge.  Once I had to translate two plasma generator manuals from Japanese using google language tools just so our apps and field engineers could get the plasma generators talking to our controllers -- WITHOUT any support from our field office in Japan.  That project failed, but not on my account.

These serial interfaces should have been deprecated more than a decade ago when USB started to come on the market.  Considering that today you can get a USB-capable Arduino or Raspberry Pi microcontroller board that speaks USB for far less than $100, there's absolutely no reason for manufacturers to keep using outdated proprietary serial interfaces -- we HAVE a standard serial interface, and it's called USB.

Still, this industrial equipment lasts a long time.  I have a few as-new plasma generators with serial interfaces that are nearly old enough to vote.  Any surplus stuff I get nowadays that has a serial interface, the first thing I do is rip out the interface, because I'll never get documentation or software for it, even if I can translate from Japanese or even Mandarin with google language tools.

Eventually I'll get around to learning how to interface one of the aforementioned micro boards to this stuff.   Meantime?  If it's DB-9, DB-25, RS232?  JUNK IT!

Off my soap box...

73
Jim N6OTQ

Jerry Gaffke
 

Being a product of the previous millenium myself, I have no problem with equipment that has a UART.
There are variations, but this paragraph on "data framing" is most of what you need to know:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_asynchronous_receiver-transmitter#Data_framing

If you really want to understand USB then be my guest, it can take years:
    http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/

The solution for punters like me happy to get by with 115.2 kBaud are chips such as the CH340 used
on the Nano, the FTDI chips on the original Arduinos, and the CP2102 from Silicon Labs. 
This CP2102 item just works on my Ubuntu box, no drivers needed:
    http://www.oddwires.com/cp2102-serial-adapter-module-usb-to-rs232-with-jumper-wires/
First tie the UART's TX and RX lines together, run a loopback test from the host to prove the USB-to-UART device is working.
If it doesn't magically work, then move on to a different device driver, USB port, USB-to-UART device, host OS, or host computer.
Once you get that going, it's easy enough to get the UART to talk to the microcontroller of your choice.

Given some random USB device, if you happen to have appropriate software for your host computer
then it can just work when you plug in that USB cable.  If it doesn't, good luck.
I'd much prefer to debug a UART connection.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 06:51 AM, Jim Strohm wrote:
In my last field of professional endeavor (product documentation for microcontrollers and industrial equipment) a lot of the "next to new" equipment like endpoint sensors and plasma generators used proprietary, one-off serial interfaces at baud rates from the last millennium.  Documenting them and getting them to work was always a challenge.

David McGaw
 

Most simple USB interfaces are in fact RS-232 serial ports internally.  If there is a DE9 or DB25 RS-232 serial port on a device, use a USB to Serial adapter.  NBD.

David N1HAC


On 7/24/18 11:24 AM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io wrote:
Being a product of the previous millenium myself, I have no problem with equipment that has a UART.
There are variations, but this paragraph on "data framing" is most of what you need to know:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_asynchronous_receiver-transmitter#Data_framing

If you really want to understand USB then be my guest, it can take years:
    http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/

The solution for punters like me happy to get by with 115.2 kBaud are chips such as the CH340 used
on the Nano, the FTDI chips on the original Arduinos, and the CP2102 from Silicon Labs. 
This CP2102 item just works on my Ubuntu box, no drivers needed:
    http://www.oddwires.com/cp2102-serial-adapter-module-usb-to-rs232-with-jumper-wires/
First tie the UART's TX and RX lines together, run a loopback test from the host to prove the USB-to-UART device is working.
If it doesn't magically work, then move on to a different device driver, USB port, USB-to-UART device, host OS, or host computer.
Once you get that going, it's easy enough to get the UART to talk to the microcontroller of your choice.

Given some random USB device, if you happen to have appropriate software for your host computer
then it can just work when you plug in that USB cable.  If it doesn't, good luck.
I'd much prefer to debug a UART connection.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 06:51 AM, Jim Strohm wrote:
In my last field of professional endeavor (product documentation for microcontrollers and industrial equipment) a lot of the "next to new" equipment like endpoint sensors and plasma generators used proprietary, one-off serial interfaces at baud rates from the last millennium.  Documenting them and getting them to work was always a challenge.

Arv Evans
 

Jerry

And...DB9 and DB25 connectors are relatively cheap, robust, and readily available as salvage
from old modems and PCs.  One does not have to use them for RS-232.  They can be re-purposed
as connectors for other protocols and other uses. 

Arv
_._


On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 9:40 AM David McGaw <david.g.mcgaw@...> wrote:
Most simple USB interfaces are in fact RS-232 serial ports internally.  If there is a DE9 or DB25 RS-232 serial port on a device, use a USB to Serial adapter.  NBD.

David N1HAC


On 7/24/18 11:24 AM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io wrote:
Being a product of the previous millenium myself, I have no problem with equipment that has a UART.
There are variations, but this paragraph on "data framing" is most of what you need to know:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_asynchronous_receiver-transmitter#Data_framing

If you really want to understand USB then be my guest, it can take years:
    http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/

The solution for punters like me happy to get by with 115.2 kBaud are chips such as the CH340 used
on the Nano, the FTDI chips on the original Arduinos, and the CP2102 from Silicon Labs. 
This CP2102 item just works on my Ubuntu box, no drivers needed:
    http://www.oddwires.com/cp2102-serial-adapter-module-usb-to-rs232-with-jumper-wires/
First tie the UART's TX and RX lines together, run a loopback test from the host to prove the USB-to-UART device is working.
If it doesn't magically work, then move on to a different device driver, USB port, USB-to-UART device, host OS, or host computer.
Once you get that going, it's easy enough to get the UART to talk to the microcontroller of your choice.

Given some random USB device, if you happen to have appropriate software for your host computer
then it can just work when you plug in that USB cable.  If it doesn't, good luck.
I'd much prefer to debug a UART connection.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 06:51 AM, Jim Strohm wrote:
In my last field of professional endeavor (product documentation for microcontrollers and industrial equipment) a lot of the "next to new" equipment like endpoint sensors and plasma generators used proprietary, one-off serial interfaces at baud rates from the last millennium.  Documenting them and getting them to work was always a challenge.

Sunil Sankaranarayanan
 

Ian,
        Looks like you have the uBitx case from Sunil Lakhani VU3SUA / amatuerradiokits.in  Attached are the pix for wiring up the Ubitx and the additional boards in the Case. It is documented at various places by VU3SUA. I have downloaded all the pix and put it into a single folder and that should help you.

73
Sunil Sankaranarayanan VU2MTM

Paul Galburt - K2AYZ
 

Hi, Jim

With regard to the demise of RS-232, it's important to remember that these same UARTS support RS-422 and RS-485 multi-drop. These protocols are still in wide use (particularly RS-485) in industrial settings because of robustness, simplicity and economy as compared with (for example) Ethernet in the same setting. USB is strictly point-to-point and, while offering good bandwidth, is greatly distance limited compared with 422/485.
 USB is also generally lacking the fully isolated solutions that are often required between "unfriendly" components.

For example, if you want to control something slightly smart up on a tower 500 ft away, isolated and slew rate limited RS-422 is the way to go. USB won't work and copper Ethernet's distance limit rules it out.. Fiber would be nice but gets pricy and complex - and you still likely need power wires.

In short, while most common applications of RS-232 can be replaced by USB (as long as you have some real smarts at both ends), the RS-422/485 applications are still out of reach.

Just my opinions, of course.

73,

Paul K2AYZ

Roy Appleton
 

Sunil, thank you very much for the collection of photos!

Roy
WA0YMH

On Sun, Jul 29, 2018, 1:07 AM Sunil Sankaranarayanan <vu2mtm@...> wrote:
Ian,
        Looks like you have the uBitx case from Sunil Lakhani VU3SUA / amatuerradiokits.in  Attached are the pix for wiring up the Ubitx and the additional boards in the Case. It is documented at various places by VU3SUA. I have downloaded all the pix and put it into a single folder and that should help you.

73
Sunil Sankaranarayanan VU2MTM

Ian Reeve
 

Dear Sunil, Thank you so much for the info and pics of case assembly,interface pcb etc.Exactly what I required to complete the USB link from the session to the outside world.Having such fun assembling the rig and the only difference is that I have used the pcb for the Jack ports.Cheers. Ian M0IDR


From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Roy Appleton <twelveoclockhigh@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 2:55:33 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] uBITX HF transceiver and blue MBITX metal case.
 
Sunil, thank you very much for the collection of photos!

Roy
WA0YMH

On Sun, Jul 29, 2018, 1:07 AM Sunil Sankaranarayanan <vu2mtm@...> wrote:
Ian,
        Looks like you have the uBitx case from Sunil Lakhani VU3SUA / amatuerradiokits.in  Attached are the pix for wiring up the Ubitx and the additional boards in the Case. It is documented at various places by VU3SUA. I have downloaded all the pix and put it into a single folder and that should help you.

73
Sunil Sankaranarayanan VU2MTM

Eddie Esserman
 

how do we open this rar file, looks like what i'm looking for.  can't find where the led leads connect to the board, and which 3 leads the mic connector uses.  been
away for a while, but having fun with this.  the connector board on the back, which i won't be using, hates solder, it seems.  The folder Sunil sent looks great, any help would be appreciated.  On a macbook.  Tnx.

Eddie

Kevin Rea
 

Use a program called WinRAR


On Tue, Jul 31, 2018, 7:25 PM Eddie Esserman <ee@...> wrote:
how do we open this rar file, looks like what i'm looking for.  can't find where the led leads connect to the board, and which 3 leads the mic connector uses.  been
away for a while, but having fun with this.  the connector board on the back, which i won't be using, hates solder, it seems.  The folder Sunil sent looks great, any help would be appreciated.  On a macbook.  Tnx.

Eddie

Eddie Esserman
 

Dear Sunil,

How do we (I, actually, the other good students got it) open the rar file on a mac?  Thanks.  Coming along nicely.  How do you have time to make cases, answering all of our questions.  But we are grateful

Eddie

Mark M
 

Google 'rar file mac'. Lots of options.

Mark AA7TA

On 7/31/18 7:28 PM, Eddie Esserman wrote:
Dear Sunil,
How do we (I, actually, the other good students got it) open the rar file on a mac? ...

Ian Reeve
 

Rar files can be opened by winzip.you will then get several images to help you.  73. Ian


From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Mark M <junquemaile@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 4:07:49 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] uBITX HF transceiver and blue MBITX metal case.
 
Google 'rar file mac'. Lots of options.

Mark   AA7TA

On 7/31/18 7:28 PM, Eddie Esserman wrote:
> Dear Sunil,
>
> How do we (I, actually, the other good students got it) open the rar
> file on a mac? ...



Sunil Sankaranarayanan
 

Eddie,
            Check this out(from Google)

How to Open and Extract RAR Files on macOS or Mac OSX ...

https://appletoolbox.com/2015/10/how-to-extract-rar-files-on-mac-osx/
7
Sunil Sankaranarayanan VU2MTM