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Removing insulation from fine wires


JOHN CRONHELM <johncronhelm@...>
 

My wire stripper won't strip these small digital and audio wires. I used a sharp blade around the circumference of insulation but very labour intensive.
Any better ideas?
John VO1jcc.


alans77@...
 

On Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 12:47 pm, JOHN CRONHELM wrote:
My wire stripper won't strip these small digital and audio wires. I used a sharp blade around the circumference of insulation but very labour intensive.
Any better ideas?
John VO1jcc.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FZPHMUG/ref=sxbs_sxwds-stvpv2_1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=3233965245922079678&pd_rd_wg=oszBO&pf_rd_r=XFR8DXN39HACAPKCBKXC&pf_rd_s=desktop-sx-bottom-slot&pf_rd_t=301&pd_rd_i=B00FZPHMUG&pd_rd_w=KlLtx&pf_rd_i=thermal%2Bwire%2Bstripper&pd_rd_r=aa77df09-5e42-4cbe-8ea6-af93365b9b81&ie=UTF8&qid=1530649732&sr=1&th=1


Doug W
 

I've used one like the picture below for years.  I think I picked it up at Harbor Freight for a few bucks with a coupon.  I had always heard it was an awful tool but figured I would give it a try.  After a little adjusting it has been by go to for small gauge wire ever since.  I think Harbor Freight is US only but you could probably find something similar at Canadian Tire or your favorite purveyor of Chinesium finery.


--
www.bitxmap.com


Clark Martin
 

I have an old pair of strippers I keep around for fine wires.  They are like these:


You adjust a sliding screw to set the size so they are not as convenient for stripping “regular” size wires but they can be adjusted for any size wire up to their maximum size.

Clark Martin
KK6ISP

On Jul 3, 2018, at 12:47 PM, JOHN CRONHELM <johncronhelm@...> wrote:

My wire stripper won't strip these small digital and audio wires. I used a sharp blade around the circumference of insulation but very labour intensive.
Any better ideas?
John VO1jcc.



Rob Snow
 

I use my teeth.  I gave up trying to find a pair of strippers that would strip the insulation while not taking a few of a braid with it.  If it's really hard insulation, I'll score it first.

I'm sure this is not recommended.


Brian L. Davis
 

I've always used a small pen knife kept very sharp.  It takes a while but you can feel the difference between the insulation and the wire underneath.
I just hold the wire and roll it with my thumb against the blade to strip the insulation off.
The only problem comes when you get a different knife, I've nicked my thumb more than once with a new knife I wasn't used to.


Adrian
 

I used to use my teeth aswell until stripping wire one day broke a chunk of tooth off. Now use my thumb nail and finger

Adrian


John Smith
 


I use these for CAT5 wires for the breadboard, and 30 AWG wire wrapping wire. There is a sliding screw nut that the opposing side hits against to set the depth of cut for repeated stripping of the same size wire. And I use a velcro strap to kinda hold the handles partly together, otherwise they spring out far apart. Or you could look for strippers that also strips 30 AWG. They have about 6 small wire sizes on those, and they are almost never in a store, you have to order them.


Jack, W8TEE
 

I checked eBay and they were about $8 + $5 shipping. Then I checked Harbor Freight and it's $2.50. You have to look hard, but it also has the adjustment mechanism.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, July 3, 2018, 8:47:31 PM EDT, John Smith via Groups.Io <johnlinux77@...> wrote:



I use these for CAT5 wires for the breadboard, and 30 AWG wire wrapping wire. There is a sliding screw nut that the opposing side hits against to set the depth of cut for repeated stripping of the same size wire. And I use a velcro strap to kinda hold the handles partly together, otherwise they spring out far apart. Or you could look for strippers that also strips 30 AWG. They have about 6 small wire sizes on those, and they are almost never in a store, you have to order them.


John Smith
 

I see them in Harbor Freight and Home Depot stores. I think they might be 5 or 6 bucks at H .D. Once you get them set they are great. The one in the other picture post can be found on ebay and are smaller than HF strippers but actually work better with a metal bottom lip to grip the insulation. Those a about 2 bucks too.   Alright back quiet again.


R. E. Klaus <reklaus@...>
 

About 16 years ago I worked on security systems and one of the things we did was replace the standard screen in windows with screen that has a wire spaced a few inches apart to set off the alarm if the screen is cut. I bought a Craftsman 73574 wire stripper that went down to 32 gage for those jobs. I don't know if Sears still has them but you might find them on ebay, etc.


atouk
 

I use a small set of dykes (diagonal cutting pliers).  An old pair, new ones are too sharp.  Once you get a feel for it, you can pinch the insulation without cutting into the copper, and then just pull the insulation off.

Dull/used cutters will break the insulation enough to cause it to separate when you pull it off without damaging the wire.


On 7/3/2018 3:47 PM, JOHN CRONHELM wrote:
My wire stripper won't strip these small digital and audio wires. I used a sharp blade around the circumference of insulation but very labour intensive.
Any better ideas?
John VO1jcc.


Robert Alexander
 

Those are great for stripping or cutting. I used one for 30 years for stripping wires of almost any gauge.

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Smith via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 7:47 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing insulation from fine wires

 


I use these for CAT5 wires for the breadboard, and 30 AWG wire wrapping wire. There is a sliding screw nut that the opposing side hits against to set the depth of cut for repeated stripping of the same size wire. And I use a velcro strap to kinda hold the handles partly together, otherwise they spring out far apart. Or you could look for strippers that also strips 30 AWG. They have about 6 small wire sizes on those, and they are almost never in a store, you have to order them.


Richard Spohn
 

I usually use a pair of strippers. They usually use their teeth.

- Rich WB2GXM

On 7/3/18, Adrian <a.futrill@...> wrote:
I used to use my teeth aswell until stripping wire one day broke a chunk of
tooth off. Now use my thumb nail and finger

Adrian






AA9GG
 

In a pinch, I have used my lighter.  Quickly heat the area you want the strip to start at and then grip the wire firmly and give the insulation a pull.  Kids...don't try this at home.


On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 2:52 PM, Richard Spohn <wb2gxm@...> wrote:
I usually use a pair of strippers.  They usually use their teeth.

- Rich WB2GXM

On 7/3/18, Adrian <a.futrill@...> wrote:
> I used to use my teeth aswell until stripping wire one day broke a chunk of
> tooth off. Now use my thumb nail and finger
>
> Adrian
>
>
>
>
>
>






--
Paul Mateer, AA9GG
Elan Engineering Corp.
www.elanengr.com
NAQCC 3123, SKCC 4628


Robert Ogburn
 

Way back---I used my teeth...   
The insulation types available today preclude the use of a single hobby price tool. You need to develop your own method for striping the insulation for each insulation type.  My "go to" tools include butane lighters, very very very sharp pen knife used in the fashion described by Mr Davis, x-acto style hobby knife with #11 blade and a home made hot wire stripper...  For coaxial cable I find the "spin around tool" almost essential. They do need maintenance and periodic "calibration".
I still have not developed a technique for removing "enamel" insulation.  Trying strong UV @ 365nM currently...


Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...>
 

For enameled wire such as magnet wire, I use extra fine sandpaper when there's enough length. If it's extra-tough lacquer, I use a lighter. Recently, I tested the electric arc lighter I picked up because it looked nifty (I don't smoke) and could be recharged via USB, and it removed the lacquer right the heck now. Heavier gauge magnet wire is a little harder to de-lacquer using this method, but it does work. Hold the wire with pliers, not your fingers, though.

Other wire, it depends on the thickness and type of insulation. PVC insulation on thin wires I used to strip with my teeth, but given that I'm a lot older now, I don't put my teeth through that lest I loosen them inadvertently. Careful stripping with a pair of diagonal cutters, flush cutters, or the wire-cutter on a pair of needle-nose pliers works most of the time, except when I squeeze it too tightly and clip the end off. Murphy's Law tends to cause this when you just went to a lot of trouble to prepare the wire and you don't have a lot of extra length, such as when soldering thin coax to a connector. If you have lots of extra length, it'll strip perfectly without effort. But when it matters, you'll probably nip off the end at least once.

My pocketknife works for most wire, and I'm used to doing it carefully, so I don't nick the wire, though removing the outer jacket on coax does usually result in a couple of shield braid strands getting nicked.

I have the cheap strippers with little gauge-marked holes that simply never work and shouldn't be purchased as they're a waste of money. Get a good spring-controlled stripper or one with an adjustable gauge on it instead.


Robert Ogburn
 

365 nm...   Here is a picture of the coaxial tool (Harbor Freight)


Robert Ogburn
 

On Fri, Jul 6, 2018 at 09:13 am, Gwen Patton wrote  ".....electric arc lighter"
thanks for the lead!


Jack, W8TEE
 

How much trouble would I be in if I said you appear to be a professional stripper?

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, July 6, 2018, 12:13:54 PM EDT, Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:


For enameled wire such as magnet wire, I use extra fine sandpaper when there's enough length. If it's extra-tough lacquer, I use a lighter. Recently, I tested the electric arc lighter I picked up because it looked nifty (I don't smoke) and could be recharged via USB, and it removed the lacquer right the heck now. Heavier gauge magnet wire is a little harder to de-lacquer using this method, but it does work. Hold the wire with pliers, not your fingers, though.

Other wire, it depends on the thickness and type of insulation. PVC insulation on thin wires I used to strip with my teeth, but given that I'm a lot older now, I don't put my teeth through that lest I loosen them inadvertently. Careful stripping with a pair of diagonal cutters, flush cutters, or the wire-cutter on a pair of needle-nose pliers works most of the time, except when I squeeze it too tightly and clip the end off. Murphy's Law tends to cause this when you just went to a lot of trouble to prepare the wire and you don't have a lot of extra length, such as when soldering thin coax to a connector. If you have lots of extra length, it'll strip perfectly without effort. But when it matters, you'll probably nip off the end at least once.

My pocketknife works for most wire, and I'm used to doing it carefully, so I don't nick the wire, though removing the outer jacket on coax does usually result in a couple of shield braid strands getting nicked.

I have the cheap strippers with little gauge-marked holes that simply never work and shouldn't be purchased as they're a waste of money. Get a good spring-controlled stripper or one with an adjustable gauge on it instead.