Topics

VOM Advice? Simpson 260

tituskz1g@...
 

You can't go wrong with a Simpson Model 260 VOM.  Yes, it dates to the 1960' or '70's, but it's a well-built meter that will serve you nicely for years.  It uses batteries for ohms measurements, so you'll need to replace them about every 18 months.  You can find Simpson 260 meters on Ebay for $US 50 or less.  No semiconductors inside, just resistors.  I've had mine since 1970 and couldn't do basic V, O, or M measurements without it.  Buy a set of good test leads and you're all set forever.
--
Jon Titus, KZ1G
Herriman, UT USA

Ralph Mowery
 

They go back before that.  I have 2.  One bought new around 1990 and one that I got when my  dad died.  Not sure how old that one is but I know he had it in the 1950's.

Both seem to be with in spec as verified by my digital Fluke.  

Now even the 'Free " harbor freight meters seem very good for general testing.  I have verified 4 of them and they are all close enough for hobby testing. Usually the last digit would only be one to three numbers off   As they were 'free' I have them laying around several places in the basement just so I do not have to walk across the room.  One in my truck.  

With many of the digital meters going for less than $ 20, probably any of them would be fine now.  If they do 'blow up', not too much lost.
I just would not want to use them on anything with over 120 volts that could put out over an amp of current.  After seeing some safety films put out by Fluke one gets skiddish when working on some 480 volt 3 phase equipment that can put out over 500 amps like I worked on  with the inexpensive meters.  

On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 3:22 PM, <tituskz1g@...> wrote:
You can't go wrong with a Simpson Model 260 VOM.  Yes, it dates to the 1960' or '70's, but it's a well-built meter that will serve you nicely for years.  It uses batteries for ohms measurements, so you'll need to replace them about every 18 months.  You can find Simpson 260 meters on Ebay for $US 50 or less.  No semiconductors inside, just resistors.  I've had mine since 1970 and couldn't do basic V, O, or M measurements without it.  Buy a set of good test leads and you're all set forever.
--
Jon Titus, KZ1G
Herriman, UT USA

ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...>
 

Simpson 260 there are many  variations of that model all woth it and easy to get repaired.
The biggest advantage is measuring current, the old analog meters have less voltage drop.

Another is the Triplite 630 that looks almost the same also very good.  I have one that
was unmolested and near perfect.  Handy instrument.  I also use a fluke-77 digital.

Other brands include Avo, some of the bigger face meters from known test
equipment makers.

Allison

Dexter N Muir
 

Not common in NZ, but George (he of Amateurlogic/Ham College and Ham Nation) recommends it.
73 de ZL2DEX :)

MVS Sarma
 

A great multimeter designed by Simpson in 1960s. I had a chance to buy two of them for telecom training center's needs in India.

Tominaz
 

The simpson requires a 30 volt battery that is generally not available, expensive when found. I have 10 3 volt cells in mine, so consider that expense. The voltage and current work fine without it but no ohms. JUST SAYING


On Sat, Jun 16, 2018, 8:50 AM Mvs Sarma <mvssarma@...> wrote:
A great multimeter designed by Simpson in 1960s. I had a chance to buy two of them for telecom training center's needs in India.

Ralph Mowery
 

The Simpson 260 used several kinds of batteries over the years for the ohms function.  Often a D size for the lower ohm scale and a higher voltage one for the highest ohm scale..  Some odd ball ones by todays standards...Some more standard like several AA batteries and a 9 volt 'transistor' battery .  I think they were started around 1940, but know that by 1956 they were being produced in more or less the newer looking versions.

Here is a link to many manuals on them and probably how to calibrate them.


de ku4pt


On Sat, Jun 16, 2018 at 11:54 AM, Tominaz <tomfromphx@...> wrote:
The simpson requires a 30 volt battery that is generally not available, expensive when found. I have 10 3 volt cells in mine, so consider that expense. The voltage and current work fine without it but no ohms. JUST SAYING

On Sat, Jun 16, 2018, 8:50 AM Mvs Sarma <mvssarma@...> wrote:
A great multimeter designed by Simpson in 1960s. I had a chance to buy two of them for telecom training center's needs in India.
_

Gwen Patton
 

For VOM advice, I'd go look through the EEVBLOG forum's Test Equipment section. One of the first posts in there is a spreadsheet of 210 meters in 38 brands, and discussions of many more. And that's just one post. The EEVBLOG YouTube channel has many videos on the subject of meters, even head-to-head competitions between them at different price classes. Heck, Dave Jones, creator of EEVBLOG, has a couple of his own meters on the market. I'd love to try one of his, someday, just to see how it compares with my Fluke.

This should give you some options, and perhaps some input on what the problems you need to be aware of are or could be.

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/multimeter-spreadsheet/
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=eevblog+multimeter