Topics

Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw

Braden Glett <bradenglett@...>
 

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation?
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM

Gordon Gibby
 

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation?
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM

Buddy Brannan
 

Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation?
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM

Daniel Conklin
 

A while ago I built a 4SQRP group HiPerMite CW filter in a mint tin to put between my headphones/speaker and my receivers.  There are others out there, but this one is a proven performer and I'm very happy with it.  http://www.4sqrp.com/hipermite.php
Dan, W2DLC

Gordon Gibby
 

​I actually sorta like a wider bandwidth, unless I have a really interfering signal.


A couple decades ago I remember actually building a LC audio filter --- toroids & capacitors and maybe even a vacuum tube!!!   to run a headset.   I may even still have the thing.


Nowadays it is ducksoup to put something like that together with all the integrated circuits and I think I seem them advertized all over.    


Narrower than 500 hz makes my head hurt!


Cheers -- to each his own!!!!!


gordon



From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:04 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation?
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM

Jerry Gaffke
 

The uBitx works well enough as a CW rig out of the box if you have clean enough key contacts.

Here's an old post regarding possible enhancements:
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/36947

The stock uBitx firmware uses an ADC channel to listen to a straight key and two keyer paddle contacts
all over one wire, distinguishing between the three by a resistor network that gives each a different voltage.
That's been a bit problematic if the key or paddle has any dirt on the contacts, I'd recommend upgrading
the Raduino firmware to something else.  The firmware could use the PTT digital pin when in CW mode
as a straight key input.



On Mon, Apr 23, 2018 at 09:04 am, Buddy Brannan wrote:
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 
 
In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 
 
Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 
 
Vy 73, de KB5ELV
 

Buddy Brannan
 

Hey Gordon,

Agreed about the super duper narrow filters. With all of the ways to crank down the bandwidth and peak the audio and reduce the noise and what not that are on my KX3, I rarely use much of that myself and, unless the bands are very crowded, open the receiver up some besides. Strange as it may sound, I find the background atmospheric noise soothing. Well, except maybe not so much the 80m static crashes. 

Now, after 30 years of being a ham, I’m interested in trying some kit building myself…it’s one aspect I feel like I’ve missed out on…especially now that I have a willing assistant :-) Still…being blind, these tiny parts make me a little nervous, and surface mount stuff is just right out. Anyway, think my YL and I can tackle a UBitx sometime soonish. 

Vy 73


On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:15 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

​I actually sorta like a wider bandwidth, unless I have a really interfering signal.

A couple decades ago I remember actually building a LC audio filter --- toroids & capacitors and maybe even a vacuum tube!!!   to run a headset.   I may even still have the thing.

Nowadays it is ducksoup to put something like that together with all the integrated circuits and I think I seem them advertized all over.    

Narrower than 500 hz makes my head hurt!

Cheers -- to each his own!!!!!

gordon


 
From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:04 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation? 
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM 


Gordon Gibby
 

​man, my hat is off  to you getting ANYTHING done with such impediments!   More power to you!!!!


If there isn't any statc---there's not much propagation either!!!


Gordon




From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:22 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Hey Gordon,

Agreed about the super duper narrow filters. With all of the ways to crank down the bandwidth and peak the audio and reduce the noise and what not that are on my KX3, I rarely use much of that myself and, unless the bands are very crowded, open the receiver up some besides. Strange as it may sound, I find the background atmospheric noise soothing. Well, except maybe not so much the 80m static crashes. 

Now, after 30 years of being a ham, I’m interested in trying some kit building myself…it’s one aspect I feel like I’ve missed out on…especially now that I have a willing assistant :-) Still…being blind, these tiny parts make me a little nervous, and surface mount stuff is just right out. Anyway, think my YL and I can tackle a UBitx sometime soonish. 

Vy 73


On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:15 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

​I actually sorta like a wider bandwidth, unless I have a really interfering signal.

A couple decades ago I remember actually building a LC audio filter --- toroids & capacitors and maybe even a vacuum tube!!!   to run a headset.   I may even still have the thing.

Nowadays it is ducksoup to put something like that together with all the integrated circuits and I think I seem them advertized all over.    

Narrower than 500 hz makes my head hurt!

Cheers -- to each his own!!!!!

gordon


 
From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:04 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation? 
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM 


Jack Purdum
 

Buddy:

There are some very interesting filters available in software where you can not only set the "center" frequency, but also the edges where the skirt "knees" are located. When I'm listening to code, I dial 'er down pretty tight as I find listening to the Big Bang during a CW session distracting rather than soothing. It all a matter of choice.

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, April 23, 2018, 12:22:30 PM EDT, Buddy Brannan <buddy@...> wrote:


Hey Gordon,

Agreed about the super duper narrow filters. With all of the ways to crank down the bandwidth and peak the audio and reduce the noise and what not that are on my KX3, I rarely use much of that myself and, unless the bands are very crowded, open the receiver up some besides. Strange as it may sound, I find the background atmospheric noise soothing. Well, except maybe not so much the 80m static crashes. 

Now, after 30 years of being a ham, I’m interested in trying some kit building myself…it’s one aspect I feel like I’ve missed out on…especially now that I have a willing assistant :-) Still…being blind, these tiny parts make me a little nervous, and surface mount stuff is just right out. Anyway, think my YL and I can tackle a UBitx sometime soonish. 

Vy 73


On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:15 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

​I actually sorta like a wider bandwidth, unless I have a really interfering signal.

A couple decades ago I remember actually building a LC audio filter --- toroids & capacitors and maybe even a vacuum tube!!!   to run a headset.   I may even still have the thing.

Nowadays it is ducksoup to put something like that together with all the integrated circuits and I think I seem them advertized all over.    

Narrower than 500 hz makes my head hurt!

Cheers -- to each his own!!!!!

gordon


 
From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:04 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation? 
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM 


Buddy Brannan
 

All true. 

As for impairments…blindness is, paradoxically, no big deal and also not for wimps :-) And ham radio has been great in a lot of respects, including in travel to other states and other countries. It kept my sanity when in Ukraine for five weeks adopting my daughter in 2004, when we were literally locked in because the adoption guy had no idea what else to do with us. The KX1 was a great travel companion back then, though obviously not a lot of great contacts with just a wire tossed out a 6th story apartment and another counterpoise lying across the floor. Still helped with not climbing the walls. 

Getting hf station back on the air, after not being very active for theist couple years, so maybe will see you on the bands sometime. Am about 90% cw, usually with a straight key or bug. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:32 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

​man, my hat is off  to you getting ANYTHING done with such impediments!   More power to you!!!!

If there isn't any statc---there's not much propagation either!!!

Gordon



From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:22 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Hey Gordon,

Agreed about the super duper narrow filters. With all of the ways to crank down the bandwidth and peak the audio and reduce the noise and what not that are on my KX3, I rarely use much of that myself and, unless the bands are very crowded, open the receiver up some besides. Strange as it may sound, I find the background atmospheric noise soothing. Well, except maybe not so much the 80m static crashes. 

Now, after 30 years of being a ham, I’m interested in trying some kit building myself…it’s one aspect I feel like I’ve missed out on…especially now that I have a willing assistant :-) Still…being blind, these tiny parts make me a little nervous, and surface mount stuff is just right out. Anyway, think my YL and I can tackle a UBitx sometime soonish. 

Vy 73


On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:15 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

​I actually sorta like a wider bandwidth, unless I have a really interfering signal.

A couple decades ago I remember actually building a LC audio filter --- toroids & capacitors and maybe even a vacuum tube!!!   to run a headset.   I may even still have the thing.

Nowadays it is ducksoup to put something like that together with all the integrated circuits and I think I seem them advertized all over.    

Narrower than 500 hz makes my head hurt!

Cheers -- to each his own!!!!!

gordon


  
From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:04 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation? 
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM 



Chris Clarke G3SQU
 

Brady

The uBITx is never going to be a serious CW contest rig, but I imagine you are not expecting that.

I only operate CW, never more than 20W. Having installed the KD8KEC v1.061 firmware to deal with keying issues, and when combined with a good audio filter, I am very happy operating CW with the uBITx. I am straight key only so it would be good to hear from some paddle-key operators. I use a W3NQN passive LC audio CW filter built from a kit many years ago and sadly not available at present, but there are now many analogue and digital filter options out there to try. I am about to try the SOTAbeams Laserbeam digital audio filter, which comes with great reviews.

When I first assembled my uBITx I reported to my local club that it wasn't a viable CW rig. However, I now enjoy CW operating with my upgraded uBITx, especially as I've been able to customise the software. Last weekend I spent some time working CW in the YU and MM DX contests on the 40m and 20m bands (with my NorCal Doublet antenna). Whilst 47 contacts from on-off operating over the 2 days doesn't break any records, I had an enjoyable time hunting them down when I did go on the air. Significantly, I don't think I'd have done any better with my TenTec 579 (a nice very analog CW rig) running QRP and I much prefer operating the uBITx rather than my YouKits EK-1B or IC-703 QRP rigs because of the customisation I've been able to achieve.

The great strength of the uBITx is that provides a really good basis for experimentation and development, as well as operation, at a bargain price and I'm finding it is a real education when allied to all the support you can get from this Group. It is a true ham's rig and is fine for CW, with an audio filter, once the stock firmware has been upgraded. I am also very happy that I've had an introduction to programming the Arduino, something I'd been thinking about for years but had never taken the step.

Hope this helps.

73 Chris
G3SQU

KB2HSH
 

I have been using my uBITX exclusively on CW for the last couple weeks. After getting used to the idiosyncrasies of the radio, and using KD8CEC v 1.061, it's actually quite a CAPABLE CW rig. Whether its making SKCC group contacts, working Special Event stations (got the Titanic SE in one call), or general rag-chewing, the uBITX is a great radio.

KB2HSH
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I put a SotaBeams DSP Audio Filter into my BITX40 and it works great.  I have a 2nd one that I intend to use for my uBITX.
If you don't want to fuss with installing it in the rig you can get an enclosure for the filter and use it externally on different rigs.
These filters outperform any active audio filter I have ever used. 

https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/dual-bandwidth-filter-modules-ssb-cw/

There is also a small circuit board that is available from QRP Guys for the W0EB uBITX CW conditioning adaptor.
This helps to make the CW keying more reliable. 

https://qrpguys.com/ubitx-cw-conditioning-adapter

Cheers
Michael VE3WMB


David Wilcox
 

A great CW filter is the CALF sold by John, KC9ON, at 
https://kc9on.com/.  You can use his stock set up or experiment with different variables if you are an audio nerd and the cost is very reasonable.  I have 3 or 4 different filters but his is my GoTo filter most of the time.

Dave K8WPE

On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:36 PM, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Buddy:

There are some very interesting filters available in software where you can not only set the "center" frequency, but also the edges where the skirt "knees" are located. When I'm listening to code, I dial 'er down pretty tight as I find listening to the Big Bang during a CW session distracting rather than soothing. It all a matter of choice.

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, April 23, 2018, 12:22:30 PM EDT, Buddy Brannan <buddy@...> wrote:


Hey Gordon,

Agreed about the super duper narrow filters. With all of the ways to crank down the bandwidth and peak the audio and reduce the noise and what not that are on my KX3, I rarely use much of that myself and, unless the bands are very crowded, open the receiver up some besides. Strange as it may sound, I find the background atmospheric noise soothing. Well, except maybe not so much the 80m static crashes. 

Now, after 30 years of being a ham, I’m interested in trying some kit building myself…it’s one aspect I feel like I’ve missed out on…especially now that I have a willing assistant :-) Still…being blind, these tiny parts make me a little nervous, and surface mount stuff is just right out. Anyway, think my YL and I can tackle a UBitx sometime soonish. 

Vy 73


On Apr 23, 2018, at 12:15 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

​I actually sorta like a wider bandwidth, unless I have a really interfering signal.

A couple decades ago I remember actually building a LC audio filter --- toroids & capacitors and maybe even a vacuum tube!!!   to run a headset.   I may even still have the thing.

Nowadays it is ducksoup to put something like that together with all the integrated circuits and I think I seem them advertized all over.    

Narrower than 500 hz makes my head hurt!

Cheers -- to each his own!!!!!

gordon


 
From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Buddy Brannan <buddy@...>
Sent: Monday, April 23, 2018 12:04 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw
 
Ehhh! Listening to cw with a 2.someKHz filter is good for you! It will hone your cw listening skills and let you learn to pick the right signal out :-) 

In all seriousness, Gordon’s suggestion of an audio filter is a good one. While it’s not really the same as a filter in the receiver, they’re pretty good…or can be…and certainly can be very effective. I reckon that a DSP-based filter would be a bit beyond the capability of the Arduino. Also probably not exactly cost effective as compared to the rest of the radio. 

Do remember this is a really low-cost radio, and you probably won’t get Icom performance, or probably not even Xiegu performance, out of it, though I’m sure what you will get will be pretty decent…especially given how popular the rig seems to be. 

Vy 73, de KB5ELV

On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:53 AM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Just add an audio filter to achieve whatever bandwidth you prefer would be my suggestion




On Apr 23, 2018, at 11:50, Braden Glett <bradenglett@...> wrote:

I've heard that the ubitx doesn't work very well for CW due to being too wide in the receiving end. How are some of you correcting this? Particularly, how can someone who can handle a soldering iron but is not an electronics whiz, adapt the ubitx for practical CW operation? 
Thanks and 73
Brady KD8ZM 


Braden Glett <bradenglett@...>
 

Thanks Chris - sounds like you operate a lot like I do, low power CW 99% of the time. Encouraging.

Bob KB1TEK
 

QRP guys also have a couple nice little filters for use with CW, both a low pass and band pass.

https://qrpguys.com/simple-cw-scaf-filter
https://qrpguys.com/qrpguys-active-600hz-audio-filter

I haven't used either of these, but their kit quality and instructions are very good.  I've used both keyer and EFHW tuner kits with great success.

73,
Bob

Dan Pflugrath
 

I have a CW filter from New England QRP the NESCAF switched capacitor audio filter. Mine works great with the uBITX and others have had good success as well.  It lets you very both center frequency and the bandwidth.  Mine will go from a bandwidth of about 1.5 kHz down to about 80 Hz. In many cases it helps eliminate some of the higher frequency audio noise for SSB operation.    

Chris Clarke G3SQU
 

CW 99.99% of time  ... now where did I put that mic ...