Date   
Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Jerry Gaffke
 

A tool like git is great if you have a bunch of programmers collaborating on a project.
Especially if they all understand how to use git.
Here's a tutorial on git, there's a tool tip when mouse hovering over the cartoon.
    https://explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/1597:_Git
The diff command is much easier to master than git.

I don't have much use for git or cvs or whatever when working on small home projects.
I just copy my work into sequentially numbered *.txt files or zip archives, which are ignored by the Arduino IDE
For example, at the command line under linux:   
    cd ~/blinky
    zip blinky43.zip *.ino *.c *.h

And if I really cared about my blinky project, I'd occasionally copy that out to a USB stick.
Or onto a 9 track 1600 bpi tape.

I've been doing it this way since long before cvs or git was created.
Though I did switch from tar to zip when forced to work under MSDOS in the 1980's.

I usually have a revision history at the top of the main file in the project so I know where stuff changes. 
Here's how it's done under git:  https://xkcd.com/1296/

Jerry, KE7ER



On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 07:37 am, Jack Purdum wrote:
For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory.

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

W2CTX
 

I second this approach. I have been developing software for 40 years and have never

used a cvs.


I recommend "meld" tool for comparing files. It runs on linux and windows.


rOn

On April 24, 2018 at 11:26 AM "Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io" <jgaffke@...> wrote:

A tool like git is great if you have a bunch of programmers collaborating on a project.
Especially if they all understand how to use git.
Here's a tutorial on git, there's a tool tip when mouse hovering over the cartoon.
    https://explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/1597:_Git
The diff command is much easier to master than git.

I don't have much use for git or cvs or whatever when working on small home projects.
I just copy my work into sequentially numbered *.txt files or zip archives, which are ignored by the Arduino IDE
For example, at the command line under linux:   
    cd ~/blinky
    zip blinky43.zip *.ino *.c *.h

And if I really cared about my blinky project, I'd occasionally copy that out to a USB stick.
Or onto a 9 track 1600 bpi tape.

I've been doing it this way since long before cvs or git was created.
Though I did switch from tar to zip when forced to work under MSDOS in the 1980's.

I usually have a revision history at the top of the main file in the project so I know where stuff changes. 
Here's how it's done under git:  https://xkcd.com/1296/

Jerry, KE7ER



On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 07:37 am, Jack Purdum wrote:
For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory.

Re: Teensy 3.5/3.6 upgrade for uBITX

Kees T
 

Jack,

Is the official unveiling at FDIM 2018 since you are a presenter ? You certainly have stirred up interest with the "Jackal board". 
I see Hans Summers will also be presenting. Hope the Austin QRP group is well represented since Milt Cram, W8NUE, said he could not attend this year.

73 Kees K5BCQ

uBitX and Foundation Licence

flyingorthopod
 

Hi all
I've just got a UK Foundation Licence.
The rules say I have to use a kit or radio which complies with regulation IR2028 (here)
which is a seriously vague document that deals with band plans.
Anybody know if uBitX complies with IR2028 and is legal?
thanks

Re: UBITX Assemly Wiki Page #ubitx

Joe Puma
 

Nice work 



On Apr 23, 2018, at 3:18 AM, W7PEA <patrick@...> wrote:

I started some rough notes on an assembly page right here on the group we can all update and maintain:
https://groups.io/g/BITX20/wiki/UBITX-Assembly

.. I'll do another round on it (its late) but feel free to make corrections, edits, or suggestions on this thread.

Thanks!
W7PEA - Patrick

Re: Teensy 3.5/3.6 upgrade for uBITX

Gary Anderson
 

I'm guilty of joining in and further corrupting this thread with non Teensy focused ideas. My apologies.
Taking Kees' input to heart, I will start a new Protoneer thread where we can work on the Protoneer as an incremental enhancement.
Regards,
Gary
AG5TX

Re: Teensy 3.5/3.6 upgrade for uBITX

Kees T
 

Is this now approaching the mcHF QRP Transceiver ?

73 Kees K5BCQ

Re: Teensy 3.5/3.6 upgrade for uBITX

Jack, W8TEE
 

When this all started out, there was no "target date". However, when I was asked to speak at FDIM, I said it would be kinda cool to show it off at the "Homebrew Show-and-tell" Friday night (8-10PM), so the target became real. Al (AC8GY) and I are starting to look like slugs who haven't seen daylight in about six months. Still, JackAl should be a fun board for a lot of people because its heart is the Teensy 3.6 which has lots of resources associated with it. Currently, we are using less than 10% of both flash and SRAM.

Aw crap! I just looked at the lineup of speakers. I was hoping to go before Hans and Michael on the hope that attendee content expectations would be low!

Hope to see a bunch of you there...

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 12:27:31 PM EDT, Kees T <windy10605@...> wrote:


Jack,

Is the official unveiling at FDIM 2018 since you are a presenter ? You certainly have stirred up interest with the "Jackal board". 
I see Hans Summers will also be presenting. Hope the Austin QRP group is well represented since Milt Cram, W8NUE, said he could not attend this year.

73 Kees K5BCQ

Re: Teensy 3.5/3.6 upgrade for uBITX

Ken
 

Hi Jack

What;'s this all about, the  Jackal board?

73

Ken VA3ABN

On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 12:45 PM, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:
When this all started out, there was no "target date". However, when I was asked to speak at FDIM, I said it would be kinda cool to show it off at the "Homebrew Show-and-tell" Friday night (8-10PM), so the target became real. Al (AC8GY) and I are starting to look like slugs who haven't seen daylight in about six months. Still, JackAl should be a fun board for a lot of people because its heart is the Teensy 3.6 which has lots of resources associated with it. Currently, we are using less than 10% of both flash and SRAM.

Aw crap! I just looked at the lineup of speakers. I was hoping to go before Hans and Michael on the hope that attendee content expectations would be low!

Hope to see a bunch of you there...

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 12:27:31 PM EDT, Kees T <windy10605@...> wrote:


Jack,

Is the official unveiling at FDIM 2018 since you are a presenter ? You certainly have stirred up interest with the "Jackal board". 
I see Hans Summers will also be presenting. Hope the Austin QRP group is well represented since Milt Cram, W8NUE, said he could not attend this year.

73 Kees K5BCQ


Protoneer Nano-Arm #ubitx

Gary Anderson
 

Protoneer has a NANO-ARM board offering for $10 + $5 (US) shipping.
This may be a viable low cost pin compatible upgrade to the nano board on the Radunio with a direct board swap out.
This will give more headroom for coding +more features and still work in the Arduino IDE environment.

https://wiki.protoneer.co.nz/NANO-ARM

The NANO-ARM has the following features:

  • Runs at 48MHz (Atmel SAMD21)
  • 256KB FLASH Memory
  • 32KB RAM
  • Pin compatible with Arduino Nano but runs at 3.3V
  • SAMD21 micro-controller same as used on a Arduino Zero's.
  • Built in USB
  • Arduino Zero bootloader pre-loaded.
  • 20 I/O pins with 5 extra pins that can be used for I2C/SPI or I/O
  • 6 Analog Pins(ADC) with 12-bit resolution (4096 resolution point vs Arduino Uno's 1024)
  • 1 Digital to Analog(DAC) pin with 10-bit resolution.
  • Designed and Manufacture in New Zealand

Re: Teensy 3.5/3.6 upgrade for uBITX

Jack, W8TEE
 

We don't have the SDR components, but we picked the Teensy 3.6 because of its horsepower, good FFT library, and audio processing board. Al's doing an info piece on JackAl which should answer most questions about it in an effort not to chew up this group's bandwidth. He will likely have it sent out here today. It will also have a special email address for any questions that result.

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 12:40:22 PM EDT, Kees T <windy10605@...> wrote:


Is this now approaching the mcHF QRP Transceiver ?

73 Kees K5BCQ

Re: Protoneer Nano-Arm #ubitx

Kim gross
 

That sounds like a very good solution for a simple upgrade.  



On 4/24/2018 11:10 AM, Gary Anderson wrote:
Protoneer has a NANO-ARM board offering for $10 + $5 (US) shipping.
This may be a viable low cost pin compatible upgrade to the nano board on the Radunio with a direct board swap out.
This will give more headroom for coding +more features and still work in the Arduino IDE environment.

https://wiki.protoneer.co.nz/NANO-ARM

The NANO-ARM has the following features:

  • Runs at 48MHz (Atmel SAMD21)
  • 256KB FLASH Memory
  • 32KB RAM
  • Pin compatible with Arduino Nano but runs at 3.3V
  • SAMD21 micro-controller same as used on a Arduino Zero's.
  • Built in USB
  • Arduino Zero bootloader pre-loaded.
  • 20 I/O pins with 5 extra pins that can be used for I2C/SPI or I/O
  • 6 Analog Pins(ADC) with 12-bit resolution (4096 resolution point vs Arduino Uno's 1024)
  • 1 Digital to Analog(DAC) pin with 10-bit resolution.
  • Designed and Manufacture in New Zealand

Re: Protoneer Nano-Arm #ubitx

W2CTX
 

I ordered one yesterday but there seems to be a long delivery time?


rOn

On April 24, 2018 at 1:23 PM Kim gross <kgross@...> wrote:

That sounds like a very good solution for a simple upgrade.  



On 4/24/2018 11:10 AM, Gary Anderson wrote:
Protoneer has a NANO-ARM board offering for $10 + $5 (US) shipping.
This may be a viable low cost pin compatible upgrade to the nano board on the Radunio with a direct board swap out.
This will give more headroom for coding +more features and still work in the Arduino IDE environment.

https://wiki.protoneer.co.nz/NANO-ARM

The NANO-ARM has the following features:

  • Runs at 48MHz (Atmel SAMD21)
  • 256KB FLASH Memory
  • 32KB RAM
  • Pin compatible with Arduino Nano but runs at 3.3V
  • SAMD21 micro-controller same as used on a Arduino Zero's.
  • Built in USB
  • Arduino Zero bootloader pre-loaded.
  • 20 I/O pins with 5 extra pins that can be used for I2C/SPI or I/O
  • 6 Analog Pins(ADC) with 12-bit resolution (4096 resolution point vs Arduino Uno's 1024)
  • 1 Digital to Analog(DAC) pin with 10-bit resolution.
  • Designed and Manufacture in New Zealand


 

Re: UBITX Assemly Wiki Page #ubitx

Jonathan
 

Bob,

The reason I was asking about the "N/C" notation on the sockets is that I recall some discussion of how to wire the sockets to avoid problems when you plug in a (audio-style) jack that is mono (only tip and barrel, no extra area for left/right).   My guess is that "N/C" means no connection.  However, sometimes the line between them was dotted and some are solid (all marked with N/C).   So I was confused...   It would be good if someone could clear that up.

Thanks

-Jonathan

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Rod Davis
 

 Hi All,

The latest KD8CEC firmware manual (1.073) gives  click-by-click
instructions for downloading from github.

You do not have to know a thing about github to use it; just follow the steps.

Many thanks to Jon,KK6VLO for contributing text and graphics to that
section of the manual.

Go to http:ubitx.net, Mike ZL1AXGs excellent website to get the manual.

Rod KM6SN


On 04/24/2018 07:56 AM, Gordon Gibby wrote:
All the world is a market.

Meet the needs of your customers and your move a lot of product.

Try to tell your customers “what they need to do, “ and they may find another vendor.

Trick here is to figure out how to make it easy on multiple types of customers.

that might require you storing your files 2 different ways, but that’s extra work for only ONE person, and benefits tens to hundreds to thousands.






On Apr 24, 2018, at 10:37, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Karl:

You're probably right on the 3 types. However, the statement:

You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that.

needs a little wiggle room. If someone just wants to add a splash screen with their call, that's a change, but I don't think they need version control to do it. The problem is implementation: at what point do you transition from casual programmer to software developer? I think there are a lot of "add-a-splash-screen" programmers who are sticking their toes into the programming ocean for the first time. I think that's great...it's a fun element of our hobby! Of course, the danger is that wigglie toes in an ocean can attract attention from some mean-spirited creatures and some cautions need to then be put in place to safeguard the code. I just don't know where that line is drawn.

For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory. Using my earlier example, I would have:

   C://IanLee/Version106/ubix_20.ino...
              /Version1072/ubix_20.ino
              /WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubix_20.ino...
              /Backup/WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubitx_20.ino  // and the rest of the files

Notice how Backup is really a mirror of the WorkingVersion directory. As long as I back up at the end of each day, my worst case is I lose one day's work. I'm not as religious about this as I should be, which a real VC would enforce, but it works for me now.

In the end, it's up to the user to decide what's needed. The true value of VC only comes clearly into focus when something really bad happens and six months worth of work disappears.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 8:59:11 AM EDT, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:


Jack, 

I think we are dealign with three types of users:

1) The "Give me a simple way to flash uBitx, and I don't care about version numbers, I don't care about changes, I just want to use the latest and greatest features" user. For them, a version number is not important, because they very likely don't even want to keep more than one version around. They would very likely be happy with just using avrdude and flashing a hex file, which Ian provides. 

2) The "I want to experiment with the software and make my own changes, but always want a save way to get back to a working configuration" type of user. For them, just like learning the syntax of C/C++ and how the library system in the Arduino IDE works, it may be a good idea to get a basic understanding of a version control system and use that to keep track of changes. You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that. 

3) The "I want to have access to different versions, but don't want to learn how software development actually works" type. For them, your approach may be a good way to keep track of different versions.  

Especially if you fall into #2, and you want to make changes, you need a way to figure out what you've changed. When you hack away on a keyboard, mistakes happen and you may not even remember touching a file. A version control system always will tell you exactly what has changed, and then you can figure out how to get back to a working system. So, in m opinion if you want to make changes, you either need to be very good with the Unix diff command, or have a VC system that takes care of that for you. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

p.s to Re: [BITX20] KD8CEC 1.072 download

Rod Davis
 

 Hi All,

Please be aware on the github site where you select the version you want,
you will need to use your mouse wheel to scroll down to the most recent
versions.

Also, you to not have to "install github" on your computer. It is just
a straight download of a .zip file, can be done from any browser.

Rod KM6SN


On 04/24/2018 10:47 AM, Rod Davis wrote:

 Hi All,

The latest KD8CEC firmware manual (1.073) gives  click-by-click
instructions for downloading from github.

You do not have to know a thing about github to use it; just follow the steps.

Many thanks to Jon,KK6VLO for contributing text and graphics to that
section of the manual.

Go to http:ubitx.net, Mike ZL1AXGs excellent website to get the manual.

Rod KM6SN


On 04/24/2018 07:56 AM, Gordon Gibby wrote:
All the world is a market.

Meet the needs of your customers and your move a lot of product.

Try to tell your customers “what they need to do, “ and they may find another vendor.

Trick here is to figure out how to make it easy on multiple types of customers.

that might require you storing your files 2 different ways, but that’s extra work for only ONE person, and benefits tens to hundreds to thousands.






On Apr 24, 2018, at 10:37, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Karl:

You're probably right on the 3 types. However, the statement:

You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that.

needs a little wiggle room. If someone just wants to add a splash screen with their call, that's a change, but I don't think they need version control to do it. The problem is implementation: at what point do you transition from casual programmer to software developer? I think there are a lot of "add-a-splash-screen" programmers who are sticking their toes into the programming ocean for the first time. I think that's great...it's a fun element of our hobby! Of course, the danger is that wigglie toes in an ocean can attract attention from some mean-spirited creatures and some cautions need to then be put in place to safeguard the code. I just don't know where that line is drawn.

For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory. Using my earlier example, I would have:

   C://IanLee/Version106/ubix_20.ino...
              /Version1072/ubix_20.ino
              /WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubix_20.ino...
              /Backup/WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubitx_20.ino  // and the rest of the files

Notice how Backup is really a mirror of the WorkingVersion directory. As long as I back up at the end of each day, my worst case is I lose one day's work. I'm not as religious about this as I should be, which a real VC would enforce, but it works for me now.

In the end, it's up to the user to decide what's needed. The true value of VC only comes clearly into focus when something really bad happens and six months worth of work disappears.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 8:59:11 AM EDT, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:


Jack, 

I think we are dealign with three types of users:

1) The "Give me a simple way to flash uBitx, and I don't care about version numbers, I don't care about changes, I just want to use the latest and greatest features" user. For them, a version number is not important, because they very likely don't even want to keep more than one version around. They would very likely be happy with just using avrdude and flashing a hex file, which Ian provides. 

2) The "I want to experiment with the software and make my own changes, but always want a save way to get back to a working configuration" type of user. For them, just like learning the syntax of C/C++ and how the library system in the Arduino IDE works, it may be a good idea to get a basic understanding of a version control system and use that to keep track of changes. You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that. 

3) The "I want to have access to different versions, but don't want to learn how software development actually works" type. For them, your approach may be a good way to keep track of different versions.  

Especially if you fall into #2, and you want to make changes, you need a way to figure out what you've changed. When you hack away on a keyboard, mistakes happen and you may not even remember touching a file. A version control system always will tell you exactly what has changed, and then you can figure out how to get back to a working system. So, in m opinion if you want to make changes, you either need to be very good with the Unix diff command, or have a VC system that takes care of that for you. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK


Re: UBITX Assemly Wiki Page #ubitx

a.vision
 

Normally closed ?



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: Jonathan <jmcameron@...>
Date: 24/04/2018 18:44 (GMT+00:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] UBITX Assemly Wiki Page #ubitx

Bob,

The reason I was asking about the "N/C" notation on the sockets is that I recall some discussion of how to wire the sockets to avoid problems when you plug in a (audio-style) jack that is mono (only tip and barrel, no extra area for left/right).   My guess is that "N/C" means no connection.  However, sometimes the line between them was dotted and some are solid (all marked with N/C).   So I was confused...   It would be good if someone could clear that up.

Thanks

-Jonathan

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...>
 

Good marketing!




On Apr 24, 2018, at 13:47, Rod Davis <km6sn@...> wrote:

 Hi All,

The latest KD8CEC firmware manual (1.073) gives  click-by-click
instructions for downloading from github.

You do not have to know a thing about github to use it; just follow the steps.

Many thanks to Jon,KK6VLO for contributing text and graphics to that
section of the manual.

Go to http:ubitx.net, Mike ZL1AXGs excellent website to get the manual.

Rod KM6SN


On 04/24/2018 07:56 AM, Gordon Gibby wrote:
All the world is a market.

Meet the needs of your customers and your move a lot of product.

Try to tell your customers “what they need to do, “ and they may find another vendor.

Trick here is to figure out how to make it easy on multiple types of customers.

that might require you storing your files 2 different ways, but that’s extra work for only ONE person, and benefits tens to hundreds to thousands.






On Apr 24, 2018, at 10:37, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Karl:

You're probably right on the 3 types. However, the statement:

You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that.

needs a little wiggle room. If someone just wants to add a splash screen with their call, that's a change, but I don't think they need version control to do it. The problem is implementation: at what point do you transition from casual programmer to software developer? I think there are a lot of "add-a-splash-screen" programmers who are sticking their toes into the programming ocean for the first time. I think that's great...it's a fun element of our hobby! Of course, the danger is that wigglie toes in an ocean can attract attention from some mean-spirited creatures and some cautions need to then be put in place to safeguard the code. I just don't know where that line is drawn.

For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory. Using my earlier example, I would have:

   C://IanLee/Version106/ubix_20.ino...
              /Version1072/ubix_20.ino
              /WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubix_20.ino...
              /Backup/WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubitx_20.ino  // and the rest of the files

Notice how Backup is really a mirror of the WorkingVersion directory. As long as I back up at the end of each day, my worst case is I lose one day's work. I'm not as religious about this as I should be, which a real VC would enforce, but it works for me now.

In the end, it's up to the user to decide what's needed. The true value of VC only comes clearly into focus when something really bad happens and six months worth of work disappears.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 8:59:11 AM EDT, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:


Jack, 

I think we are dealign with three types of users:

1) The "Give me a simple way to flash uBitx, and I don't care about version numbers, I don't care about changes, I just want to use the latest and greatest features" user. For them, a version number is not important, because they very likely don't even want to keep more than one version around. They would very likely be happy with just using avrdude and flashing a hex file, which Ian provides. 

2) The "I want to experiment with the software and make my own changes, but always want a save way to get back to a working configuration" type of user. For them, just like learning the syntax of C/C++ and how the library system in the Arduino IDE works, it may be a good idea to get a basic understanding of a version control system and use that to keep track of changes. You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that. 

3) The "I want to have access to different versions, but don't want to learn how software development actually works" type. For them, your approach may be a good way to keep track of different versions.  

Especially if you fall into #2, and you want to make changes, you need a way to figure out what you've changed. When you hack away on a keyboard, mistakes happen and you may not even remember touching a file. A version control system always will tell you exactly what has changed, and then you can figure out how to get back to a working system. So, in m opinion if you want to make changes, you either need to be very good with the Unix diff command, or have a VC system that takes care of that for you. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: heat sink upgrade #bitx40 #parts

Skip Davis
 

The reason the Raduino regulator greats so hot is it has to dissipate the heat generated from in your case the 8.8 voltage drop across it. To cool it down you can insert a dropping resistor of about 56 ohms inline with the regulator input from pins 15 & 16 of the Raduino control board. Just cut the trace between those two points and solder in your resistor. You want to select a resistor value that will keep the voltage at the regulator input at about 7 vdc.


Skip Davis, NC9O 

On Apr 24, 2018, at 10:01, davesters@... wrote:

The part that gets hot on both of my bitx radios (40 and micro) is the power supply chip on arduino board. it gets too hot to touch. The PA only get slightly warm after an hour long phone qso. 

I had thin sheet of aluminum that bolted to the power regulator and it is markedly cooler. 

I have not set my radios up for digital 

Run radios both at 13.8v regulated.

Re: Low mic gain, was, show your mic

Arvo W0VRA
 

On Sun, Apr 22, 2018 at 07:57 pm, MAX wrote:
All of the correct information needs to be gathered in one place.
Have you seen ubitx.net ?  A lot of hard work went into aggregating the information generated here.