Date   
Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK
 

This is why Ian is using a version control system. As long as there are labels attached to each version, you can always go back and forward between versions without having to resort to different file names or different folders. As Ian explained, using different filenames actually breaks this mechanism. You may want to look into a Git tutorial to see how easy it is to - with just three or four commands you can do all that. All you need is to have Git installed on your system. 

To create a copy of the repository, you use this command (this assumes a Linux or other Unix type system - I don't know what the corresponding commands would be for Windows):

git clone https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx.git

You then go into the ubitx folder:

cd ubitx

From within this folder, you can list the tags that are available:

git tags

If you want to use the latest version, you are usually already all set, to go back to a previous version, you would use the checkout command:

git checkout v1.06

The argument you use (in this case "v1.06" is one of the tags that were listed with the "tags" command above).

You can always find out what's going on by using the "status" command:

git status

Especially if you want to make your own changes, Git is a great system, because you will always know what you've changed and you can keep track of your changes by creating your own branches and tags. 

This is how professional software development is done. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Gordon Gibby
 

Hmmmmm.   Interesting.... 


On Apr 24, 2018, at 08:24, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:

This is why Ian is using a version control system. As long as there are labels attached to each version, you can always go back and forward between versions without having to resort to different file names or different folders. As Ian explained, using different filenames actually breaks this mechanism. You may want to look into a Git tutorial to see how easy it is to - with just three or four commands you can do all that. All you need is to have Git installed on your system. 

To create a copy of the repository, you use this command (this assumes a Linux or other Unix type system - I don't know what the corresponding commands would be for Windows):

git clone https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx.git

You then go into the ubitx folder:

cd ubitx

From within this folder, you can list the tags that are available:

git tags

If you want to use the latest version, you are usually already all set, to go back to a previous version, you would use the checkout command:

git checkout v1.06

The argument you use (in this case "v1.06" is one of the tags that were listed with the "tags" command above).

You can always find out what's going on by using the "status" command:

git status

Especially if you want to make your own changes, Git is a great system, because you will always know what you've changed and you can keep track of your changes by creating your own branches and tags. 

This is how professional software development is done. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Gordon Gibby
 

But if this doesn’t work for windows users, the most common sort of us I suspect, exactly how does this benefit us?
The only Linux that I have available to me is a raspberry. I have plenty of those. Am I able to run the integrated development environment on raspberry?

On Apr 24, 2018, at 08:31, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Hmmmmm.   Interesting.... 


On Apr 24, 2018, at 08:24, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:

This is why Ian is using a version control system. As long as there are labels attached to each version, you can always go back and forward between versions without having to resort to different file names or different folders. As Ian explained, using different filenames actually breaks this mechanism. You may want to look into a Git tutorial to see how easy it is to - with just three or four commands you can do all that. All you need is to have Git installed on your system. 

To create a copy of the repository, you use this command (this assumes a Linux or other Unix type system - I don't know what the corresponding commands would be for Windows):

git clone https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx.git

You then go into the ubitx folder:

cd ubitx

From within this folder, you can list the tags that are available:

git tags

If you want to use the latest version, you are usually already all set, to go back to a previous version, you would use the checkout command:

git checkout v1.06

The argument you use (in this case "v1.06" is one of the tags that were listed with the "tags" command above).

You can always find out what's going on by using the "status" command:

git status

Especially if you want to make your own changes, Git is a great system, because you will always know what you've changed and you can keep track of your changes by creating your own branches and tags. 

This is how professional software development is done. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

W2CTX
 

Yes Git is a version control system, but not everyone is a software engineer!


I try to accommodate the people who will be trying to use my software.


rOn

On April 24, 2018 at 8:24 AM "Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK" <khk@...> wrote:

This is why Ian is using a version control system. As long as there are labels attached to each version, you can always go back and forward between versions without having to resort to different file names or different folders. As Ian explained, using different filenames actually breaks this mechanism. You may want to look into a Git tutorial to see how easy it is to - with just three or four commands you can do all that. All you need is to have Git installed on your system. 

To create a copy of the repository, you use this command (this assumes a Linux or other Unix type system - I don't know what the corresponding commands would be for Windows):

git clone https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx.git

You then go into the ubitx folder:

cd ubitx

From within this folder, you can list the tags that are available:

git tags

If you want to use the latest version, you are usually already all set, to go back to a previous version, you would use the checkout command:

git checkout v1.06

The argument you use (in this case "v1.06" is one of the tags that were listed with the "tags" command above).

You can always find out what's going on by using the "status" command:

git status

Especially if you want to make your own changes, Git is a great system, because you will always know what you've changed and you can keep track of your changes by creating your own branches and tags. 

This is how professional software development is done. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Jack Purdum
 

Karl:

I've used version control (VC) systems on everything from a PC to a full-blown mainframe running VMS. That said, most Arduino users probably see VC as an unnecessary layer to negotiate each time a new release comes out...they are not in a commercial software development environment. What I've done with Ian's releases is to create new subdirectories for each release:

    C://IanLee/Version106/ubix_20.ino...
              /Version1072/ubix_20.ino
              /WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubix_20.ino...

and so on. I then have a "working directory" (i.e., the WorkingVersion above) that holds the most recent version which is copied from the latest subdirectory. I can then traverse to this working directory from within the IDE, click on the INO file and off I go. This also allows me to return to the "original state" of the code should the need arise, but without a VC system. True, I lose the intermediate steps that got me from point 'A' to point 'M', but for most users, they don't care anyway as long as the original is preserved.

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 8:24:10 AM EDT, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:


This is why Ian is using a version control system. As long as there are labels attached to each version, you can always go back and forward between versions without having to resort to different file names or different folders. As Ian explained, using different filenames actually breaks this mechanism. You may want to look into a Git tutorial to see how easy it is to - with just three or four commands you can do all that. All you need is to have Git installed on your system. 

To create a copy of the repository, you use this command (this assumes a Linux or other Unix type system - I don't know what the corresponding commands would be for Windows):

git clone https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx.git

You then go into the ubitx folder:

cd ubitx

From within this folder, you can list the tags that are available:

git tags

If you want to use the latest version, you are usually already all set, to go back to a previous version, you would use the checkout command:

git checkout v1.06

The argument you use (in this case "v1.06" is one of the tags that were listed with the "tags" command above).

You can always find out what's going on by using the "status" command:

git status

Especially if you want to make your own changes, Git is a great system, because you will always know what you've changed and you can keep track of your changes by creating your own branches and tags. 

This is how professional software development is done. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK
 

I did not say that it would not work for Windows, I said that I do not know what the corresponding commands are on Windows - changes are that they are the same (or very close), but without any first hand experience, I would not want to spread any misinformation. Git is available for Windows, but you may want to read a Windows specific tutorial. 
--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Gordon Gibby
 

Well I appreciate that, but this is not the only thing I do in life. I’m involved in several other activities both in radio and elsewhere, and writing books left and right, and I don’t have time to read tutorials on every little system. If you can’t make it easy, you will lose people like me.



On Apr 24, 2018, at 08:42, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:

I did not say that it would not work for Windows, I said that I do not know what the corresponding commands are on Windows - changes are that they are the same (or very close), but without any first hand experience, I would not want to spread any misinformation. Git is available for Windows, but you may want to read a Windows specific tutorial. 
--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK
 

Jack, 

I think we are dealign with three types of users:

1) The "Give me a simple way to flash uBitx, and I don't care about version numbers, I don't care about changes, I just want to use the latest and greatest features" user. For them, a version number is not important, because they very likely don't even want to keep more than one version around. They would very likely be happy with just using avrdude and flashing a hex file, which Ian provides. 

2) The "I want to experiment with the software and make my own changes, but always want a save way to get back to a working configuration" type of user. For them, just like learning the syntax of C/C++ and how the library system in the Arduino IDE works, it may be a good idea to get a basic understanding of a version control system and use that to keep track of changes. You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that. 

3) The "I want to have access to different versions, but don't want to learn how software development actually works" type. For them, your approach may be a good way to keep track of different versions.  

Especially if you fall into #2, and you want to make changes, you need a way to figure out what you've changed. When you hack away on a keyboard, mistakes happen and you may not even remember touching a file. A version control system always will tell you exactly what has changed, and then you can figure out how to get back to a working system. So, in m opinion if you want to make changes, you either need to be very good with the Unix diff command, or have a VC system that takes care of that for you. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

No PTT

geofftheasby@...
 

Hi all,

When I tuned up my uBITX everything was fine. I have since been correcting the front panel wiring and now it does not transmit. The relays do not go over, there is only 1 volt on the PTT line (Orange) Although there is 5 volts across the straight key, nothing happens on 'key down'. I have checked the wiring several times, using W4RJP's circuit of 21st March (FB RJP!), there seem to be no bad joints, or burned components.  Can anyone advise where to try next, please?
Geoff G8BMI

Re: Poor Reception

Jay - WS4JM
 

Re-run the tune-up procedure for calibration to bring it back on frequency, find a good strong AM station with known frequency WWV is good, then run the BFO procedure, this should help. When you are off frequency that much your receive will suffer. Good luck

Jay WS4JM

Re: Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw

Braden Glett <bradenglett@...>
 

Thanks Chris - sounds like you operate a lot like I do, low power CW 99% of the time. Encouraging.

About to start my uBitX radio build...

Gerry Hull
 

Hey Folks,

About to start my uBitX build... have the radio now, and acquiring some parts as well as scouring my junkbox (which has been accumulating rather than shrinking!)

My goal is building a portable rig I can bring to do mountain-topping on HF as well as a bunch of VHF bands.

Adding transverters...

I've mentioned the low-cost transverters from Ukraine before (See eBay).   These units run from 20-30 bucks depending on the band, and will give you 5-8 watts output on each band (if you want to keep the spectrum clean.)  They can be driven with the drive before the uBitx finals.

I'm actually going to stuff 4 extra bands in the box -- 50,144, 222 and 432.    The four boards cost around $120 with shipping.

Some of the challenges are switching all this.   Since we are talking 10m as the 
i-f,  I think I'm going to use cheap DPDT relays typically found in those Chinese relay boards (I bought 100 of them for a song many years ago).  I have some nice 12v SMA low-power relays, but not going to waist them on 10m!

In order to control transverter I/O switching, I think I'll use a slave Nano via I2C.  I'll modify the KD8CEC sketches to have additional menu items to select the band; when 50, 144,222 or 432 is selected, I'll ensure the VFO displays the appropriate frequency (simply by adding the offset)  and, via the 2nd Nano, switch the UbitX finals off, and routes the low-level rf to the appropriate transverter. 

Sequencing...

With these transverters and the potential for external amplifiers, there is a need for
proper sequencing.   I'd also like it at HF as well (it can also be used to eliminate the pop when T/R switching between the uBitX 

I'll use the 2nd Nano to do this, using switching transistors and relays.   it will go something like this:

-PTT Closure
-Mute audio path via JFET switch
-Close transverter T/R relay contacts
-Wait 20mS +/-
-Close external amp relay contacts
-Wait 20mS +/-
-Close UBitX Original PTT

When PTT opens, the process is done in reverse.

Jacks and buffers, and RX/Mic processing...

I want to use the UbitX for FT8 and other digital modes, probably with an external laptop.

Rather than messing around with the mic input or speaker out, I think I'll add an emitter follower or OpAmp on both the mic audio channel and the receiver audio, before the audio pot.  This way, I'll have fixed level line-in and line-out (via RCA jacks)

 I plan on using my Yamaha CM-500 headsets with the rig.  Should be a good match since these use an electret mic.  They are a bit big for portable use, but very comfortable.    In addition, I ordered an SSM2167 mic preamp/compressor board for $6 on ebay.   

Though my uBitX has the new audio chip and is socketed, I'm going to replace the audio amp with the New England QRP Club's NESCAF project.  This is a switched capacitor filter-based CW filter board.   The filter has two controls: 1. the center frequency control allows the user to raise or lower the received frequency (the CW note) in the bandpass filter. The pitch can be set to a default value anywhere between 450-1000 Hz. range. 2. the bandwidth control will vary the width of the received CW pitch from about 90 Hz to about 1500 Hz.   It has a built-in audio amp.   It's a bit pricey at $39, but I thought I'd support a local club effort.

The back panel will get pretty busy.  The new connector compliment will include the following additional items:
4 more BNCs for the four transverter outputs.
5 more RCA jacks for HF/VHF/UHF amplifier keying

This reflector has been an awesome place for ideas!  Keep em flowing.

73, Gerry W1VE

Re: uBITX shipping time

William Cullison
 

Ordered March 29th and notified  by Paypal this morning. Why didn't I pony up for DHL? Oh well, at least it is on it's way

Re: heat sink upgrade #bitx40 #parts

_Dave_ K0MBT
 

The part that gets hot on both of my bitx radios (40 and micro) is the power supply chip on arduino board. it gets too hot to touch. The PA only get slightly warm after an hour long phone qso. 

I had thin sheet of aluminum that bolted to the power regulator and it is markedly cooler. 

I have not set my radios up for digital 

Run radios both at 13.8v regulated.

Re: Bitx20A bandspread

kc0wox Leeper
 

Charles:
A mv109 varactor is not the same as a mvam109. The mv109 ihas 26-32pfd capacitance and a mvam109 has 10-420pfd capacitance.
That would make a big difference in the tuning range.
Leonard

Re: Practical CW Operation? #ubitxcw

Bob KB1TEK
 

QRP guys also have a couple nice little filters for use with CW, both a low pass and band pass.

https://qrpguys.com/simple-cw-scaf-filter
https://qrpguys.com/qrpguys-active-600hz-audio-filter

I haven't used either of these, but their kit quality and instructions are very good.  I've used both keyer and EFHW tuner kits with great success.

73,
Bob

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Jack Purdum
 

Karl:

You're probably right on the 3 types. However, the statement:

You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that.

needs a little wiggle room. If someone just wants to add a splash screen with their call, that's a change, but I don't think they need version control to do it. The problem is implementation: at what point do you transition from casual programmer to software developer? I think there are a lot of "add-a-splash-screen" programmers who are sticking their toes into the programming ocean for the first time. I think that's great...it's a fun element of our hobby! Of course, the danger is that wigglie toes in an ocean can attract attention from some mean-spirited creatures and some cautions need to then be put in place to safeguard the code. I just don't know where that line is drawn.

For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory. Using my earlier example, I would have:

   C://IanLee/Version106/ubix_20.ino...
              /Version1072/ubix_20.ino
              /WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubix_20.ino...
              /Backup/WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubitx_20.ino  // and the rest of the files

Notice how Backup is really a mirror of the WorkingVersion directory. As long as I back up at the end of each day, my worst case is I lose one day's work. I'm not as religious about this as I should be, which a real VC would enforce, but it works for me now.

In the end, it's up to the user to decide what's needed. The true value of VC only comes clearly into focus when something really bad happens and six months worth of work disappears.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 8:59:11 AM EDT, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:


Jack, 

I think we are dealign with three types of users:

1) The "Give me a simple way to flash uBitx, and I don't care about version numbers, I don't care about changes, I just want to use the latest and greatest features" user. For them, a version number is not important, because they very likely don't even want to keep more than one version around. They would very likely be happy with just using avrdude and flashing a hex file, which Ian provides. 

2) The "I want to experiment with the software and make my own changes, but always want a save way to get back to a working configuration" type of user. For them, just like learning the syntax of C/C++ and how the library system in the Arduino IDE works, it may be a good idea to get a basic understanding of a version control system and use that to keep track of changes. You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that. 

3) The "I want to have access to different versions, but don't want to learn how software development actually works" type. For them, your approach may be a good way to keep track of different versions.  

Especially if you fall into #2, and you want to make changes, you need a way to figure out what you've changed. When you hack away on a keyboard, mistakes happen and you may not even remember touching a file. A version control system always will tell you exactly what has changed, and then you can figure out how to get back to a working system. So, in m opinion if you want to make changes, you either need to be very good with the Unix diff command, or have a VC system that takes care of that for you. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: KD8CEC 1.072 download

Gordon Gibby
 

All the world is a market.

Meet the needs of your customers and your move a lot of product.

Try to tell your customers “what they need to do, “ and they may find another vendor.

Trick here is to figure out how to make it easy on multiple types of customers.

that might require you storing your files 2 different ways, but that’s extra work for only ONE person, and benefits tens to hundreds to thousands.






On Apr 24, 2018, at 10:37, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Karl:

You're probably right on the 3 types. However, the statement:

You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that.

needs a little wiggle room. If someone just wants to add a splash screen with their call, that's a change, but I don't think they need version control to do it. The problem is implementation: at what point do you transition from casual programmer to software developer? I think there are a lot of "add-a-splash-screen" programmers who are sticking their toes into the programming ocean for the first time. I think that's great...it's a fun element of our hobby! Of course, the danger is that wigglie toes in an ocean can attract attention from some mean-spirited creatures and some cautions need to then be put in place to safeguard the code. I just don't know where that line is drawn.

For me, when I'm finished working for the day, I always make a back a copy of the current files into a Backup directory. Using my earlier example, I would have:

   C://IanLee/Version106/ubix_20.ino...
              /Version1072/ubix_20.ino
              /WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubix_20.ino...
              /Backup/WorkingVersion/ubix_20/ubitx_20.ino  // and the rest of the files

Notice how Backup is really a mirror of the WorkingVersion directory. As long as I back up at the end of each day, my worst case is I lose one day's work. I'm not as religious about this as I should be, which a real VC would enforce, but it works for me now.

In the end, it's up to the user to decide what's needed. The true value of VC only comes clearly into focus when something really bad happens and six months worth of work disappears.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 8:59:11 AM EDT, Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:


Jack, 

I think we are dealign with three types of users:

1) The "Give me a simple way to flash uBitx, and I don't care about version numbers, I don't care about changes, I just want to use the latest and greatest features" user. For them, a version number is not important, because they very likely don't even want to keep more than one version around. They would very likely be happy with just using avrdude and flashing a hex file, which Ian provides. 

2) The "I want to experiment with the software and make my own changes, but always want a save way to get back to a working configuration" type of user. For them, just like learning the syntax of C/C++ and how the library system in the Arduino IDE works, it may be a good idea to get a basic understanding of a version control system and use that to keep track of changes. You want to make changes to the software? Then you are a software developer, and version control is part of that. 

3) The "I want to have access to different versions, but don't want to learn how software development actually works" type. For them, your approach may be a good way to keep track of different versions.  

Especially if you fall into #2, and you want to make changes, you need a way to figure out what you've changed. When you hack away on a keyboard, mistakes happen and you may not even remember touching a file. A version control system always will tell you exactly what has changed, and then you can figure out how to get back to a working system. So, in m opinion if you want to make changes, you either need to be very good with the Unix diff command, or have a VC system that takes care of that for you. 

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: uBITX shipping time

João Ghignatti
 

-- Please, give-me an address for I buy a case for the uBITX20.



João Ghignatti - py3aii - GF49jx
Brazilian Ham Radio - ARRL Member
PORTO ALEGRE (RS) - B R A S I L
S30° 02.122´ <> W 51° 13.504
Powered by MOZILLA/THUNDERBIRD

Re: uBITX shipping time

chris gress <Chrisg0wfh@...>
 

I ordered mine 26th march and not a word that its shipped  :(


On Tue, 24 Apr 2018, 16:20 João Ghignatti, <py3aii@...> wrote:

-- Please, give-me an address for I buy a case for the uBITX20.



João Ghignatti -  py3aii - GF49jx
Brazilian Ham Radio - ARRL Member
PORTO ALEGRE (RS)  -  B R A S I L
S30°  02.122´    <>   W 51°  13.504
Powered  by   MOZILLA/THUNDERBIRD