Date   
Re: Dirt cheap uBitx case #ubitx

John Backo
 

Looks good.

It is always a challenge to fit a rig into a small space.

As Bill Schmidt says, watch out for stray RF. You may have to mount some
shielding (which is true of almost any ham and any rig). Hi. The easiest solution
is usually coax cable with included shielding. That probably should be
used for the three RF signals from the Raduino to the board anyway. Ground
the coax on the Raduino side, but NOT on the motherboard side. The cable
to the display can be wrapped with aluminum foil -- that is usually adequate.
Ground the foil on the Raduino side.

A good cable, if you can find it, is RG-48 with teflon insulation and 100%
shielding. It works well every time, and it is a bit smaller than regular RG-48.
It is a natural for smd connectors and GPS.

I wonder about the heat sinks. Perhaps you should drill 2 small holes
and tighten them against the case with long 4-40 screws. As long as the
IRF510's are isolated, the heat sink should be at ground, and the case is a
good place to anchor them. Every little bit helps. They can be tapped to
accommodate the screws so no nuts are needed...But nuts can be used as well.
Alternately, you could place a larger heat sink on the outside of the case
a la the method of Graham, VE3WGW. That kind of heat sink is easily found
as it is usually used in power inverters and voltage converters, especially
solar power units.

john
AD5YE

Re: #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc. #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

I think Gerald's complaint about USB sounding different than LSB winds up being due to
a USB signal going through the 45mhz filter a few khz away from where an LSB signal does. 
Gerald was using Ian's code which I have not yet looked over.
I assume Ian borrowed numbers from the original uBitx code.
Here's my argument:

The original uBitx code has the BFO at
    #define INIT_USB_FREQ   (11996500l)
and uses these frequencies for clk1:
    #define SECOND_OSC_USB (56995000l)
    #define SECOND_OSC_LSB (32995000l)

The 12mhz filter is passing audio between roughly 500 and 2500 hz in its upper sideband,
so the 12mhz filter is probably centered around 11996500 + (500+2500)/2 = 1199800 hz.

With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that upper sideband in the 45mhz filter
would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that lower sideband in the 45mhz filter
would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.

That's a 4khz difference in where the center of the sideband of interest got placed
within the 45mhz crystal filter passband. 

Assuming the the 45mhz crystal filter is truly centered at 44.995mhz as the notes in the code suggest,
then I figure that values of 56993000 hz and 32997000 hz should be optimal for clk1.

If the 45mhz crystal filter sweeps out to be somewhere else, then add the difference to those two figures.
For example, if the center is found to be at 44.997mhz (so 2khz higher) then the two figures for clk1
should be 56995000 hz and 32999000 hz.


Regarding Tim's writup:

> When you are talking about adjusting the BFO I assume you are talking about adjusting CLK1.

No, we are talking about adjusting the BFO.
When adjusting the BFO, we should move the VFO to get us back to the displayed frequency.
The display shows the frequency of the suppressed carrier, always easy enough to compute:
    For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
    For LSB, it's   VFO+(clk1-BFO) 
where VFO is clk2, and BFO is clk0.

RIT allows a different VFO setting on receive than transmit.
This IF-Shift thing apparently allows a different BFO setting (with attendant VFO correction) on receive than transmit.

So IF-Shift will change what part of the sideband the 12mhz filter will capture (and thus capture a different range of audio frequencies) 
but does not change the frequency of the suppressed carrier that we are tuned to.

CW is a bit different, but easy enough.

Jerry, KE7ER 

Re: RD16HHF1 power curve flattening...some

John Backo
 

Dan's has MPSH10's/ 12/$US3.00.

I have found he has generally good transistors,
mostly old stuff. These are Fairchild pieces.

I think BGMicro has some a while back...but they
are no longer advertising them, so they are out.


john
AD5YE

Re: RD16HHF1 power curve flattening...some

Glenn
 

Plenty of MPSH10's on eBay.

I used 0.25mm wire  on the toroids. Just what i had basically.

glenn
vk3pe

[uBiTx] last frequency memory?

Mike Hoddy
 

Hi all

When turning on the uBiTx it always defaults to 6.785 mHz irrespective of what frequency I was tuned to when turning off.  I'm guessing this is normal and if so is there a way of keeping the Raduino powered to default to the last frequency used?  So far I've built the BiTx40 and Ive two uBiTx to play with so plenty of scope!

73 de Mike, G0JXX

Re: uBITX Firmware CEC Version Added WSPR function, I am looking for a beta tester. #ubitx

Philip
 

Hello Ian.

Is the WSPR frequency calculator in uBITX manager working correctly. Or is the uBITX transmitting on the wrong side band ?.
I would like test the update when you have done it.

Philip G7JUR

Board won’t power up.

Bruce Anderson
 

I think my microBitx main board may be defective. When powered up (without the raduino attached), according to the wiring instructions, it only draws 60-80 micro amps, rather than 90-110 mA the instructions specify. I have checked twice that the sacrificial diode is installed correctly. 

Any ideas how to proceed?

Thanks,

Bruce W1BWA

Re: Board won’t power up.

 

Bruce,

Check on the uBitx board if you get the 12V power. Start first just below the power jack P1.
Sometimes these wires are crimped well and may not be making contact.

It is almost impossible to see uA unless something drastic wrong with P1 or your measurement! This has happened before.

Raj

At 11-03-18, you wrote:
I think my microBitx main board may be defective. When powered up (without the raduino attached), according to the wiring instructions, it only draws 60-80 micro amps, rather than 90-110 mA the instructions specify. I have checked twice that the sacrificial diode is installed correctly.

Any ideas how to proceed?

Thanks,

Bruce W1BWA

Re: [uBiTx] last frequency memory?

sulu82@...
 

I have the same problem.Mine defaults at 7.350.

Re: ubitx mount question regarding lcd display and bezel

Bert N8NN
 

Tom -- Very nice tuning knob!  Can you provide the part number and source?

Thanks, Bert N8NN

Re: Final implemented version of audio fix

_Dave_ K0MBT
 

My ubitx is still in production but I like your idea.

I wonder if the supply voltage could be limited with a resistor maybe a pot. At high power it would limit the voltage more also giving it a quasi AGC. 

Re: Board won’t power up.

 

Bruce,

Check the voltages with your -ve probe on the mother board. In case there is a ground fault in P1 or wire!

Raj

At 11-03-18, you wrote:
I think my microBitx main board may be defective. When powered up (without the raduino attached), according to the wiring instructions, it only draws 60-80 micro amps, rather than 90-110 mA the instructions specify. I have checked twice that the sacrificial diode is installed correctly.

Any ideas how to proceed?

Thanks,

Bruce W1BWA

Re: Board won’t power up.

 

Send me a photo preferably by whatsapp, email will take more response time.

At 11-03-18, you wrote:
I have checked twice that the sacrificial diode is installed correctly.

Re: Board won’t power up.

 

Ooops! the last couple of mails was men=ant to be private!

At 11-03-18, you wrote:
Send me a photo preferably by whatsapp, email will take more response time.

Re: #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc. #ubitx

Tim Gorman
 

Vince,

If you are listening to a CW signal then moving the IF Shift doesn't
change the tone of the CW signal at all. You are just moving the
passband. That can change the sound of a SSB signal because you are
removing some of the received audio along with the interfering signal.
Just like cutting the highs or lows with a treble/bass tone control.

tim ab0wr

On Sat, 10 Mar 2018 21:07:17 -0500
"Vince Vielhaber" <vev@...> wrote:

IF Shift is supposed to shift the signal thru the passband without
changing the frequency. So if you're listening to 3930 and there are
signals on 3928 (it happens daily) at the same time, you can use the
IF Shift to move the signals on 3928 out of the passband. If affects
the sound of the desired signal like a tone control but that's a side
effect of the action.

Vince.



On 03/10/2018 09:02 PM, Ronald Pfeiffer via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes I was confused a while back when Ian announced his IF shift.
The code looked just like our RIT. Our RIT displays the freq on
bottom line and the line above displays the plus/minus offset as
you move the encoder.

rOn



------------------------------------------------------------------------
*From:* Tim Gorman <tgorman2@...>
*To:* BITX20@groups.io
*Sent:* Saturday, March 10, 2018 8:24 PM
*Subject:* Re: [BITX20] #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc.

I wonder if we need to define some terms here. Passband tuning and
IF Shift typically move the *filter*, not the carrier. The carrier
will remained tuned to the same frequency when adjusting this. For
instance, if you use IF Shift when listening to a CW signal the
tone of the CW signal should not change. You can move the filter
bandwidth up or down to eliminate an interfering carrier that is
close to the desired frequency.

What you are describing is more like an Incremental Tuning, e.g.
RIT or XIT. When you move the BFO you move the carrier frequency,
not the filter bandwidth.

Ideally the BFO would be set to replicate the suppressed carrier
frequency. The filter then determines what is heard.

The ubitx uses a 12Mhz crystal filter. I don't know its bandwidth or
what the actual absolute frequencies are. I haven't had a chance to
run a spectrum analyzer against mine. Let's assume it has a 2400hz
bandwidth and goes from 12,000,300hz to 12,002,700hz.

If you want to listen to a signal at 10Mhz then CLK2 should be
tuned to 55Mhz to generate the 45Mhz signal the first IF needs.

CLK1 should then be set to generate a 12Mhz signal, i.e. 33Mhz. For
an USB signal we should then see frequencies of 12Mhz to 12.003Mhz
(or whatever the transmitted bandwidth is, e.g. 0-3000hz). You will
then see frequencies of 12.0003Mhz to 12.0027Mhz out of the filter.

This is how an ideal receiver would work.

When you are talking about adjusting the BFO I assume you are
talking about adjusting CLK1. If you adjust CLK1 to move the actual
suppressed carrier frequency somewhere else in the filter bandwidth
then your frequency indication is going to be off. What should be a
10Mhz signal is going to look like something else.

This will cause an asymmetric USB and LSB response and frequency
indication.

If you want to change the BFO frequency on the fly then it should be
understood as being an incremental tuning so you can remember what
the base frequency should be.

Now each filter is probably going to have a different actual
physical, absolute bandpass. The BFO will have to be adjusted to
allow for this but the frequency indication needs to be adjusted as
well to match. It should be a fixed reference, not a variable one.

Your transmitted frequency has to be offset from the CW-tone if it
is to be zero beat with the received signal. If it isn't then
you'll never be zero beat. I'm assuming that the CWL and CWU
frequencies are indicating a frequency CW-tone away from the actual
transmitting frequency. That may be because your receive BFO
frequency isn't set to indicate actual carrier frequency.

I didn't mean for this to get so complicated but it isn't an easy
subject.

tim ab0wr


On Sun, 11 Mar 2018 01:08:55 +0100
"ge_clipboard" <clipboard@... <mailto:clipboard@...>>
wrote:
Hi All

Many thanks for all the response concerning the BFO adjustement and
about using the IF-shift. I have been playing around with the BFO
setting while monitoring myself on another transceiver but as I’m
not getting there where I really would like to, I returned to the
factory settings. Leastening to the transmitted LSB and USB on
another transceiver was never symetric, maybe the steps to set the
bfo are not fine enough to do this or I am making something wrong.

Yes, the IF-shift is often a very helpfull feature within crowded
bands and as Mike pointed out, it is also nice to be able to adjust
the sound of a ssb signal on receive. So, if this could be
corrected in the software would be very fine.

Another point I’ve noticed today while using CW, dx-cluster and CAT
to jump to a anounced station... When the CWL-, CWU-feature is
enabled, then the frequency is not spot on but offset by the amount
of the CW-Tone.

Nevertheless, this little rig is a joy to play with, especially
with all the added features by Ian‘s software.

Vy 73, Gerald - HB9CEY




Re: #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc. #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

It was getting late when I pressed send, a couple minor errors crept in:

>  The 12mhz filter is passing audio between roughly 500 and 2500 hz in its upper sideband,
>  so the 12mhz filter is probably centered around 11996500 + (500+2500)/2 = 1199800 hz.
>
>  With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that upper sideband in the 45mhz filter
>  would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
>  With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that lower sideband in the 45mhz filter
>  would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.

When I say "upper sideband in the 45mhz filter", I'm talking about the upper sideband
of the original signal.   Should rewrite those last few lines with a few more words:

  With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that sideband within the 45mhz filter
  (now below the carrier due to sideband inversion from the high side VFO)
  would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
  With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that sideband within the 45mhz filter
  (now above the carrier due to sideband inversion from the high side VFO)
  would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.


And I flipped the arithmetic at the wrong spot in these formulas:

>  The display shows the frequency of the suppressed carrier, always easy enough to compute:
>      For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
>      For LSB, it's   VFO-(clk1+BFO) 

Those two formulas should read:
 
     For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
     For LSB, it's   VFO-(clk1+BFO) 


Jerry, KE7ER


On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 11:36 pm, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
I think Gerald's complaint about USB sounding different than LSB winds up being due to
a USB signal going through the 45mhz filter a few khz away from where an LSB signal does. 
Gerald was using Ian's code which I have not yet looked over.
I assume Ian borrowed numbers from the original uBitx code.
Here's my argument:

The original uBitx code has the BFO at
    #define INIT_USB_FREQ   (11996500l)
and uses these frequencies for clk1:
    #define SECOND_OSC_USB (56995000l)
    #define SECOND_OSC_LSB (32995000l)

The 12mhz filter is passing audio between roughly 500 and 2500 hz in its upper sideband,
so the 12mhz filter is probably centered around 11996500 + (500+2500)/2 = 1199800 hz.

With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that upper sideband in the 45mhz filter
would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that lower sideband in the 45mhz filter
would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.

That's a 4khz difference in where the center of the sideband of interest got placed
within the 45mhz crystal filter passband. 

Assuming the the 45mhz crystal filter is truly centered at 44.995mhz as the notes in the code suggest,
then I figure that values of 56993000 hz and 32997000 hz should be optimal for clk1.

If the 45mhz crystal filter sweeps out to be somewhere else, then add the difference to those two figures.
For example, if the center is found to be at 44.997mhz (so 2khz higher) then the two figures for clk1
should be 56995000 hz and 32999000 hz.


Regarding Tim's writup:

> When you are talking about adjusting the BFO I assume you are talking about adjusting CLK1.

No, we are talking about adjusting the BFO.
When adjusting the BFO, we should move the VFO to get us back to the displayed frequency.
The display shows the frequency of the suppressed carrier, always easy enough to compute:
    For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
    For LSB, it's   VFO+(clk1-BFO) 
where VFO is clk2, and BFO is clk0.

RIT allows a different VFO setting on receive than transmit.
This IF-Shift thing apparently allows a different BFO setting (with attendant VFO correction) on receive than transmit.

So IF-Shift will change what part of the sideband the 12mhz filter will capture (and thus capture a different range of audio frequencies) 
but does not change the frequency of the suppressed carrier that we are tuned to.

CW is a bit different, but easy enough.

Jerry, KE7ER 

Re: #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc. #ubitx

Rod Davis
 

Jerry,

 Huh? The formula correction at the bottom seems to be
no-change.  Is that what you meant?

Rod KM6SN


On 03/11/2018 07:43 AM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io wrote:
It was getting late when I pressed send, a couple minor errors crept in:

>  The 12mhz filter is passing audio between roughly 500 and 2500 hz in its upper sideband,
>  so the 12mhz filter is probably centered around 11996500 + (500+2500)/2 = 1199800 hz.
>
>  With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that upper sideband in the 45mhz filter
>  would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
>  With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that lower sideband in the 45mhz filter
>  would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.

When I say "upper sideband in the 45mhz filter", I'm talking about the upper sideband
of the original signal.   Should rewrite those last few lines with a few more words:

  With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that sideband within the 45mhz filter
  (now below the carrier due to sideband inversion from the high side VFO)
  would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
  With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that sideband within the 45mhz filter
  (now above the carrier due to sideband inversion from the high side VFO)
  would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.


And I flipped the arithmetic at the wrong spot in these formulas:

>  The display shows the frequency of the suppressed carrier, always easy enough to compute:
>      For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
>      For LSB, it's   VFO-(clk1+BFO) 

Those two formulas should read:
 
     For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
     For LSB, it's   VFO-(clk1+BFO) 


Jerry, KE7ER

On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 11:36 pm, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
I think Gerald's complaint about USB sounding different than LSB winds up being due to
a USB signal going through the 45mhz filter a few khz away from where an LSB signal does. 
Gerald was using Ian's code which I have not yet looked over.
I assume Ian borrowed numbers from the original uBitx code.
Here's my argument:

The original uBitx code has the BFO at
    #define INIT_USB_FREQ   (11996500l)
and uses these frequencies for clk1:
    #define SECOND_OSC_USB (56995000l)
    #define SECOND_OSC_LSB (32995000l)

The 12mhz filter is passing audio between roughly 500 and 2500 hz in its upper sideband,
so the 12mhz filter is probably centered around 11996500 + (500+2500)/2 = 1199800 hz.

With a clk1 for USB of 56995000 hz, the center of that upper sideband in the 45mhz filter
would be 56995000-11998000 = 44997000 hz
With clk1 for LSB of 32995000 hz, the center of that lower sideband in the 45mhz filter
would be 32995000+11998000 = 44993000 hz.

That's a 4khz difference in where the center of the sideband of interest got placed
within the 45mhz crystal filter passband. 

Assuming the the 45mhz crystal filter is truly centered at 44.995mhz as the notes in the code suggest,
then I figure that values of 56993000 hz and 32997000 hz should be optimal for clk1.

If the 45mhz crystal filter sweeps out to be somewhere else, then add the difference to those two figures.
For example, if the center is found to be at 44.997mhz (so 2khz higher) then the two figures for clk1
should be 56995000 hz and 32999000 hz.


Regarding Tim's writup:

> When you are talking about adjusting the BFO I assume you are talking about adjusting CLK1.

No, we are talking about adjusting the BFO.
When adjusting the BFO, we should move the VFO to get us back to the displayed frequency.
The display shows the frequency of the suppressed carrier, always easy enough to compute:
    For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
    For LSB, it's   VFO+(clk1-BFO) 
where VFO is clk2, and BFO is clk0.

RIT allows a different VFO setting on receive than transmit.
This IF-Shift thing apparently allows a different BFO setting (with attendant VFO correction) on receive than transmit.

So IF-Shift will change what part of the sideband the 12mhz filter will capture (and thus capture a different range of audio frequencies) 
but does not change the frequency of the suppressed carrier that we are tuned to.

CW is a bit different, but easy enough.

Jerry, KE7ER 

Re: Endian issues...final chapter

Jack, W8TEE
 

Totally agree when moving data between internet users. The downside is that binary 255 takes one byte but ASCII takes three bytes to push down a com link. If you are doing something computationally intensive, like moving FFT data to an SDR spectrum display, minimizing data transfer time can make a large performance difference. As Hans Summers (designer of the super-cool QCX transceiver from QRP Labs) pointed out, the endian issue must be handled even when writing to EEPROM on the same machine. You could store numeric data in EEPROM as ASCII, but then you need to pass through atoi() going into EEPROM and itoa() coming out. Clearly, Hans is storing his EEPROM data in binary.

CAT protocols like the one Ian Lee has worked on use an ASCII data transfer and it makes it so much easier to debug when something goes south. Even then, however, when commands can be as short as 10 bytes, someone reported a noticeable delay in response time. If you're only tool is a hammer, it should be no surprise that every problem looks like a nail. Binary versus ASCII protocols simply hangs a second tool on your belt. You need to decide which best solves your design problem.

Jack, W8TEE



From: Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2018 12:49 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Endian issues...final chapter

ietf solved this by insisting that internet protocos SHOULD be in plain text. it makes debuggera out our eyeballs and prevents testing of friendships.

On 11 Mar 2018 12:27 am, "Michael Hagen" <motdog@...> wrote:
If Push comes to Stack, who wins Big Injun or Little Injun?

On 3/10/2018 10:48 AM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io wrote:
We agree that  "Endianness is a problem when a binary file created on a computer is read on another computer with different endianness."

Where we seem to disagree is that I am convinced this code will always prints a value of "4"
regardless of whether the machine is big or little endian:

  long data32;    int  data8;
  data32 = 0x04030201;
  data8 = data32>>24;
  printf("%d \n", data8);

From this, we can create the endian agnostic code at the top of post 44018.  
Arv is correct, this is not something most of you need to worry about.
I'm totally done here.
Unless you want to talk about Gulliver's Travels.

Jerry


On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 08:42 am, Jack Purdum wrote:
   Endianness is a problem when a binary file created on a computer is read on another computer with different endianness.
 

-- 
Mike Hagen, WA6ISP
10917 Bryant Street
Yucaipa, Ca. 92399
(909) 918-0058
PayPal ID  "MotDog@..."
Mike@...



Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc. #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

Yes, the tone of the CW signal should not change if IF-Shift (and/or BFO-Adjust,
whatever you want to call it) is implemented correctly by changing both 
the BFO and the VFO as mentioned in post 44182.

The original uBitx code implemented BFO-Adjust by only moving the BFO,
so the CW tone did change, and SSB speech becomes unnatural/unintelligible.
I have no idea what the various new versions of the code do these days.

Moving clk1 as somebody suggested a few posts back won't work,
we must adjust the 12mhz BFO (equal to the incoming suppressed carrier)
relative to the 12mhz filter passband.
 
Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Mar 11, 2018 at 07:37 am, Tim Gorman wrote:
If you are listening to a CW signal then moving the IF Shift doesn't
change the tone of the CW signal at all. You are just moving the
passband. That can change the sound of a SSB signal because you are
removing some of the received audio along with the interfering signal.
Just like cutting the highs or lows with a treble/bass tone control.

Re: #uBITX Firmware KD8CEC - IF-Shift etc. #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

Good catch.
My excuse for last night was it was too late.
Now it's too early.

The original (and incorrect) formulas from post 44182 was this:
    For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
    For LSB, it's   VFO+(clk1-BFO) 

The correct formulas are the duplicated ones that you spotted:
     For USB, it's   VFO-(clk1-BFO)
     For LSB, it's   VFO-(clk1+BFO) 

Thanks,
Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Mar 11, 2018 at 07:57 am, Rod Self wrote:

Jerry,

 Huh? The formula correction at the bottom seems to be
no-change.  Is that what you meant?

Rod KM6SN