Date   
Re: 2N2222A getting super hot | Update

Joe Puma
 

Okay, thats fine, I could put them on order. So my heat is due to the the 11ohms 40+ma because the R92,95,86 need their resistors change to 1.5K. The current should come down some after thats down and the heat as well. 



Joe


On Mar 30, 2019, at 10:49 PM, Mark - N7EKU <n7eku@...> wrote:

Hi Joe,

Yes, just a typo in the Wiki.  It looks like you've got Q90 operating at a good level.

Didn't she just say in the last thread to aim for 20mA per transistor?  At over 40mA I think you are a bit over?

No problem to double up resistors.  It's what was recommended to get the 22ohm ones down to 11ohms.

R86 acts in two ways: one is to set the bias voltage on the base, the other is to provide some negative feedback.  If some inductance is added there, then as the frequency goes up the impedance goes up too so there will be less negative feedback at high frequencies.  This will help make up for the reduction in gain that happens to the transistor at higher frequencies.

So, you don't have to put the inductor in if you don't have it.  You could always order some and put one in later too.

73,


Mark.

Re: 2N2222A getting super hot | Update

 

Hi Joe,

Yes, just a typo in the Wiki.  It looks like you've got Q90 operating at a good level.

Didn't she just say in the last thread to aim for 20mA per transistor?  At over 40mA I think you are a bit over?

No problem to double up resistors.  It's what was recommended to get the 22ohm ones down to 11ohms.

R86 acts in two ways: one is to set the bias voltage on the base, the other is to provide some negative feedback.  If some inductance is added there, then as the frequency goes up the impedance goes up too so there will be less negative feedback at high frequencies.  This will help make up for the reduction in gain that happens to the transistor at higher frequencies.

So, you don't have to put the inductor in if you don't have it.  You could always order some and put one in later too.

73,


Mark.

Re: Simplest way to a working BITX30 #parts #bitx40help #calibration

Ashhar Farhan
 

10 mhz is problematic as the IF is quite close to the band.
On the BITX40, It would need a change of the bandpass filter, low pass filter and a few lines in the arduino code.
The bandpass filtering of 12 mhz IF breakthrough may not be sufficient w8th just a band pass filter (like the existing 7 mhz one), you may need to add a notch centered at 12 mhz. If the bandpass filtering is indeed sufficient, there should be no problem.
Do you have some test equipment at hand?
- f


On Sun 31 Mar, 2019, 2:44 AM Tom Paddrik, <paddriks@...> wrote:
I am interested in developing a very simple 30m only rig and antenna for digimode  use for HF APRS / Winlink /PSK Mail rig for my sailboat.
I'd much appreciate if some one could direct me on the best path to a bitx30. (e.g. should I buy bitx40 and modify?)
Thanks in advance!
Tom KP2CH 

Re: Sunil Case

Joe Puma
 

I think so, it doesn’t seems to be connected to earth ground of the radio. 

Joe


On Mar 30, 2019, at 8:10 PM, Sam Tedesco <stedesco619@...> wrote:

Thanks, Joe. Another question... Is the negative post on the smeter necessary??
 

Re: 2N2222A getting super hot | Update

Joe Puma
 

Actually I am not sure if 43ma is good on the emitter of the 2n2222a. I am looking at the spec and i am not sure what to look for.

IC Collector Current 0.6 A
ICM Collector Peak Current (tp < 5 ms) 0.8 A



As for pre-driver/drivers…

I am reading .47 V across the 11 ohms (42.73 ma)

Looks like I’m good there too. The only thing I didn't do for both stages is listed below. I don't have chokes and I would have to put two resistors in parallel for 1.5K. Is this change needed/required? This is probably my problem lol.




On Mar 30, 2019, at 10:23 PM, Joe Puma via Groups.Io <kd2nfc@...> wrote:

I just noticed there is an inconsistency from Allisons Wiki to what’s posted on ubitx.net



Replace Q90 with BFR106.  Note R81 has to be increased to between
2K and 2.7K for this part. (for those making suggestions I tried 2n2369 in
SMT, it was better but not great). Mouser has the BFR106 for a whopping 38 cents each.


Then on Allisons wiki it says

==================== first amp q90 ======================== 

Replace Q90 with BFR106.  (Mouser about 18cents each) . Reset bias of Q90 with BFR106 , Set bias for less than 10ma (r86 2.7K for mine).


R86 v R81

I am thinking R81 is correct. :) 


My R81 is what I changed to 2.55kohm and its voltage is 1.8V (.17ma) when I keyup.

and Emitter voltage is 1.1V keyed. 

.7v difference….the emitter/base difference is correct. 

So 1.1v on the emitter divided by the 100ohm R82  (11ma)

To set bias and measure simple measure across the devices emitter resistor voltage/resistance=current  so 100ohms with 1Volt is .01A or 10ma.


So I think I am in a good place with the biasing although I could drop it 1ma or more.


As for pre-driver/drivers…

I am reading .47 V across the 11 ohms (42.73 ma)

Looks like I’m good there too. The only thing I didn't do for both stages is listed below. I don't have chokes and I would have to put two resistors in parallel for 1.5K. Is this change needed/required? This is probably my problem lol.

R92, R95 replaced with 1.5K ohm.  (resets bias)

R86 replaced with 1.5K ohm in series with 2.7uh SMT choke.  (resets bias and adds peaking.)

Remove T9 and take one turn trifilar off of the 10.  Reinstal pay attention of lead placement.  IF available 6turns #28 trifilar on BN43-302 



Otherwise I feel comfortable that my currents are within range. I will work on the resistors and I just checked the inductors I got from eBay for L5, L7. There is a 2.2uH 1210 EPCOS.  If I could make due with that, I could use it for pre-driver as the wiki suggests. 


Joe
KD2NFC








On Mar 30, 2019, at 7:14 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Bravo!   I used to read the back of the Heathkit book to try to figure out what the heck was my radio doing

I think that’s where most of us learned electronics 

Read a bit on biasing a transistor, it is fascinating stuff.   And then how the cathode resistor acts like negative feedback—-oops, I meant emitter resistor....

This is where ham radio gets a lot more fun than just pushing on Mike Button



On Mar 30, 2019, at 18:07, Joe Puma <kd2nfc@...> wrote:

Thanks Gordon,

I have been making good progress. Using transistors as switches and now amplification either for audio or RF. The last year has taught me more then I ever learned in that tech school 30 years ago. We did learn OHM’s law and voltage law but I didn’t spend much time being hands on with it where I seem to learn from the best.  

As silly as it seems I guess I just didn’t know where to get current readings that bias the transistor or that I would even need to worry if I followed Allison’s steps, guess I was expecting the easy route 😔. This is where things get interesting because I am getting familiar with what the components are doing in the circuit. I’m still lost in certain areas like how the clock and mixer circuits work. 

I am about to sit down and take some readings from what I’ve leaned in this thread and I’m confident I can get the drivers running right. 


Joe
KD2NFC 




On Mar 30, 2019, at 4:46 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Joe, I was excited when I read that you were starting to figure this out!   Applying ohms law to the emitter resistor to figure out the current is a crucial skill.  


I know it’s embarrassing to us all, but this is just technician level ohms law.   It’s the same stuff that we teach and test on in the technician license; what is different is that it is inside a circuit and we never really realized that this cool Ohms law can help us measure a zillion things.

As I’m sure you are starting to realize, whatever voltage the base terminal ( of a common emmiter type amplifier) is at...... The emitter will be about .6 or .7 V lower.

And whatever that voltage is, drives current through the emitter resistor!!!!!!!!!   So once you know any part of this, you can kind of figure out how hot that transistor is going to get.   Allyson is telling you what the correct currents are, so now you just have to make the voltage divider on the base side cause all of this to work properly

Set that base voltage too high, and you’re going to have a really hot transistor because now the voltage across the emitter resistor is really high!   The amplifying action of the transistor will pull enough current through the collector to run that emitter right up to .7 V below the base..... and if that means 50 mA asked to flow, so be it!   Short-lived transistor!!!

The DC biasing of transistors is well worth getting a good handle on.  


I’m just starting a three or four part series in my local amateur radio emergency service group to teach common emitter amplifiers (or common cathode vacuum tube amplifiers)

I hope I did not bore you to tears

Gordon



On Mar 30, 2019, at 15:57, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:

Joe, it wasnt you.

There are a number of readers that do not write here and maybe read the emails.
So posting where he wiki is was needed as I get the feeling that anything posted 
more than a few days ago are lost to the wind for many that only interact via email.
Yet despite that it is preserved in the web based copy.

Allison 


Re: 2N2222A getting super hot | Update

Joe Puma
 

I just noticed there is an inconsistency from Allisons Wiki to what’s posted on ubitx.net



Replace Q90 with BFR106.  Note R81 has to be increased to between
2K and 2.7K for this part. (for those making suggestions I tried 2n2369 in
SMT, it was better but not great). Mouser has the BFR106 for a whopping 38 cents each.


Then on Allisons wiki it says

==================== first amp q90 ======================== 

Replace Q90 with BFR106.  (Mouser about 18cents each) . Reset bias of Q90 with BFR106 , Set bias for less than 10ma (r86 2.7K for mine).


R86 v R81

I am thinking R81 is correct. :) 


My R81 is what I changed to 2.55kohm and its voltage is 1.8V (.17ma) when I keyup.

and Emitter voltage is 1.1V keyed. 

.7v difference….the emitter/base difference is correct. 

So 1.1v on the emitter divided by the 100ohm R82  (11ma)

To set bias and measure simple measure across the devices emitter resistor voltage/resistance=current  so 100ohms with 1Volt is .01A or 10ma.


So I think I am in a good place with the biasing although I could drop it 1ma or more.


As for pre-driver/drivers…

I am reading .47 V across the 11 ohms (42.73 ma)

Looks like I’m good there too. The only thing I didn't do for both stages is listed below. I don't have chokes and I would have to put two resistors in parallel for 1.5K. Is this change needed/required? This is probably my problem lol.

R92, R95 replaced with 1.5K ohm.  (resets bias)

R86 replaced with 1.5K ohm in series with 2.7uh SMT choke.  (resets bias and adds peaking.)

Remove T9 and take one turn trifilar off of the 10.  Reinstal pay attention of lead placement.  IF available 6turns #28 trifilar on BN43-302 



Otherwise I feel comfortable that my currents are within range. I will work on the resistors and I just checked the inductors I got from eBay for L5, L7. There is a 2.2uH 1210 EPCOS.  If I could make due with that, I could use it for pre-driver as the wiki suggests. 


Joe
KD2NFC








On Mar 30, 2019, at 7:14 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Bravo!   I used to read the back of the Heathkit book to try to figure out what the heck was my radio doing

I think that’s where most of us learned electronics 

Read a bit on biasing a transistor, it is fascinating stuff.   And then how the cathode resistor acts like negative feedback—-oops, I meant emitter resistor....

This is where ham radio gets a lot more fun than just pushing on Mike Button



On Mar 30, 2019, at 18:07, Joe Puma <kd2nfc@...> wrote:

Thanks Gordon,

I have been making good progress. Using transistors as switches and now amplification either for audio or RF. The last year has taught me more then I ever learned in that tech school 30 years ago. We did learn OHM’s law and voltage law but I didn’t spend much time being hands on with it where I seem to learn from the best.  

As silly as it seems I guess I just didn’t know where to get current readings that bias the transistor or that I would even need to worry if I followed Allison’s steps, guess I was expecting the easy route 😔. This is where things get interesting because I am getting familiar with what the components are doing in the circuit. I’m still lost in certain areas like how the clock and mixer circuits work. 

I am about to sit down and take some readings from what I’ve leaned in this thread and I’m confident I can get the drivers running right. 


Joe
KD2NFC 




On Mar 30, 2019, at 4:46 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Joe, I was excited when I read that you were starting to figure this out!   Applying ohms law to the emitter resistor to figure out the current is a crucial skill.  


I know it’s embarrassing to us all, but this is just technician level ohms law.   It’s the same stuff that we teach and test on in the technician license; what is different is that it is inside a circuit and we never really realized that this cool Ohms law can help us measure a zillion things.

As I’m sure you are starting to realize, whatever voltage the base terminal ( of a common emmiter type amplifier) is at...... The emitter will be about .6 or .7 V lower.

And whatever that voltage is, drives current through the emitter resistor!!!!!!!!!   So once you know any part of this, you can kind of figure out how hot that transistor is going to get.   Allyson is telling you what the correct currents are, so now you just have to make the voltage divider on the base side cause all of this to work properly

Set that base voltage too high, and you’re going to have a really hot transistor because now the voltage across the emitter resistor is really high!   The amplifying action of the transistor will pull enough current through the collector to run that emitter right up to .7 V below the base..... and if that means 50 mA asked to flow, so be it!   Short-lived transistor!!!

The DC biasing of transistors is well worth getting a good handle on.  


I’m just starting a three or four part series in my local amateur radio emergency service group to teach common emitter amplifiers (or common cathode vacuum tube amplifiers)

I hope I did not bore you to tears

Gordon



On Mar 30, 2019, at 15:57, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:

Joe, it wasnt you.

There are a number of readers that do not write here and maybe read the emails.
So posting where he wiki is was needed as I get the feeling that anything posted
more than a few days ago are lost to the wind for many that only interact via email.
Yet despite that it is preserved in the web based copy.

Allison

Re: BITX Schematic

Wayne Leake
 

 I recall that there are a number of resistors that needed to be changed in the early verions, to keep things a bit cooler.
 I think it was the emitter to ground ones, like R12, R22, and so on.
 Depends on when it was made.
 I bought one just a bit before the Raduino came out, and I was able to buy the Raduino. With it came the resistors to change. I hesitate to do so myself, because it is way harder for me to work with the teeny weeny SMDs.
 There was a big discussion on one or more of the BITX facebook pages about it.
 The original value was changed to 2X the value, which cut down the current to keep things running cooler.
 I have the info on one of my drives, but it always takes me a while to find, as I changed my OS from Ubuntu to Linux Mint, so is on one of two other drives.
 Just thought I'd mention that, as it depends on the exact version you have.

Re: uBITX 4 Encoder

Doug Person <doug@...>
 

Thanks. I bought a few actually. Some from Amazon and a couple of these.  Thanks again.

Doug --KJ0F

On 3/30/2019 6:12 AM, Snowist wrote:
This one is from Digikey the decent one to order. No detent as the one came stock with the pack.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/bourns-inc/PEC11R-4020F-S0012/PEC11R-4020F-S0012-ND/4499651
-- 
73 de Doug -- KJ0F

Re: Shaking my head in disbelief....

Jim Tibbits
 

Speaking of audio filters....

Here's one I've been playing with ....Not sophisticated, but quick and easy ...Copied/adapted from this Note

Jim

Re: 2N2222A getting super hot

Adrian Chadd
 

... and thankyou for posting the wiki link. I actually went and put the calibration notes in there because it tripped me up!


-a


On Sat, 30 Mar 2019 at 12:57, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:
Joe, it wasnt you.

There are a number of readers that do not write here and maybe read the emails.
So posting where he wiki is was needed as I get the feeling that anything posted
more than a few days ago are lost to the wind for many that only interact via email.
Yet despite that it is preserved in the web based copy.

Allison

Re: Sunil Case

Sam Tedesco
 

Thanks, Joe!

Re: BITX Schematic

Paul KL7FLR
 

I saved this for my build.

 

Paul KL7FLR

Re: BITX Schematic

 

architectural  drawings at the office big boxes.

black and white and low res.

cheap.

I did a lot of those for classes.



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S®6 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: RCC WB5YYM <curtis03@...>
Date: 3/30/19 7:28 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] BITX Schematic

Its been a long time since I built the bitx40, but when I did, I saved the schematic to a file and sent that to a commercial printing company. I think I got 3 copies on huge paper for somewhere around 5 bucks.  So sorry I don't remember all the details. I'll try to dig through some of my old stuff and see if I can find one of these. I think the business was Fedex Office and Print center.

Re: BITX Schematic

RCC WB5YYM
 

Its been a long time since I built the bitx40, but when I did, I saved the schematic to a file and sent that to a commercial printing company. I think I got 3 copies on huge paper for somewhere around 5 bucks.  So sorry I don't remember all the details. I'll try to dig through some of my old stuff and see if I can find one of these. I think the business was Fedex Office and Print center.

Re: 2N2222A getting super hot

Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...>
 

Bravo!   I used to read the back of the Heathkit book to try to figure out what the heck was my radio doing

I think that’s where most of us learned electronics 

Read a bit on biasing a transistor, it is fascinating stuff.   And then how the cathode resistor acts like negative feedback—-oops, I meant emitter resistor....

This is where ham radio gets a lot more fun than just pushing on Mike Button



On Mar 30, 2019, at 18:07, Joe Puma <kd2nfc@...> wrote:

Thanks Gordon,

I have been making good progress. Using transistors as switches and now amplification either for audio or RF. The last year has taught me more then I ever learned in that tech school 30 years ago. We did learn OHM’s law and voltage law but I didn’t spend much time being hands on with it where I seem to learn from the best.  

As silly as it seems I guess I just didn’t know where to get current readings that bias the transistor or that I would even need to worry if I followed Allison’s steps, guess I was expecting the easy route 😔. This is where things get interesting because I am getting familiar with what the components are doing in the circuit. I’m still lost in certain areas like how the clock and mixer circuits work. 

I am about to sit down and take some readings from what I’ve leaned in this thread and I’m confident I can get the drivers running right. 


Joe
KD2NFC 




On Mar 30, 2019, at 4:46 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Joe, I was excited when I read that you were starting to figure this out!   Applying ohms law to the emitter resistor to figure out the current is a crucial skill.  


I know it’s embarrassing to us all, but this is just technician level ohms law.   It’s the same stuff that we teach and test on in the technician license; what is different is that it is inside a circuit and we never really realized that this cool Ohms law can help us measure a zillion things.

As I’m sure you are starting to realize, whatever voltage the base terminal ( of a common emmiter type amplifier) is at...... The emitter will be about .6 or .7 V lower.

And whatever that voltage is, drives current through the emitter resistor!!!!!!!!!   So once you know any part of this, you can kind of figure out how hot that transistor is going to get.   Allyson is telling you what the correct currents are, so now you just have to make the voltage divider on the base side cause all of this to work properly

Set that base voltage too high, and you’re going to have a really hot transistor because now the voltage across the emitter resistor is really high!   The amplifying action of the transistor will pull enough current through the collector to run that emitter right up to .7 V below the base..... and if that means 50 mA asked to flow, so be it!   Short-lived transistor!!!

The DC biasing of transistors is well worth getting a good handle on.  


I’m just starting a three or four part series in my local amateur radio emergency service group to teach common emitter amplifiers (or common cathode vacuum tube amplifiers)

I hope I did not bore you to tears

Gordon



On Mar 30, 2019, at 15:57, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:

Joe, it wasnt you.

There are a number of readers that do not write here and maybe read the emails.
So posting where he wiki is was needed as I get the feeling that anything posted
more than a few days ago are lost to the wind for many that only interact via email.
Yet despite that it is preserved in the web based copy.

Allison

Re: Shaking my head in disbelief....

Kelly Mabry
 

Ted, thanks for the great Information...

Here is an update on my progress..Now running CEC v5 firmware, and royally twisted up the bfo settings.  Thank God that I could do a factory reset via Dr. Lee's firmware. I restored my settings and saved myself great heartache. The Nextion display is working fine thanks to Oliver's recommendation . The calibration is almost set, within 300hz, and bfo sounds ok. A little high to add punch. Looking at the junk box for old microphones to use. I have all the parts for the standalone signal analyzer and have flashed the second nano. I need to reprogram the  ubitx with the right firmware to include the signal analyzer. 

Listened in on the contest this morning and I was happy with the progress made today.  Also, one leg of my windom was down, which is now fixed. Hmmph, storms! How dare they (lol).
Will be ready soon for some dummy load transmit testing.
It's coming together and the ubitx is growing on me by leaps and bounds. 
Heard a lot of Canada and also Paraguay on 20m. 
I fixed the volume control by ditching the 10k linear pot in favor of hfsignals.com volume control. Much better after I read the wiring mistake thread and wired it RIGHT. Sure wish I could get one with 1/4 inch shaft and no on/off. Anyone know a supplier and a part number?
Maybe I should a filmed myself building this, and sent it into America's Funny Video's.... 
73,
Kelly K5AID

BITX Schematic

RICHARD
 

Is there a schematic available for the Bitx40 radio that you can read ? The one on line is so more you can not read part numbers or values.
Thanks
K6KWQ

Re: Sunil Case

Joe Puma
 

I took pre-amp audio right before Pin 7 of the tda chip.  There is a cap near by. I don’t recall the number, I attached right there for audio in to the amp. For audio in on the AGC you can go from the other audio in connector on the amp and connect to the AGC. I think it was designed to link to the AGC. However, I took audio from the relay side of R70 as it drove the meter better as well as the Nextion S meter with LM385 I added to it. 


Joe
KD2NFC 


On Mar 30, 2019, at 4:52 PM, Sam Tedesco <stedesco619@...> wrote:

So, I just finished wiring up my ver3 board to sunil 3.5" nextion case. Have an audio line and agc line off (not sure where to connect). Plugged it in and popped the LA4225 on the audio amp. Took power off of audio and agc board and nextion/rig still work fine.

On top of that, where should I get audio in from the board for the audio amp and agc? Pics are from ver4 board.

Re: 2N2222A getting super hot

Joe Puma
 

Thanks Gordon,

I have been making good progress. Using transistors as switches and now amplification either for audio or RF. The last year has taught me more then I ever learned in that tech school 30 years ago. We did learn OHM’s law and voltage law but I didn’t spend much time being hands on with it where I seem to learn from the best.  

As silly as it seems I guess I just didn’t know where to get current readings that bias the transistor or that I would even need to worry if I followed Allison’s steps, guess I was expecting the easy route 😔. This is where things get interesting because I am getting familiar with what the components are doing in the circuit. I’m still lost in certain areas like how the clock and mixer circuits work. 

I am about to sit down and take some readings from what I’ve leaned in this thread and I’m confident I can get the drivers running right. 


Joe
KD2NFC 




On Mar 30, 2019, at 4:46 PM, Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...> wrote:

Joe, I was excited when I read that you were starting to figure this out!   Applying ohms law to the emitter resistor to figure out the current is a crucial skill.  


I know it’s embarrassing to us all, but this is just technician level ohms law.   It’s the same stuff that we teach and test on in the technician license; what is different is that it is inside a circuit and we never really realized that this cool Ohms law can help us measure a zillion things.

As I’m sure you are starting to realize, whatever voltage the base terminal ( of a common emmiter type amplifier) is at...... The emitter will be about .6 or .7 V lower.

And whatever that voltage is, drives current through the emitter resistor!!!!!!!!!   So once you know any part of this, you can kind of figure out how hot that transistor is going to get.   Allyson is telling you what the correct currents are, so now you just have to make the voltage divider on the base side cause all of this to work properly

Set that base voltage too high, and you’re going to have a really hot transistor because now the voltage across the emitter resistor is really high!   The amplifying action of the transistor will pull enough current through the collector to run that emitter right up to .7 V below the base..... and if that means 50 mA asked to flow, so be it!   Short-lived transistor!!!

The DC biasing of transistors is well worth getting a good handle on.  


I’m just starting a three or four part series in my local amateur radio emergency service group to teach common emitter amplifiers (or common cathode vacuum tube amplifiers)

I hope I did not bore you to tears

Gordon



On Mar 30, 2019, at 15:57, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:

Joe, it wasnt you.

There are a number of readers that do not write here and maybe read the emails.
So posting where he wiki is was needed as I get the feeling that anything posted
more than a few days ago are lost to the wind for many that only interact via email.
Yet despite that it is preserved in the web based copy.

Allison

Simplest way to a working BITX30 #parts #bitx40help #calibration

Tom Paddrik
 

I am interested in developing a very simple 30m only rig and antenna for digimode  use for HF APRS / Winlink /PSK Mail rig for my sailboat.
I'd much appreciate if some one could direct me on the best path to a bitx30. (e.g. should I buy bitx40 and modify?)
Thanks in advance!
Tom KP2CH