Date   
Re: uBitx V3 low power continues

MVS Sarma
 

Ted,
as and when time permits  take a photo of the Post PA  LPF sections. you would locate the LPF covering 40m band.
 check the turns of coils L17, L18 and l19.
Cross check with ft37-43 core on site calculator   at kits and parts. you will find that it  might be having additional turns.
   we can remove coils from top itself   no need to pull board out. try to tweak the coils by reducing and measuring, if possible.
 The power on 40m would come up.
secondly,
 perhaps one could try increasing the  local VFO , intermediate and BFO osc levels. by manipulating the code in si5351 firmware.
 they are set at 2mA by defining 1, 1, 1  for clocks 0, 1 and 2
we can perhaps try with 2, 2, 2 instead.

 notice that on v5 the designer had made it 3, 3, 3

 we can always restore them to old levels by a click of button on arduino ide.

all the best for a speedy recovery from spinal issues.

 sarma vu3zmv



On Thu, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:13 AM Ted via Groups.Io <k3rta=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
This is a follow-up to another thread that is months old. I'm now recovering from cervical spine surgery & attendant complications of infection, so I've had time to repeat tests though not necessarily any clearer mind. Having only 15-20 degrees of rotation of my neck isn't helping, either, with bench work.

To review: a perfectly-functioning radio with typical RF out levels (12w out in 80, 10w in 40, 8w on 20, etc) has devolved to less than a watt on CW on all bands and even less on SSB. The exception is 20 meters, where a couple of watts in CW show up.

Let us assume the finals are fine and that all drivers and pre-drivers are OK. They all get warm, in fact. Suggestions were made to trace the RF thru the LPF array to ensure power wasn't being eaten by a stuck relay or bad filter. I think that this possibility has been eliminated, though I can't explain why the finals get warm and yet the output generally stinks AND worse on one mode than on another.

Again, the SSB signal is far below the CW/dead carrier level, perhaps it is 25-30% of carrier level (according to my oscillscope).  Output at the antenna connection shows approximately the same level as measured at the final transistors.

What dies, prior to Q90, that kills SSB and CW as described?   My sledge hammer works just fine and requires little skill to operate - and at this point makes a better communication tool than my uBitx. I'm not allowed to pick up 15 lbs, though, so that option is on standby. I just don't get it. 


Thanks,

Ted   K3RTA

Re: Project to adapt ubitx for the visually challenged

Buddy Brannan
 

Howdy,

I’m another blind op and longtime lurker. I’ve chatted with a couple different folks about this (Hi Jim), but I’ve not really had a lot of time to pursue it or, for that matter, many other ham radio pursuits of late. I’d be really pleased with a morse readout myself, but there have been discussions around voice synthesis with keypads as an offshoot of sorts to some of the add-on designs that have been done with touch screens. Those discussions were months ago for me, and, sadly, I haven’t had time to pursue, and I haven’t bought a kit with which to pursue these things either, although I’ve gotten at least one offer of assistance when that time comes to pick it up.

Given that a lot of blind people are on fixed (read low) incomes and the UBitx is a really neat low-cost solution, I’m sure there would be interest beyond myself and this other fella.

Vy 73,


Buddy Brannan, KB5ELV - Erie, PA
Email: buddy@...
Mobile: (814) 431-0962

On Oct 31, 2019, at 11:39 PM, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:

I have been in touch with someone who is a potential ubitx user. He needs a cw read out of the frequency, etc. It should be an easy one to add. I am pasting his email below. It came toy other email inbox.
Are there any volunteers for this?

Hello Ashhar Farhan:

Thank you for the nice reply.

It has taken me some time in putting this response together. Much sol
full and creative thought has gone in to the response. The below
should get the U-Bit-X community thought processes started. Please
pass this on to the U-Bit-X community. Not sure when I will join the
group.

My plans are to obtain an U-Bit-X rig and join the user group. I
wonder if a functioning, already built used U-Bit-X rig might be a
good first starter. May be someone in the community might know of one
to be purchase. Sorry for any delay.

As a person who is blind, many product videos are not much benefit to
me. This is due to these videos want the viewer to read the product
screen when prompts and information are displayed. This is their
normal demonstration means rather than showing and reading the display
at the same time.

If the products being demonstrated would talked like an Apple
I/Pad/Phone/Pod/ with Voice Over turned on, then the product would be
self explaining. This gives me a creative wondering could the U-Bit-X
be control by an Apple I/Product? This would be via a direct cable
connection. Between both devices.

The following are my thoughts on the U-Bit-X CW Speaking of the
Display. It starts with propose new menu choices. Within each new menu
choice, it should describe the needed ability. See my comments at the
end.

Add the following new menu features:

Turn On Auto CW speaking Of The Display.
When this feature is turned on:
After the tuning knob stopped being turned and a delay of CW seconds
times out,
the menu feature or frequency is read via CW.

CW seconds time out value
This is a menu choice where you specify the time out value for the
Auto CW reading.
Example: 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75 seconds.
Suggest the default of 0.75 seconds

Turn On Manual CW reading Of The Display.
When this feature is turned on:
Single tap of the tuning knob
the menu feature or frequency is read via CW.
Note, when this feature is turned on:
Double tap of the tuning knob will bring up the menus or other features.

Double Tap Value
Some individuals may need a longer spacing for double tapping. I have
right hand trauma from being a back seat passenger in an auto
accident. The trauma was to my right hand which I use for reading
Braille and sending CW. I have no recommended starting value.

Tuning Clicks
When this feature is turned on:
As you turn the tuning knob up or down in frequency,
single audible click for every one KHZ,
double audible click for every 10 KHZ, and
triple audible click for every 50 KHZ is heard.
With menus, a click for every menu choice stopped on or pass over.
If the user knows the starting point via CW reading, they can keep
track by counting the clicks.

CW Flushing
When this feature is turned on:
While the menu information or frequency being read,
tap the tuning knob, pushing the microphone button or pressing the CW
key will stop the CW reading. When pressing the microphone button or
using the CW key will flush CW reading and begin transmitting.
With this feature turned off:
all voice transmitting and CW sending is disabled until CW reading is
completed.
When off, CW reading is only stopped when going between menu and frequency.

Receiver mute
When this feature is turned on:
The receiver audio is muted when CW reading is occurring.
When this feature is turned off:
The receiver volume is cut in half while CW reading is occurring.

CW Speed
This is where you set the CW speed for the menu or frequency to be read.

CW Spacing
This is where you specify any additional spacing between CW characters
to be read. This is for persons who like their CW characters sent at a
fast speed like 15 words per minute. But, character spacing delay
increase for a total reading speed of 7 words per minute.

CW Character Volume
This is where you set the volume for CW reading.

CW Tone
This is where you set the frequency tone for CW reading.

Comments:

It is so easy to provide just frequency read out via CW. Blind fold
yourself and try to eat a meal, run a vacuum sweeper, wash walls, use
a microwave oven, cook on the stove, use a cell phone, use a computer,
use all abilities of the U-Bit-X, Etc.

To make full use of the U-Bit-X for person who are blind, all display
abilities need to be outputted via some form of CW reading.
Abbreviated words might work in some situations. Examples, RX -
receiver, TX - transmitter, V A - vfo A, V B - VFO B, A VOX - anti
vox, G VOX - vox gaine, D VOX - vox delay, S VOX - vox sensativity,
ETC.

For those of you who are writing the CW reading code, make sure to
blindfold yourself when testing out this new feature. Then I look
forward to the results of your effort.

I can be reached at this <wd8ajq@...> email address.
Also, I am on Echo Link.
73 Dave WD8AJQ

Project to adapt ubitx for the visually challenged

Ashhar Farhan
 

I have been in touch with someone who is a potential ubitx user. He needs a cw read out of the frequency, etc. It should be an easy one to add. I am pasting his email below. It came toy other email inbox.
Are there any volunteers for this?

Hello Ashhar Farhan:

Thank you for the nice reply.

It has taken me some time in putting this response together. Much sol
full and creative thought has gone in to the response. The below
should get the U-Bit-X community thought processes started. Please
pass this on to the U-Bit-X community. Not sure when I will join the
group.

My plans are to obtain an U-Bit-X rig and join the user group. I
wonder if a  functioning, already built used U-Bit-X rig might be a
good first starter. May be someone in the community might know of one
to be purchase. Sorry for any delay.

As a person who is blind, many product videos are not much benefit to
me. This is due to these videos  want the viewer to read the product
screen when prompts and information are displayed. This is their
normal demonstration means rather than showing and reading the display
at the same time.

If the products being demonstrated would talked like an Apple
I/Pad/Phone/Pod/ with Voice Over turned on, then the product would be
self explaining.  This gives me a creative wondering could the U-Bit-X
be control by an Apple I/Product? This would be  via a direct cable
connection.  Between both devices.

The following are my thoughts on the U-Bit-X CW Speaking of the
Display. It starts with propose new menu choices. Within each new menu
choice, it should describe the needed ability. See my comments at the
end.

Add the following new menu features:

Turn On Auto CW speaking Of The Display.
When this feature is turned on:
After the tuning knob stopped being turned and a delay of CW  seconds
times out,
the menu feature or frequency is read via CW.

CW  seconds time out value
This is a menu choice where you specify the time out value for the
Auto CW reading.
Example: 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75 seconds.
Suggest the default of 0.75 seconds

Turn On Manual CW reading Of The Display.
When this feature is turned on:
Single tap of the tuning knob
the menu feature or frequency is read via CW.
Note, when this feature is turned on:
 Double tap of the tuning knob will bring up the menus or other features.

Double Tap Value
Some individuals may need a longer spacing for double tapping. I have
right hand trauma from being a back seat passenger in an auto
accident. The trauma was to my right hand which I use for reading
Braille and sending CW. I have no recommended starting value.

Tuning Clicks
When this feature is turned on:
As you turn the tuning knob up or down in frequency,
single audible click for every one KHZ,
double audible click for every 10 KHZ, and
triple audible click for every 50 KHZ is heard.
With menus, a click for every menu choice stopped  on or pass over.
If the user knows the starting point via CW reading, they can keep
track by counting the clicks.

CW Flushing
When this feature is turned on:
While the menu information or frequency being read,
tap the tuning knob, pushing the microphone button or pressing the CW
key will stop the CW reading. When pressing the microphone button or
using the CW key will flush CW reading  and begin transmitting.
With this feature turned off:
 all voice transmitting and CW sending is disabled until CW reading is
completed.
When off, CW reading is only stopped when going between menu and frequency.

Receiver mute
When this feature is turned on:
The receiver audio is muted when CW reading is occurring.
When this feature is turned off:
The receiver volume is cut in half while CW reading is occurring.

CW Speed
This is where you set the CW speed for the menu or frequency to be read.

CW Spacing
This is where you specify any additional spacing between CW characters
to be read. This is for persons who like their CW characters sent at a
fast speed like 15 words per minute. But, character  spacing delay
increase for a total reading speed of 7 words per minute.

CW Character Volume
This is where you set the volume for CW reading.

CW Tone
This is where you set the frequency tone for CW reading.

Comments:

It is so easy to provide just frequency read out via CW. Blind fold
yourself and try to eat a meal, run a vacuum sweeper, wash walls, use
a microwave oven, cook on the stove, use a cell phone, use a computer,
use all abilities of the U-Bit-X,  Etc.

To make full use of the U-Bit-X for person who are blind, all display
abilities need to be outputted via some form of CW reading.
Abbreviated words might work in some situations. Examples, RX -
receiver, TX - transmitter, V A - vfo A, V B - VFO B, A VOX - anti
vox, G VOX - vox gaine, D VOX - vox delay, S VOX - vox sensativity,
ETC.

For those of you who are writing the CW reading code, make sure to
blindfold yourself when testing out this new feature. Then I look
forward to the results of your effort.

I can be reached at this <wd8ajq@...> email address.
Also, I am on Echo Link.
73 Dave WD8AJQ

Re: #ubitx-help #parts #ubitx-help #parts

Curt
 

A basic ubitx with one of those cases is a neat radio, that's what I have here. That case supplier also offers a matching set of wire bundles, very useful. Yes knobs are included, I don't remember needing anything else.

Enjoy shopping and your build.

Curt

Re: uBitx V3 low power continues

Curt
 

Ted

If this were my rig, I would suspect my own wiring before anything on the board. Yes been there sometimes. Lets check as much of the path from board to antenna connector as possible. Something might look soldered and may not be connected, yes I was there troubleshooting for weeks. Use your dvm to examine continuity,  both through and insuring no short. Next check the keying circuit. Power tends not to vanish like this on the board. Be patient,  the problem is there someplace. Limit your sessions to say 20 minutes max. Fresh eyes better at finding things, along with a dvm.

Curt wb8yyy

Re: NXP Homebrew RF Design Contest

ajparent1/KB1GMX
 

Currently building up an amp for 2M use using BLF184 a 600W device.
Since the basic amp is a mod to a dead TV transmitter amp the board
and many parts on it are free.

$137  For a BLF184  (no epay, fakes)
     0     Heatsink 7x10x2" from current supply 
            FYI the nearest part was 37$ and is smaller
            Has to remove in the range of 300-400W of heat
$ 34    Copper heat spreader 25x3x12inches 
$ 75    SWR and low pass filter for 2M W6PQL
$ 80    Amp control board
$ 10    bias control board, temp compensated.
$ 79    50V 20A [1000W] switch mode power supply
$150    box with metering to package it is an unknown budgeted $150.
$  25    used, TR relay, High isolation SMA for input side
$  20    board for Omron G2 series for output 
$  10    MPJA  two fans for cooling.

That list does not include misc SMA cables and other cables as needed (Fyi: all PTFE)
Or the 15A rated IEC input connector with filter (on hand) as well as my time to do the
mechanical and electrical work.  Likely a few $$ on screws, spacers, misc hardware.

Its about the price of the transistors.  It is nearly the cheap part even if free the rest
of the REQUIRED items to complete the amp are not cheap and those are low cost.

Another example on the bench:
$15  EBAY 70W HF amp... GIven to me, module kit
        The person that gave it to me wanted to know, is it real or junk?
$   5  two sets of IRF530 spares (suggested on many sites as must have)
$ 13  heatsink MPJA or Amazon
$ 70  Low pass filter  multiband 100W (w6pql board and 10 OmronG2 relays)
         I want this for a later much higher power project so, no junk.
         Closest epay is 47$, looks in adequate.
$   5  Input attenuator to keep the Ft817 (or other 5W radio) from over driving it
$   5  fan 
$  22  LMB box or similar box
It is assumed it runs on nominal 12V (at 15A peak a 12V 7ah gell cell is too small).
The board kit is cheap but far from a complete and well constructed AMP.

Things I actually do on my bench as a sample of real cost of building an amp.

Allison

Re: NXP Homebrew RF Design Contest

 

Very cool! Great work
--
David

 N8DAH
Kit-Projects.com

Shop is open!

Re: NXP Homebrew RF Design Contest

Vince Vielhaber
 

Nice write up. I'm looking forward to either boards or kits for this.

Vince - K8ZW.

On 10/31/2019 07:25 AM, Razvan (M0HZH) wrote:
Today is the last day of the challenge. I sent an entry as well, "A
600W broadband HF amplifier using two US$35 LDMOS devices"

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDm3PJY7yxk

Article with more details:
https://qrpblog.com/2019/10/a-600w-broadband-hf-amplifier-using-affordable-ldmos-devices/

Cheers,
Razvan (M0HZH)

Re: NXP Homebrew RF Design Contest

Tony W
 

I'd not seen this contest, which looks a great idea.  
Razan,  I'm looking for a med power HF amplifier to build, and have been thinking of MRF150 or similar (i have a couple of used ones).  However it is now quite an old design, and a  250W amp was published in several issues of the ARRL Handbook. I've seen more recent designs using quite costly devices - however good they are the cost puts me off.
If your design is repeatable I'm interested.  Good luck in the design contest. 

Best 73s
Tony, G4CIZ

Re: NXP Homebrew RF Design Contest

 

Looks good Razvan, all the best!

Raj, vu2zap


At 31-10-19, you wrote:
Today is the last day of the challenge. I sent an entry as well,  "A 600W broadband HF amplifier using two US$35 LDMOS devices"

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDm3PJY7yxk

Article with more details: https://qrpblog.com/2019/10/a-600w-broadband-hf-amplifier-using-affordable-ldmos-devices/

Cheers,
Razvan (M0HZH)

Re: NXP Homebrew RF Design Contest

Razvan (M0HZH)
 

Today is the last day of the challenge. I sent an entry as well,  "A 600W broadband HF amplifier using two US$35 LDMOS devices"

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDm3PJY7yxk

Article with more details: https://qrpblog.com/2019/10/a-600w-broadband-hf-amplifier-using-affordable-ldmos-devices/

Cheers,
Razvan (M0HZH)

Re: Multiple Project Files

Ashhar Farhan
 

Jack,
Thanks for the illuminating post. I always wondered about the difference between the two. Splitting an Arduino project into multiple files is quite painful. Unresolved externals, c++ vagueness and bad coding practices make life miserable for the refactoring zealots.
The other confusion is with the headers. What paths are searched? How are double quotes different from angle brackets?
Sorry analog folks, this question doesn't belong to a list dedicated to analog communications, but I assume that Jack Purdum must write the "Advanced Programming for thr Arduino" for the rest of us.

- f

On Thu 31 Oct, 2019, 8:25 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io, <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
All:

I just answered a question about Ver 5.1 of the µBITX source code. For those of you who think you might compile that code more than once, or anticipate projects with multiple files, consider doing what I discuss below.

Al and I recently worked on the JackAl code which is over 11,000 lines of code spread over 19 files. The first time in the morning when I compiled that project, it would take over a minute to compile, link, and upload the code. And that's on an 8-core processor scooting along a 3.8GHz. As some of you know, you tend to work fixing a bug on just one of those 19 files over and over. The interesting thing is, the second compile in the morning only takes about 15 seconds. The reason is because the GCC compiler, which is at the heart of the Arduino IDE, knows how to do "incremental compiles". That is, if you edit a file, the editor sets a "dirty flag" which tells the compiler this file has changed. All of the other "untouched" files have their dirty flag cleared. As a result, the compiler is smart enough to only compile those files with a set dirty flag, and tells the linker to use the cached version of the "clean" (previously-compiled) files. Now if you do 50 compiles a day (not unheard of around here), that saves you 37.5 minutes of thumb-twiddling each day. Over the 18 months it took to write JackAl, that's enough time for a long vacation.

Alas, the V5.1 code still has all of the files ending with INO, which prevents the compiler from doing incremental compiles. It appears that with all INO files, the compiler must gather all of the INO files into one huge file and then compile it. No incremental compiling takes place.

To take advantage of incremental compiles, there should only be 1 INO file, and that's the one that contains setup() and loop(). (This INO file name will also match the project directory name.) All of the other INO files should end in cpp (e.g., ubitx_cat.cpp) if it ended in INO. Although Farhan didn't use them, he could have put all the preprocessor directives (e.g., #include, #define, etc.) in a header file (e.g., ubitx_v5.1.h). Therefore, a valid project can have only 1 INO file, but all the cpp and H files you need.

Truth be told, the ubitx project is relatively small so you probably won't see much of a speed up, but if you take on a large project, the benefits are noticeable. Also, breaking a project into sensible task files like Farhan has done makes finding things a lot easier. Scrolling through 11,000 lines of code is almost no fun at all.

Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

Multiple Project Files

Jack, W8TEE
 

All:

I just answered a question about Ver 5.1 of the µBITX source code. For those of you who think you might compile that code more than once, or anticipate projects with multiple files, consider doing what I discuss below.

Al and I recently worked on the JackAl code which is over 11,000 lines of code spread over 19 files. The first time in the morning when I compiled that project, it would take over a minute to compile, link, and upload the code. And that's on an 8-core processor scooting along a 3.8GHz. As some of you know, you tend to work fixing a bug on just one of those 19 files over and over. The interesting thing is, the second compile in the morning only takes about 15 seconds. The reason is because the GCC compiler, which is at the heart of the Arduino IDE, knows how to do "incremental compiles". That is, if you edit a file, the editor sets a "dirty flag" which tells the compiler this file has changed. All of the other "untouched" files have their dirty flag cleared. As a result, the compiler is smart enough to only compile those files with a set dirty flag, and tells the linker to use the cached version of the "clean" (previously-compiled) files. Now if you do 50 compiles a day (not unheard of around here), that saves you 37.5 minutes of thumb-twiddling each day. Over the 18 months it took to write JackAl, that's enough time for a long vacation.

Alas, the V5.1 code still has all of the files ending with INO, which prevents the compiler from doing incremental compiles. It appears that with all INO files, the compiler must gather all of the INO files into one huge file and then compile it. No incremental compiling takes place.

To take advantage of incremental compiles, there should only be 1 INO file, and that's the one that contains setup() and loop(). (This INO file name will also match the project directory name.) All of the other INO files should end in cpp (e.g., ubitx_cat.cpp) if it ended in INO. Although Farhan didn't use them, he could have put all the preprocessor directives (e.g., #include, #define, etc.) in a header file (e.g., ubitx_v5.1.h). Therefore, a valid project can have only 1 INO file, but all the cpp and H files you need.

Truth be told, the ubitx project is relatively small so you probably won't see much of a speed up, but if you take on a large project, the benefits are noticeable. Also, breaking a project into sensible task files like Farhan has done makes finding things a lot easier. Scrolling through 11,000 lines of code is almost no fun at all.

Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

Re: uBitx CW transmit problem #ubitx-help #cw #ubitxcw

Lou KI5FTY
 

Found the problem with the transmit with trailing tone.  In memory manager you can set CW DELAY (TX-RX) and it was set to 0.  One would assume no delay.  Not true, it must use some system default. Changing it to 1 (10ms) shortened the relay hang time to an noticeable amount and the wave form looks ok.  2 Questions: 

1) is that a bug or undocumented feature ;-)
2) why would there be tone output while the relay is closed but no keyup?

Re: uBitx CW transmit problem #ubitx-help #cw #ubitxcw

Mike Kilpatrick
 

Very often apparent computer problems can be cured by a simple reboot of the pc.

 

Why not try re-loading the firmware? At best it could cure the problem. Worse case would be that it proves you have a hardware problem.

 

Mike  VK2DJP

 

 

From: Lou KI5FTY
Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2019 09:24
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] uBitx CW transmit problem #ubitx-help #cw #ubitxcw

 

Evan - for the cw keying issue, I have tried with a dummy load also and same result.  As for the TX off issue the CEC firmware has a setting to turn TX off but it does not seem to work for me

Thanks

 

Re: uBitx CW transmit problem #ubitx-help #cw #ubitxcw

Lou KI5FTY
 

Evan - for the cw keying issue, I have tried with a dummy load also and same result.  As for the TX off issue the CEC firmware has a setting to turn TX off but it does not seem to work for me

Thanks

Re: How to change uBitX startup display frequency

Guy WB7SZI
 

Yeah. Ashhar reminded me how to lock a different frequency into VFO A so on startup the display frequency is one I have selected. 
73,
Guy WB7SZI 

Re: uBitx CW transmit problem #ubitx-help #cw #ubitxcw

Evan Hand
 

Other than the straight vs Iambic key setting, I do not have any other suggestions.  It might be RF feedback as that as gotten me in the past.  I worked it out by using a dummy load vs an off center fed dipole.  The dummy load did not have the delay issue.

On the not activating the transmitter, the only way that I know of is to install a switch (or separate fuse as I have) on the PA power supply line. That would allow for using the side tone to practice sending.

73
Evan
AC9TU

uBitx V3 low power continues

Ted
 

This is a follow-up to another thread that is months old. I'm now recovering from cervical spine surgery & attendant complications of infection, so I've had time to repeat tests though not necessarily any clearer mind. Having only 15-20 degrees of rotation of my neck isn't helping, either, with bench work.

To review: a perfectly-functioning radio with typical RF out levels (12w out in 80, 10w in 40, 8w on 20, etc) has devolved to less than a watt on CW on all bands and even less on SSB. The exception is 20 meters, where a couple of watts in CW show up.

Let us assume the finals are fine and that all drivers and pre-drivers are OK. They all get warm, in fact. Suggestions were made to trace the RF thru the LPF array to ensure power wasn't being eaten by a stuck relay or bad filter. I think that this possibility has been eliminated, though I can't explain why the finals get warm and yet the output generally stinks AND worse on one mode than on another.

Again, the SSB signal is far below the CW/dead carrier level, perhaps it is 25-30% of carrier level (according to my oscillscope).  Output at the antenna connection shows approximately the same level as measured at the final transistors.

What dies, prior to Q90, that kills SSB and CW as described?   My sledge hammer works just fine and requires little skill to operate - and at this point makes a better communication tool than my uBitx. I'm not allowed to pick up 15 lbs, though, so that option is on standby. I just don't get it. 


Thanks,

Ted   K3RTA

Re: uBitx CW transmit problem #ubitx-help #cw #ubitxcw

Lou KI5FTY
 

if you are referring to the cw delay (TX->RX) - i have it set at 600 milliseconds.  I just switched it to 0 and verified the settings took by reloading them into memory manager.  Nothing has changed.