Date   
Re: Voltage at volume control of bitx40??

Don, ND6T
 

John,

In the vicinity of 10 millivolts for a readable signal at moderate volume. Consider it comparable to "line" levels for your stereo amplifier. 73, Don

Re: Easy desoldering of relays (& other multi-pin devices)

David Wilcox
 

Go to their site 


And watch their videos on all their products.  Miracle stuff.

David J. Wilcox K8WPE’s iPad

On Jul 19, 2019, at 4:05 PM, V Zecchinelli <n1vin@...> wrote:

I just tried this on removing a 64 pin SMD chip and it worked fantastic.  Have had Chipquik for a while but never used.  Worked GREAT!!!
THANKS!!!
73 Vince N1VIN


On 7/19/2019 7:59 AM, Michael Walker wrote:
This is why I recommend Chipquik.

It is a solder with a very high freezing temperature.  You mix it in with the current connection with  a soldering iron and then it stays soft for about 10 seconds giving you time to remove the part.

I had to remove a very large transformer from a HF amp that had 2 circuit boards joined together that was about 3cm long.  Without Chipquik, it would have been near impossible.  

I'm blown away how easy it is and how much safer it is to your board than the traditional methods of solder suckers, vacuum stations and even solder wick.  

You might want to watch their video.  This is new school and much newer technology.

Mike va3mw

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 2:09 AM David <dokrent@...> wrote:
The method fo removing solder through hole components; where you can access the component fully,
per my days in medical instrumentation, is to use fine wire cutters and cut the  leads as close to the body of
The component as possible. Then remove the component. Next take a small pair of needle nose pliers grab the lead and heat the pad using a tip with a drop of solder on it. When molten pull the lead out. Then reapply heat and use a solder sucker to clear the pad and through hole. This reduces the chances of damaging the feed through hole.

I am not a big fan of solder wick as it can often lead to overheating the pad and damaging it.

Also if you are having trouble getting a small piece of solder off a pad or feed through. Re-apply solder to the whole pad and feed through and then try the solder sucker again.




Re: RX BCI filters

 

On Sat, Jul 13, 2019 at 10:37 PM, David Posthuma wrote:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/KIT-Universal-Bandpass-Filters-for-HF-Transceivers-BPF-6-6-bands-12V/172672735615?hash=item283418d97f:g:VtYAAOSwXj5aon5k
Hi David,

Could be quite useful for BCI and other out of band receive interference, but I don't think it was made for transmiter harmonics/spur reduction.

73,


Mark.

Re: Voltage at volume control of bitx40??

 

Hi John,

The lm386 often states a common output power of 125mW.  This is actually a pretty strong volume level, but looking at it will give you an idea of what type of voltage you may see.  Po = V^2/R so 0.125W = V^2/8ohms so V^2 = 1 and V=1  This is an RMS value so peak would be 1.4V and peak to peak 2.8V.

Recall though that we need a doubling or halving of power to notice a  difference in volume, so you could actually be seeing voltages much less than this.

73,


Mark.

Re: Voltage at volume control of bitx40??

John Cardoso
 

Thanks Curt, I kinda left it undefined by asking for "voltage/s" but I should have added for an "average/comfortable listening volume". (May be? )
It's a toughie I know but I am still curious...
I'll take the sky height, tough. :)
Take care.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 9:27 PM Curt via Groups.Io <wb8yyy=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
John

I think you are asking how high is the sky. It depends how strong the signal received is as there is no agc. The rig is not known for robust audio. Start with headphones.  some folk use amplified external speakers or add an audio power amplifier.

Curt

Re: Voltage at volume control of bitx40??

Curt
 

John

I think you are asking how high is the sky. It depends how strong the signal received is as there is no agc. The rig is not known for robust audio. Start with headphones.  some folk use amplified external speakers or add an audio power amplifier.

Curt

Re: RX BCI filters

Christopher Miller
 

One of the maker spaces here in Tucson holds a low power fm radio license. They have all sorts of rf test equipment. I live in Tucson, so it’s probably worth while to just check and see if that is available near you.

KF4FTR

Re: Antuino 2.0

Karl Heinz Kremer, K5KHK
 

Jason, as you can see from Farhan’s comment a few replies back, he is still ironing out the last wrinkles in the design. You will have to wait a little longer. Just watch this group, I assume we will be the first ones to know ;)

--
Karl Heinz - K5KHK

Re: Antuino 2.0

jasonbrambach
 

Where does one buy the Antuino? I have looked at HFSignals sight for weeks and see only the description and a note saying, "It will be on sale from June 2019." Of course, there is no simple way to contact you through your website, F. Thank you for your help. Much obliged, Jay~ KY9I

Voltage at volume control of bitx40??

John Cardoso
 

Hi folks
Would a kind soul tell me, please, what is/are the peak-to-peak voltage/s I should expect at the high terminal of the bitx40's volume control.
Sorry, but I do not have a way to measure it. :(
Thanks
-John-

Re: Easy desoldering of relays (& other multi-pin devices)

V Zecchinelli
 

I just tried this on removing a 64 pin SMD chip and it worked fantastic.  Have had Chipquik for a while but never used.  Worked GREAT!!!
THANKS!!!
73 Vince N1VIN


On 7/19/2019 7:59 AM, Michael Walker wrote:
This is why I recommend Chipquik.

It is a solder with a very high freezing temperature.  You mix it in with the current connection with  a soldering iron and then it stays soft for about 10 seconds giving you time to remove the part.

I had to remove a very large transformer from a HF amp that had 2 circuit boards joined together that was about 3cm long.  Without Chipquik, it would have been near impossible.  

I'm blown away how easy it is and how much safer it is to your board than the traditional methods of solder suckers, vacuum stations and even solder wick.  

You might want to watch their video.  This is new school and much newer technology.

Mike va3mw

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 2:09 AM David <dokrent@...> wrote:
The method fo removing solder through hole components; where you can access the component fully,
per my days in medical instrumentation, is to use fine wire cutters and cut the  leads as close to the body of
The component as possible. Then remove the component. Next take a small pair of needle nose pliers grab the lead and heat the pad using a tip with a drop of solder on it. When molten pull the lead out. Then reapply heat and use a solder sucker to clear the pad and through hole. This reduces the chances of damaging the feed through hole.

I am not a big fan of solder wick as it can often lead to overheating the pad and damaging it.

Also if you are having trouble getting a small piece of solder off a pad or feed through. Re-apply solder to the whole pad and feed through and then try the solder sucker again.




Re: Easy desoldering of relays (& other multi-pin devices)

Julien NICOLAS
 

Hi,
My preferred way is to use an air compressor to blow molten solder.
Sometime I also use quick chip (bismuth).
Julien

Le 19/07/2019 8:09, David a écrit :
The method fo removing solder through hole components; where you can
access the component fully,
per my days in medical instrumentation, is to use fine wire cutters
and cut the leads as close to the body of
The component as possible. Then remove the component. Next take a
small pair of needle nose pliers grab the lead and heat the pad using
a tip with a drop of solder on it. When molten pull the lead out. Then
reapply heat and use a solder sucker to clear the pad and through
hole. This reduces the chances of damaging the feed through hole.
I am not a big fan of solder wick as it can often lead to overheating
the pad and damaging it.
Also if you are having trouble getting a small piece of solder off a
pad or feed through. Re-apply solder to the whole pad and feed through
and then try the solder sucker again.

Re: RX BCI filters

Mark Hatch
 

In regards to a spectrum analyzer....

The SDRPLAY has some add-on software that provides a basic spectrum analyzer. I used it to peak at my spurs/harmonics before and after. Could see the difference the changes made (relays and inductor). Again, wouldn't use this for absolute, but I could measure the db of spurs and harmonics and see that I was compliant except on the 10m band.  And with a noise source, you can look at the impact of filters too. Again, this will not replace a $2k+ spectrum analyzer, but I already had a SDRPLAY that I used with my IC-7300 as a spectrum display....

73
Mark

Re: Items For Sale uBITX V4 new -plus #filters #ubitx

Mark Hatch
 

I was offline yesterday. Did these items end up being sold?

73
Mark

Re: getting the uBitx on FT8

Mark Hatch
 

Don,

I did *not* use any isolation transformers. And as far as I can tell, there has been no ill effects. I also saw on other threads, where others did not include the transformers and seemed to be operational.

However, with that said, if you have everything together, why not keep them? I really don't know enough technically on this point to provide any guidance. I remember my 8th grade math teacher beating into my head that just because you found one example of where a proof was correct, that doesn't mean it is a proof. :-)

73
Mark
AJ6CU

Re: Easy desoldering of relays (& other multi-pin devices)

Don--AE4DW
 

Thanks for the recommendation, I had never heard of Chipquik until i read this thread, looks like a good tool for the tool box for those desoldering jobs involving multiple pins past 2 or 3.

I usually manage ok with solder wick and a Haako 808 desoldering gun, but will definitely pick some up.

Re: Expanding the Bitx Experience

Nigel
 

Greetings from sunny South Africa :-)

Tried accepting invitation, completed requested details, submitted confirmation code sent via SMS and nothing...

Will try again another day.

Good initiative but unless 'service' works then not going to get far!

73

Nigel ZS6RN ex G8DEV

Re: Easy desoldering of relays (& other multi-pin devices)

Michael Walker
 

This is why I recommend Chipquik.

It is a solder with a very high freezing temperature.  You mix it in with the current connection with  a soldering iron and then it stays soft for about 10 seconds giving you time to remove the part.

I had to remove a very large transformer from a HF amp that had 2 circuit boards joined together that was about 3cm long.  Without Chipquik, it would have been near impossible.  

I'm blown away how easy it is and how much safer it is to your board than the traditional methods of solder suckers, vacuum stations and even solder wick.  

You might want to watch their video.  This is new school and much newer technology.

Mike va3mw

On Fri, Jul 19, 2019 at 2:09 AM David <dokrent@...> wrote:
The method fo removing solder through hole components; where you can access the component fully,
per my days in medical instrumentation, is to use fine wire cutters and cut the  leads as close to the body of
The component as possible. Then remove the component. Next take a small pair of needle nose pliers grab the lead and heat the pad using a tip with a drop of solder on it. When molten pull the lead out. Then reapply heat and use a solder sucker to clear the pad and through hole. This reduces the chances of damaging the feed through hole.

I am not a big fan of solder wick as it can often lead to overheating the pad and damaging it.

Also if you are having trouble getting a small piece of solder off a pad or feed through. Re-apply solder to the whole pad and feed through and then try the solder sucker again.



Re: Easy desoldering of relays (& other multi-pin devices)

David
 

The method fo removing solder through hole components; where you can access the component fully,
per my days in medical instrumentation, is to use fine wire cutters and cut the leads as close to the body of
The component as possible. Then remove the component. Next take a small pair of needle nose pliers grab the lead and heat the pad using a tip with a drop of solder on it. When molten pull the lead out. Then reapply heat and use a solder sucker to clear the pad and through hole. This reduces the chances of damaging the feed through hole.

I am not a big fan of solder wick as it can often lead to overheating the pad and damaging it.

Also if you are having trouble getting a small piece of solder off a pad or feed through. Re-apply solder to the whole pad and feed through and then try the solder sucker again.

Re: RX BCI filters

Curt
 

David

Few of us can afford or choose to buy a spectrum analyzer. Some are having success with a SDR in measuring spurs, and I want to explore this route.

We can trust the results of the community. The circuit board designed by Gordon Gibby has been found to he highly effective in fixing harmonics, curing the major source of cw spurious. Kitting this could bring business to someone's store. Part 2 to cure mixing spurious has proven more difficult. A second xtal filter at 45 MHz was troublesome in my rig, but perhaps when I try shielded inductors might work better. 

Yes others having fun with putting on the blinders. My rig is dreadful on 12m, maybe not as bad on the other bands.

Curt