Date   
Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Thanks Raj, 
Yes, that makes sense. 
I'll have a crack at it this afternoon. 
Regards
H

Re: V4 TX selective failure #ubitx-help #cat

Evan Hand
 

First off, does it still receive as before?  That helps from the standpoint that the same clocks, mixers and filters are used for both receive and transmit.

The second question is how are the mic and audio from the digital interface connected?

Last question is what test equipment do you have?  For tests beyond static bias measurements, a scope or rf probe is required.   I have traced the signal through the TP's on the board using a 100 MHz scope and the power to the finals removed.  This would help in isolating the stage that is not amplifying, again IF the receiver still works as before.

Really need the answer to the first question before going forward with speculation.  

Take the above with a grain of salt and verify when possible.
73
Evan
AC9TU

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

 

Harry,

I think a pin is broken and still connected. If the ground pin momentarily disconnects then the IRF
will draw high current and blow the fuse. I've seen stranger things!

Raj

At 01-12-19, you wrote:
Hi Raj,
That's interesting and I've seen your post regarding this from a day or two ago.
I can see the logic to what you're saying and I'm definitely going to have a look at them this afternoon - I just think it's strange that this problem would 'suddenly' occur? Or am I being stupid and this is something that would randomly occur?
Thanks again.
Regards
H

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Hi Raj,
That's interesting and I've seen your post regarding this from a day or two ago.
I can see the logic to what you're saying and I'm definitely going to have a look at them this afternoon - I just think it's strange that this problem would 'suddenly' occur?  Or am I being stupid and this is something that would randomly occur?
Thanks again.
Regards
H

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Hi Evan and thank you,
I was using my 'droopy' dipole, but all testing has since been done into a dummy load - which I have also checked as I have two.
Regards
H

Re: Book TOC

Gordon Gibby
 

Thank you for your comments.

Gordon L Gibby MD MS(EE)
Assoc Prof Univ FL



On Nov 30, 2019, at 22:50, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Agree. Self-publishing would have done me little to no good in my university teaching as far as rank and tenure went. At the time, those were goals, mainly because I was raising a family. Also, once you have one book published, it gets easier to get the next one published...and so on down the road. I guess that's why I never investigated that route.

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:42:48 PM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


I could also give you a good reason why you should publish through the ARRL and avoid self-publication (as I've seen promoted).

Self-publication is now how some of the most stupid and ignorant nonsense is being peddled to the ignorant these days - leading them to believe and support things that they'd otherwise avoid.  With a reputable publishing agency (Publishing house, ARRL, and University Press varieties), there is at least some vetting and common sense barriers against nonsense.  If the publication is for academic use (and for many that aren't - like technical books) there is a peer review process which contrary to common thinking, isn't if the material is acceptable to the latest 'fad' thinking, but is based on if the science is sound, the logic applicable and accurately used, and the conclusions leading from the science (and also logically derived, based on clear thinking).  Then the peer reviewers have to defend their evaluations of the book - 'I didn't like it" isn't good enough! 

I rather think that the ARRL has something similar.

I've seen some of the craziest ideas get published through self-publishing.  I've helped teach a class focused on teaching students what science is and is not - through showing them pseudoscience and helping them to see the massive errors that usually fills those books and how they aren't what they claim to be.  It made some students (who'd bought into nonsense) very angry, but most of them left the class with a better understanding and appreciation of science.

In the long run, a book (or journal article) published through a reputable firm is worth more than one that is self-published, and is considered to be more valid.  IMO, it gives a good book a much longer 'life'.



On 11/30/19 10:33 AM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
When I got my first full-time teaching job, I bought a Life Membership to the ARRL. I paid $125 in 1970 for it. Probably one of the highest ROI I've ever had!

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:28:20 AM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


Absolutely right about e-books.  You can use them that way if you can do a word search (in doing, for instance, cultural research) and you can cut-and-paste from the text (for writing papers), but for anything more of a technical nature (with schematics, diagrams, and so on) - it's easier to print out the pages in question - defeating the purpose of the e-book.  (It might work if you have the space for a laptop or big tablet - but even then I'd rather have what I need on paper.)  If the e-book requires a specific reader, all the company has to do is change the reader and you're locked out of the very book you purchased.

I think I even still have an e-book purchased several years ago for reference, that the publisher put a 'disable date' in it - I could use it for a couple of years, but suddenly it wouldn't open any more with a message to re-purchase (a $50-$100 book at that).  No warning about time limits before purchase, I should add (from a big name book selling company, whose readers earned a lot of negative comments when their 'updates' disabled features that were regularly used by people).

I've got a couple of the ARRL books I purchased at a hamfest a few years ago - and would love to have yours - but at least for the next few months, wouldn't have the money (can't even afford ARRL dues for the last few years).  Maybe by the time it's in print we won't be quite so tight.

(Having the diagrams and so on available on CD can be a big help, btw.  VERY useful for searches - then go to the hardcopy for usage.  It's especially useful if you provide code or some sort of software!)

Bob

On 11/29/19 11:57 PM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
I've never self-published, mainly because of the difficulty in getting market presence. In this case, McGraw-Hill who published the original Projects book did absolutely nothing to promote the book, so there was no way that I was going to use them again. The ARRL does promote its books, so that was a major consideration. The other factor is that I want this to become a reference book...a springboard for others to enhance, and an ebook just doesn't seem to work in that arena...I wanted a book I could hold in my hand, and that's not cheap.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 7:25:11 PM EST, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Hey Jack, what were the most important factors that made you decide to go with ARRL instead of just publishing on Amazon yourself?


On Nov 29, 2019, at 14:30, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

The book you found is the one I wrote about 5 years ago. Note that it's title is Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio. Because that book did fairly well, and there has been a real advance in some of the microcontrollers, we are not limiting ourselves to the Arduino family of microcontrollers this time. Instead, we are limiting it to those that can be programmed within the Arduino (free) IDE. Therefore, the new book is titled Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. This time we have projects that use touch screen displays and the STM32F1, ESP32, and Teensy 4.0 microcontrollers. We do things in this book that simply were not possible in the first book simply because the resource depth and clock speed wasn't there.

Sorry for the confusion!

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 1:06:28 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

I am confused (my normal state!).  Your email says the book is not yet in publication but
It is already available in paperback and via Kindle.


Arv
_._


On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 10:38 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The book is not in print yet. In fact, it will be published by the ARRL and they say it won't be done until the second quarter of 2020. The title will be Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. Amazon will likely carry it, but we're encouraging people to support the ARRL directly if possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 12:24:15 PM EST, John Faivre <wa9sgd@...> wrote:


What is the title of the new book? I looked on amazon and didn’t see anything with those projects
--
thanks
John Faivre WA9SGD

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

V4 TX selective failure #ubitx-help #cat

Don - KM4UDX
 

Hello wise ones!
My V4 fails to push out RF when audio jack is driving -- voice or digital mode.
- Good news: when CW is key down: full power (yes!  So the back half of the TX chain works just fine.)
- When PPT on mic is pressed, rig goes into TX mode, but no RF output power regardless of mic drive level
- when pressing "tune" in WSJTX or Fldigi  the rig goes into TX mode, but no RF output juice regardless of audio (application) drive  level.  

So the problem seems to be early on in the audio chain?  The physical jack seems fine.

What/how do I do now to debug and fix?. 

Every day I'm off the air I lose WSPRnet ranking, and I feel so alone and isolated in the world. A quiet  uBITX is a sad uBITX...

Thank you thank you...

Re: 5/7" Nextion Firmware location

Justin Phillips K5AXL
 

Has anyone fixed the manual frequency screen 0 being labeled as 9 ? I tried to fix mine, but I haven't figured out much with Nextion Editor.

Re: Book TOC

Jack, W8TEE
 

Agree. Self-publishing would have done me little to no good in my university teaching as far as rank and tenure went. At the time, those were goals, mainly because I was raising a family. Also, once you have one book published, it gets easier to get the next one published...and so on down the road. I guess that's why I never investigated that route.

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:42:48 PM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


I could also give you a good reason why you should publish through the ARRL and avoid self-publication (as I've seen promoted).

Self-publication is now how some of the most stupid and ignorant nonsense is being peddled to the ignorant these days - leading them to believe and support things that they'd otherwise avoid.  With a reputable publishing agency (Publishing house, ARRL, and University Press varieties), there is at least some vetting and common sense barriers against nonsense.  If the publication is for academic use (and for many that aren't - like technical books) there is a peer review process which contrary to common thinking, isn't if the material is acceptable to the latest 'fad' thinking, but is based on if the science is sound, the logic applicable and accurately used, and the conclusions leading from the science (and also logically derived, based on clear thinking).  Then the peer reviewers have to defend their evaluations of the book - 'I didn't like it" isn't good enough! 

I rather think that the ARRL has something similar.

I've seen some of the craziest ideas get published through self-publishing.  I've helped teach a class focused on teaching students what science is and is not - through showing them pseudoscience and helping them to see the massive errors that usually fills those books and how they aren't what they claim to be.  It made some students (who'd bought into nonsense) very angry, but most of them left the class with a better understanding and appreciation of science.

In the long run, a book (or journal article) published through a reputable firm is worth more than one that is self-published, and is considered to be more valid.  IMO, it gives a good book a much longer 'life'.



On 11/30/19 10:33 AM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
When I got my first full-time teaching job, I bought a Life Membership to the ARRL. I paid $125 in 1970 for it. Probably one of the highest ROI I've ever had!

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:28:20 AM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


Absolutely right about e-books.  You can use them that way if you can do a word search (in doing, for instance, cultural research) and you can cut-and-paste from the text (for writing papers), but for anything more of a technical nature (with schematics, diagrams, and so on) - it's easier to print out the pages in question - defeating the purpose of the e-book.  (It might work if you have the space for a laptop or big tablet - but even then I'd rather have what I need on paper.)  If the e-book requires a specific reader, all the company has to do is change the reader and you're locked out of the very book you purchased.

I think I even still have an e-book purchased several years ago for reference, that the publisher put a 'disable date' in it - I could use it for a couple of years, but suddenly it wouldn't open any more with a message to re-purchase (a $50-$100 book at that).  No warning about time limits before purchase, I should add (from a big name book selling company, whose readers earned a lot of negative comments when their 'updates' disabled features that were regularly used by people).

I've got a couple of the ARRL books I purchased at a hamfest a few years ago - and would love to have yours - but at least for the next few months, wouldn't have the money (can't even afford ARRL dues for the last few years).  Maybe by the time it's in print we won't be quite so tight.

(Having the diagrams and so on available on CD can be a big help, btw.  VERY useful for searches - then go to the hardcopy for usage.  It's especially useful if you provide code or some sort of software!)

Bob

On 11/29/19 11:57 PM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
I've never self-published, mainly because of the difficulty in getting market presence. In this case, McGraw-Hill who published the original Projects book did absolutely nothing to promote the book, so there was no way that I was going to use them again. The ARRL does promote its books, so that was a major consideration. The other factor is that I want this to become a reference book...a springboard for others to enhance, and an ebook just doesn't seem to work in that arena...I wanted a book I could hold in my hand, and that's not cheap.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 7:25:11 PM EST, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Hey Jack, what were the most important factors that made you decide to go with ARRL instead of just publishing on Amazon yourself?


On Nov 29, 2019, at 14:30, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

The book you found is the one I wrote about 5 years ago. Note that it's title is Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio. Because that book did fairly well, and there has been a real advance in some of the microcontrollers, we are not limiting ourselves to the Arduino family of microcontrollers this time. Instead, we are limiting it to those that can be programmed within the Arduino (free) IDE. Therefore, the new book is titled Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. This time we have projects that use touch screen displays and the STM32F1, ESP32, and Teensy 4.0 microcontrollers. We do things in this book that simply were not possible in the first book simply because the resource depth and clock speed wasn't there.

Sorry for the confusion!

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 1:06:28 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

I am confused (my normal state!).  Your email says the book is not yet in publication but
It is already available in paperback and via Kindle.


Arv
_._


On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 10:38 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The book is not in print yet. In fact, it will be published by the ARRL and they say it won't be done until the second quarter of 2020. The title will be Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. Amazon will likely carry it, but we're encouraging people to support the ARRL directly if possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 12:24:15 PM EST, John Faivre <wa9sgd@...> wrote:


What is the title of the new book? I looked on amazon and didn’t see anything with those projects
--
thanks
John Faivre WA9SGD

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

Re: Book TOC

Robert D. Bowers
 

I could also give you a good reason why you should publish through the ARRL and avoid self-publication (as I've seen promoted).

Self-publication is now how some of the most stupid and ignorant nonsense is being peddled to the ignorant these days - leading them to believe and support things that they'd otherwise avoid.  With a reputable publishing agency (Publishing house, ARRL, and University Press varieties), there is at least some vetting and common sense barriers against nonsense.  If the publication is for academic use (and for many that aren't - like technical books) there is a peer review process which contrary to common thinking, isn't if the material is acceptable to the latest 'fad' thinking, but is based on if the science is sound, the logic applicable and accurately used, and the conclusions leading from the science (and also logically derived, based on clear thinking).  Then the peer reviewers have to defend their evaluations of the book - 'I didn't like it" isn't good enough! 

I rather think that the ARRL has something similar.

I've seen some of the craziest ideas get published through self-publishing.  I've helped teach a class focused on teaching students what science is and is not - through showing them pseudoscience and helping them to see the massive errors that usually fills those books and how they aren't what they claim to be.  It made some students (who'd bought into nonsense) very angry, but most of them left the class with a better understanding and appreciation of science.

In the long run, a book (or journal article) published through a reputable firm is worth more than one that is self-published, and is considered to be more valid.  IMO, it gives a good book a much longer 'life'.



On 11/30/19 10:33 AM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
When I got my first full-time teaching job, I bought a Life Membership to the ARRL. I paid $125 in 1970 for it. Probably one of the highest ROI I've ever had!

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:28:20 AM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


Absolutely right about e-books.  You can use them that way if you can do a word search (in doing, for instance, cultural research) and you can cut-and-paste from the text (for writing papers), but for anything more of a technical nature (with schematics, diagrams, and so on) - it's easier to print out the pages in question - defeating the purpose of the e-book.  (It might work if you have the space for a laptop or big tablet - but even then I'd rather have what I need on paper.)  If the e-book requires a specific reader, all the company has to do is change the reader and you're locked out of the very book you purchased.

I think I even still have an e-book purchased several years ago for reference, that the publisher put a 'disable date' in it - I could use it for a couple of years, but suddenly it wouldn't open any more with a message to re-purchase (a $50-$100 book at that).  No warning about time limits before purchase, I should add (from a big name book selling company, whose readers earned a lot of negative comments when their 'updates' disabled features that were regularly used by people).

I've got a couple of the ARRL books I purchased at a hamfest a few years ago - and would love to have yours - but at least for the next few months, wouldn't have the money (can't even afford ARRL dues for the last few years).  Maybe by the time it's in print we won't be quite so tight.

(Having the diagrams and so on available on CD can be a big help, btw.  VERY useful for searches - then go to the hardcopy for usage.  It's especially useful if you provide code or some sort of software!)

Bob

On 11/29/19 11:57 PM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
I've never self-published, mainly because of the difficulty in getting market presence. In this case, McGraw-Hill who published the original Projects book did absolutely nothing to promote the book, so there was no way that I was going to use them again. The ARRL does promote its books, so that was a major consideration. The other factor is that I want this to become a reference book...a springboard for others to enhance, and an ebook just doesn't seem to work in that arena...I wanted a book I could hold in my hand, and that's not cheap.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 7:25:11 PM EST, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Hey Jack, what were the most important factors that made you decide to go with ARRL instead of just publishing on Amazon yourself?


On Nov 29, 2019, at 14:30, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

The book you found is the one I wrote about 5 years ago. Note that it's title is Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio. Because that book did fairly well, and there has been a real advance in some of the microcontrollers, we are not limiting ourselves to the Arduino family of microcontrollers this time. Instead, we are limiting it to those that can be programmed within the Arduino (free) IDE. Therefore, the new book is titled Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. This time we have projects that use touch screen displays and the STM32F1, ESP32, and Teensy 4.0 microcontrollers. We do things in this book that simply were not possible in the first book simply because the resource depth and clock speed wasn't there.

Sorry for the confusion!

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 1:06:28 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

I am confused (my normal state!).  Your email says the book is not yet in publication but
It is already available in paperback and via Kindle.


Arv
_._


On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 10:38 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The book is not in print yet. In fact, it will be published by the ARRL and they say it won't be done until the second quarter of 2020. The title will be Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. Amazon will likely carry it, but we're encouraging people to support the ARRL directly if possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 12:24:15 PM EST, John Faivre <wa9sgd@...> wrote:


What is the title of the new book? I looked on amazon and didn’t see anything with those projects
--
thanks
John Faivre WA9SGD

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

KD8CEC ‘s SWR senser

Joel Trenalone
 

Greetings All,
I have been working on my UBiTx V5 for a few months now and have added KD8CEC update with nextion screen and the I2C update. I had all the features working (CW decode etc) except the SWR meter. 


I built a kitsandparts SWR bridge and hooked it up to the second Arduino, but the meter never operated correctly. I traced the problem to the bridge after hooking an oscilloscope up to the forward and reverse outputs and noticed that the reverse voltage would bounce up to 4 volts or so before settling down in a few seconds (this was while hooked to a 50 ohm dummy load. While the probe was hooked up, the meter on the Nextion display would go high and then settle down to a good swr reading. But when I removed the oscope probe, the meter would just stay pegged at very high SWR. 


I ran across a blog here (http://www.kk5jy.net/swr-meter-v1/)     about building a digital SWR meter and noted that he stated  that “In order to prevent stray RF from getting into the A/D circuits, I placed a 0.05uF ceramic disc capacitor between each line and the GND pin.  Since the A/D inputs are very high-impedance, and the SWR sensor outputs were meant to drive current devices (e.g., analog meters), I also placed a 75k resistor across each of the 0.05uF caps, to drain the accumulated charge when no RF was applied”. 


After I did this it the SWR meter works great. I was just wondering if anyone has hooked up KD8CEC’s meter and had similar issues. In an effort to learn more, I  also wondered if anyone can better explain why the resistor and capacitor fixed the situation. 

thanks,
Joel
KD6AGW

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

 

I think same problem with RV3 if skewed then lead is cut and connection intermittent.
This would lead to sudden jump in current thus fuse blowing.

The ladies at HFSignals are twisting the RV3 to accommodate the heatsink and causing
failure.

Raj


At 01/12/2019, you wrote:

Hi and regards from the UK.

 

I have a uBitx V5 which has been working great for the last few months and I have been loving it. I have incorporated a few mods – Allison’s power mods, AGC & Dr Ian Lee’s firmware – latest mod was about a month ago.

 

Yesterday it blew the 2A fuse on transmit. I have checked everything I can think of from the mic to the cables to the power supply, checked earths, checked for shorts all to no avail. In the meantime, whilst continuously testing it, I have blown a further 6 fuses. I even turned RV1 down to practically nothing and still the problem continued. I also replaced the FET’s just in case, but unsurprisingly, that made no difference. It receives perfectly, but as soon as I transmit, bang goes a fuse.

 

I am a relative newbie – currently studying for my Full license, so, far from experienced. My test equipment consists of a DMM.

 

Any help to point me in the right direction would be enormously appreciated as frankly, I am at my wits end.

 

Regards

Harry

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

Evan Hand
 

Are you using a dummy load or antenna?

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Just tried it Paul - Same result ...

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

wnpauls
 

I think it would be safe to try a 3 amp fuse.

Paul K0ZYV

Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Hi and regards from the UK.

 

I have a uBitx V5 which has been working great for the last few months and I have been loving it. I have incorporated a few mods – Allison’s power mods, AGC & Dr Ian Lee’s firmware – latest mod was about a month ago.

 

Yesterday it blew the 2A fuse on transmit. I have checked everything I can think of from the mic to the cables to the power supply, checked earths, checked for shorts all to no avail. In the meantime, whilst continuously testing it, I have blown a further 6 fuses. I even turned RV1 down to practically nothing and still the problem continued. I also replaced the FET’s just in case, but unsurprisingly, that made no difference. It receives perfectly, but as soon as I transmit, bang goes a fuse.

 

I am a relative newbie – currently studying for my Full license, so, far from experienced. My test equipment consists of a DMM.

 

Any help to point me in the right direction would be enormously appreciated as frankly, I am at my wits end.

 

Regards

Harry

Re: Adjusting pa bias (RV3) blows one of the final #ubitx

Michael Bauer
 

I found on my ver 5 ubitx build that mic audio level greatly affects RF output power for voice mode.  I added a standalone mic preamp with a level pot to adjust my RF output for voice modes.  In parallel to the mic input to the ubitx board I added a level pot for digital mode audio power.  I adjust the level to a bit shy of max SSB RF output.  Too much level on either will give more energy into the harmonics.  I verified the operation of my build with a spectrum analyzer with an attenuated dummy load.  My takeaway, different mic audio levels, or even different mics will affect RF SSB output.

If you add a key, then the raduino will inject it's own audio freq  into the TX chain, and you can compare voice SSB RF output levels to the key RF output levels. The PA design is not flat power across all bands, but you should be able to get comparable key and SSB power levels within each band.

5/7" Nextion Firmware location

Mark Hatch
 

If you have a 5" or 7" Nextion screen, the location to download the "current" screens is:

https://groups.io/g/BITX20/files/AJ6CU%20Nextion%205-inch%20files/Nextion%205inch%20June%2023,%202019-Released

This location has prebuilt ".tft" files for both the basic and enhanced versions of the 5". And it also has the ".hmi" file that can be read into the Nextion editor and re-compiled for the 7" (screen resolution are the same, so just get a bigger interface).  As far as I know, the usual suspect for the 5" Nextion screens (ubitx.net and KD8CEC) are only offering 2.8/3.2 inch screens that have been recompiled for the 5". They look terrible only occupying a small portion of the screen real estate.

I know there are several people working on enhancing them. So stay tuned for additional updates that obsoletes this announcement.

73
Mark
AJ6CU

Re: SD card question

wnpauls
 

thanks

Paul

Re: 5 inch Bezel for Nextion display.

Mark Hatch
 

A full set of 5” screen firmware that are the right size are in the file section under “AJ6CU”.


73
Mark
AJ6CU