Date   
Re: SI5351 simultaneous clock changes #ubitx-help

John <passionfruit88@...>
 

Hello Jerry,

Yes that is a simpler solution. Thanks.

73, John (VK2ETA)

Re: #ubitx Progressive 50dB+ Software based RX (and TX) IF attenuation. #ubitx

John <passionfruit88@...>
 

Hello Jerry,

Interesting point. How would you generate the Tx frequency?

Clock 1 would need to be in the vicinity of 45Mhz +/- for the attenuation. The image generated in the clock 2 mixer would be again well over the LPF, so no issue there.

Then I am not sure what the gain of Q20-22 stage would do to the driving signal level. Maybe with sufficient shift in clock 1 to attenuate the signal, re-amplify in that Q20-22 stage and it could be of the right level?

73, John

Re: #ubitx Progressive 50dB+ Software based RX (and TX) IF attenuation. #ubitx

John <passionfruit88@...>
 

Thank you Rob, but luck sometimes has it's place too.

It happened that I noticed that effect when chasing my multiple birdies before replacing the Arduino Nano, and I mentioned a mis-alignment then and its effect on gain, thought about it, then left that idea aside until recently...hihi

73, John 

Re: Open letter to the uBITX community from Jim Sheldon, W0EB. #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

Though skunk oil is still used on trains operating in some remote areas:
    https://www.skunktrain.com/


On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 02:38 pm, Richard Spohn wrote:
Yes, skunks were the original power for his cars. Smelled bad, so he
switched to petroleum. Still smells bad. - Rich

Re: Open letter to the uBITX community from Jim Sheldon, W0EB. #ubitx

Richard Spohn
 

Yes, skunks were the original power for his cars. Smelled bad, so he
switched to petroleum. Still smells bad. - Rich

On 4/1/18, Dexter N Muir <dexy@...> wrote:
... similarly uneddicatified... Didn't Henry Ford have a 'skunk works'?

Re: Open letter to the uBITX community from Jim Sheldon, W0EB. #ubitx

Richard Spohn
 

On 4/1/18, Dexter N Muir <dexy@...> wrote:
... similarly uneddicatified... Didn't Henry Ford have a 'skunk works'?

Re: Wanted uBitx updated Radrunio - #ubitx-help

Jim Sheldon
 

Jeff,
sent you a couple of emails.  Apparently gmail is blocking all correspondence from my ISP at the moment. I receive yours though.    If you got  mine, I sent you my phone#.  If you didn't get them, email me your # and I'll call you.

Jim, W0EB

Re: #ubitx Progressive 50dB+ Software based RX (and TX) IF attenuation. #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

Might be possible to use John's 45mhz IF filter trick to attenuate CW also.

Currently, CW-KEY unbalances the first mixer at T2 pins 3,5 when sending CW.
We could have CW-KEY instead unbalance the second mixer, at T4 pins 3,5.

Re: A story of discovery...and uBITX #ubitx

Rob Snow
 

The flatness is appealing to me as well.  If I can get it flat, via drive circuitry, finals, or some combination then I can build myself an amplifier as its own project to see if I can create a local aurora centered above my house...the boys will love that and the wife and daughter will continue to roll their eyes.

73 Rob AG5OV

Re: A story of discovery...and uBITX #ubitx

Tim Gorman
 

Rob,

It's why I have a 2nd one on order. I've modified this one about all
I'm going to. My first one is my power outage rig and it works fine.
Going to leave it alone. When the new comes in I'll leave it on a
breadboard to play with and worry about a case later.

I'm not concerned about more power but would like to have more
equalized power across the bands. I'll probably only play with the
driving circuitry.

I also want to see if I can get the carrier suppression to a good level
instead of marginal and the same for the 3rd order IMD.

tim ab0wr

On Mon, 02 Apr 2018 12:05:49 -0700
"Rob Snow" <rsnow@...> wrote:

Thank you for all the stories, I love hearing them and I'll bet
others do too.

I'm certain, now, that jumping into an IC-7300 wouldn't have supplied
the same experience...not that I won't end up with one (or a FT-450D,
as funds allow).

The joys and countless hours of fretting over coax (ended up using
400MAX), discovering and solving broadcast interference, driving
ground rods and tying them, lightning arrestor, even something as
simple as picking a 2 way antenna switch has led to much education
and knowledge.

Now to ponder this 2nd uBITX and these RD16's sitting on the shelf...

73 Rob AG5OV

Re: RD16HHF1 power curve flattening...some

chris gress <Chrisg0wfh@...>
 

Would bn73-202 work with rd16hhf1 I got bn43-202 just getting the bits for the mod chris


On Mon, 2 Apr 2018, 16:58 Jose Amador, <jose.co2ja@...> wrote:
I agree 10 watts is good enough. It does not make sense from the
linearity, thermal and energy management to just gain half a true S
unit. Also, to "nail" the output to what you can get on 10 m, and
attenuate the drive on the lower bands, a piece of cake. To me, the
next logical step is at least 6 to 10 dB (40 100 watts). That is a job
for an external amplifier. 30 years ago 10 watts was good enough.
Nowadays cheap SWPSU have increased the noise floor 30 dB. The goal
should be to strive to lower that level of EMI pollution. You can't
work'em if you can't hear'em!

On 4/1/18, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:
> How much power should we put out? It is really your call. I personally
> prefer 10 watts. There are multiple reasons. First, between 10 watts and
> 20 watts, the other side will feel almost no difference. Second, at 10
> watts, I can still you batteries. Third, the heatsink is managable.
> Fourth, I am technically in QRP land.
>
> - f
>
>
> On Sunday 01 April 2018 09:03 AM, Nik VK4PLN wrote:
>> Hi John,
>> BN42-202, but a 2:4 ratio winding giving 1:4 transformation. Runs cool
>> at 20+w with 330pf Mica cap. 220ohm feedback resistor.
>> Listening on 14.277 ?
>> 73 Nick
>>
>
>



Re: Wanted uBitx updated Radrunio - #ubitx-help

Jerry Gaffke
 

Check that your key contacts are clean, maybe pull a sheet of clean paper through them.
Then check the voltage across the key with a DVM, should be 5v with the key up, 0v when the key is down.
If it's somewhere in-between, it will think you have an iambic paddle hooked up.

The ideal solution for those wishing to use the uBItx with a straight key is outlined in this thread:
   https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/44395
Adds a menu entry to select "CW Mode" vs "SSB Mode", then uses the PTT line for a straight key.
Could key the transmitter using a the PTT button on the mike when in CW mode.
Should work much cleaner to have a digital read of the keying line instead of interpreting 
one of four voltage levels as is currently done to support the iambic keyer.

Jerry


On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 01:00 pm, Jeffrey Peters wrote:
I just finished wiring up an original first run uBitx that I received late Dec. 2017.  I am mainly a CW operator and use a straight key 100 percent of the time.
The original firmware I think does not allow for straight key use.  All I get is the letter "A" when I try to transmit. 

I would like to purchase a programmed Raduino with the updated firmware loaded so I can operate CW with a straight key.  If there is anyone willing to help
me with this request I would much appreciate your help and kindness.  Please contact me with my posted email address on QRZ.com to lessen the daily emails posted here on the groups.io .I have ordered a NANO to try and do this myself. 

I know, I do not understand PC's and their file systems or what the file system levels are called to reach my goal.

Re: Arduino For Idiots?

Fred Buecker
 

Funny story, I actually ordered two copies on Jack's book. When they arrived, my 10yo daughter said "Yay! You got one for me too!"

So much for selling that extra copy! LOL!

-Fred 
KC3HMS

On Mon, Apr 2, 2018, 12:42 PM Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My point is, for some young person thinking about a career in electronics,
the Arduino environment is not a bad place to start.
It encourages exploring the interface between a computer and external hardware.
It's possible for the inquisitive to completely figure out what's going on down to nand gates.
And learning C is not time wasted.

That said, at some point they should move on to a more professional programming environment, as you suggest.
I'd recommend installing some flavor of Ubuntu on an old machine, and explore the many different
programming languages available for free.  Me, I'm happiest with vanilla C and/or Python.

Start a new programmer out in the typical Java programming environment
and they may just give up, figuring it's turtles all the way down.
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtles_all_the_way_down

For me, it was when I moved from submitting Fortran card decks to the computing center
and started writing assembly code for a little PDP8 that I really got excited about
programming and computer architecture.  I could finally understand what a computer *is*.

Jerry

On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 09:10 am, James Lynes wrote:
Jerry:

"The Arduino environment is not a bad choice if wishing to start on the path
toward becoming a hardware or software engineer."

I'm torn on this....necessary but not sufficient....

Wanted uBitx updated Radrunio - #ubitx-help

Jeffrey Peters <dek9jp@...>
 

Greetings, 

I just finished wiring up an original first run uBitx that I received late Dec. 2017.  I am mainly a CW operator and use a straight key 100 percent of the time.
The original firmware I think does not allow for straight key use.  All I get is the letter "A" when I try to transmit. 

I would like to purchase a programmed Raduino with the updated firmware loaded so I can operate CW with a straight key.  If there is anyone willing to help
me with this request I would much appreciate your help and kindness.  Please contact me with my posted email address on QRZ.com to lessen the daily emails posted here on the groups.io .I have ordered a NANO to try and do this myself. 

I know, I do not understand PC's and their file systems or what the file system levels are called to reach my goal.

73 and TU, de Jeff K9JP

Re: A story of discovery...and uBITX #ubitx

Rob Snow
 

Thank you for all the stories, I love hearing them and I'll bet others do too.

I'm certain, now, that jumping into an IC-7300 wouldn't have supplied the same experience...not that I won't end up with one (or a FT-450D, as funds allow).

The joys and countless hours of fretting over coax (ended up using 400MAX), discovering and solving broadcast interference, driving ground rods and tying them, lightning arrestor, even something as simple as picking a 2 way antenna switch has led to much education and knowledge.

Now to ponder this 2nd uBITX and these RD16's sitting on the shelf...

73 Rob AG5OV

Re: uBITX BAT54SL: diode ring mixer direction question

Michael Hagen
 

I made some Mixer PCBs to play with.

I used an little more expensive match diode ring.

The is a spot for matching transformers and a Pad Attenuator.

I did use one and I heard signals, but did no testing.


Here is the data.

I have extra PCBs, email me for info?


Mike, WA6ISP

motdog at Verizon dot net





On 4/2/2018 9:38 AM, Tim Gorman wrote:
Michael,

I got used to using a prototype board called a Surfboard. There are
many different arrangements of pads. While expensive on a per-unit
basis it works for me. You still have to cut traces to make pads for
things like smd transistors and jfets and to provide isolated pads for
components but you don't have to do it for the whole circuit board. I
just layout how I'm going to do it on a piece of paper and then work on
the board. 

I have never heard of a burin. I've always just used a hobby knife and
while it works its hard to get straight cuts and to then clean out
between the cuts. 

What brand of burin do you use? Do they make one that would useful to
remove the trace between cuts?

I see this set on ebay, would they work?
www.ebay.com/itm/6pcs-2-35mm-Engraving-Bit-Burin-Graver-Pit-Olive-Ivory-Carving-Tool/173093922415?epid=8015978400&hash=item284d33a66f:g:IRcAAOSw-JJaWOOx

We are probably a little different in age. I keep my notes in engineers
notebooks, the kind that have graph paper on every page. A carryover
from my Chemistry/Physics/EE training in the late 60's and early 70's.
I like flipping through the pages. 

Good luck in whatever you create!

tim ab0wr



On Mon, 02 Apr 2018 08:08:07 -0700
"Michael LeBlanc" <michaelleblanc1@...> wrote:

Thanks Tim and Raj. I'll go ahead and wire things up now that I know.
Once I get the mixer soldered-up, I'll check it with my signal
generator and scope.

By the way, I do keep a journal: I scan most of my pencil sketches
and drawings and save them in Evernote ( https://evernote.com/ ). I'm
using SMD components; my layout drawings are made with Adobe
Illustrator and hand-cutting pads and traces on a PCB using an
engraver's burin ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burin_(engraving)
) acquired many years ago through my fine art degree. "Come up and
see my etchings!" ;-) I hope to document this process once I get a
little further along.

At any rate, this technique is very time-consuming at the front-end
of the development cycle. It requires several layers of
error-checking, and if I do it properly, it results in a
perfectly-working circuit at initial power-up. 

-Michael VE1LEB





-- 
Mike Hagen, WA6ISP
10917 Bryant Street
Yucaipa, Ca. 92399
(909) 918-0058
PayPal ID  "MotDog@..."
Mike@...

Re: No More Smoke -- Changes to our podcast

Paul Mooney <pmooney22@...>
 

And the date yesterday was?

Paul 5B8BA

Re: Arduino For Idiots?

Jerry Gaffke
 

My point is, for some young person thinking about a career in electronics,
the Arduino environment is not a bad place to start.
It encourages exploring the interface between a computer and external hardware.
It's possible for the inquisitive to completely figure out what's going on down to nand gates.
And learning C is not time wasted.

That said, at some point they should move on to a more professional programming environment, as you suggest.
I'd recommend installing some flavor of Ubuntu on an old machine, and explore the many different
programming languages available for free.  Me, I'm happiest with vanilla C and/or Python.

Start a new programmer out in the typical Java programming environment
and they may just give up, figuring it's turtles all the way down.
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turtles_all_the_way_down

For me, it was when I moved from submitting Fortran card decks to the computing center
and started writing assembly code for a little PDP8 that I really got excited about
programming and computer architecture.  I could finally understand what a computer *is*.

Jerry


On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 09:10 am, James Lynes wrote:
Jerry:

"The Arduino environment is not a bad choice if wishing to start on the path
toward becoming a hardware or software engineer."

I'm torn on this....necessary but not sufficient....

Re: uBITX BAT54SL: diode ring mixer direction question

Tim Gorman
 

Michael,

I got used to using a prototype board called a Surfboard. There are
many different arrangements of pads. While expensive on a per-unit
basis it works for me. You still have to cut traces to make pads for
things like smd transistors and jfets and to provide isolated pads for
components but you don't have to do it for the whole circuit board. I
just layout how I'm going to do it on a piece of paper and then work on
the board.

I have never heard of a burin. I've always just used a hobby knife and
while it works its hard to get straight cuts and to then clean out
between the cuts.

What brand of burin do you use? Do they make one that would useful to
remove the trace between cuts?

I see this set on ebay, would they work?
www.ebay.com/itm/6pcs-2-35mm-Engraving-Bit-Burin-Graver-Pit-Olive-Ivory-Carving-Tool/173093922415?epid=8015978400&hash=item284d33a66f:g:IRcAAOSw-JJaWOOx

We are probably a little different in age. I keep my notes in engineers
notebooks, the kind that have graph paper on every page. A carryover
from my Chemistry/Physics/EE training in the late 60's and early 70's.
I like flipping through the pages.

Good luck in whatever you create!

tim ab0wr



On Mon, 02 Apr 2018 08:08:07 -0700
"Michael LeBlanc" <@VE1LEB> wrote:

Thanks Tim and Raj. I'll go ahead and wire things up now that I know.
Once I get the mixer soldered-up, I'll check it with my signal
generator and scope.

By the way, I do keep a journal: I scan most of my pencil sketches
and drawings and save them in Evernote ( https://evernote.com/ ). I'm
using SMD components; my layout drawings are made with Adobe
Illustrator and hand-cutting pads and traces on a PCB using an
engraver's burin ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burin_(engraving)
) acquired many years ago through my fine art degree. "Come up and
see my etchings!" ;-) I hope to document this process once I get a
little further along.

At any rate, this technique is very time-consuming at the front-end
of the development cycle. It requires several layers of
error-checking, and if I do it properly, it results in a
perfectly-working circuit at initial power-up. 

-Michael VE1LEB

Re: Arduino For Idiots?

Jack, W8TEE
 

James:

I don't know. A lot depends upon your goals. I remember going to Cleveland for my draft physical (1960's) and hearing guys say they were going to intentionally fail the "intelligence" test. Really? If you could fog a mirror you were eligible for the draft. My thought was make myself so valuable they wouldn't want to use me as cannon fodder. If I were a high school student with no prospect of going to college or trade school because of finances, I'd learn all I could about the Arduino. The platform is cheap and the basics of programming and electronics is always valuable...then I'd join the military. There are worse options for a career path. If I'm a retired ham, I'd want to learn for different reasons, mostly just out of curiosity. There are a bazillion free programming tutorials online and I know of some good intro programming books for someone who has never programmed before.

The Arduino family is up to most tasks, but not all. I've done numerous projects using external and internal interrupt routines and also software timing schedulers. Adding an RTC to an Arduino is easy and cheap. That said, my current project uses some FFT routines and even the Due and Zero aren't fast enough. However, the Teensy 3.6 is and I can still use the same Arduino IDE which lessens the learning curve for the move to a new processor.

Sure, it's nice to know assembler and have a "real" OS to talk to, but for hams, that might not be an issue. For someone who is just starting in electronics/progamming, the cost/benefit ratio for the Arduino platform is pretty tough to beat.

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, April 2, 2018, 12:10:59 PM EDT, James Lynes <jmlynesjr@...> wrote:


Jerry:

"The Arduino environment is not a bad choice if wishing to start on the path
toward becoming a hardware or software engineer."

I'm torn on this....necessary but not sufficient....

The economics are certainly great compared to the $100K DG Supernova I started out on. And C/C++ looks pretty much the same across platforms compared to the dozens of different assembly languages of the "good old days". The Arduino abstraction runs across a range of processors, 8bit Atmel, 32bit Microchip, and various 32bit ARM processor implementations. So there's a wide range of speed and memory options. An issue is that libraries that bypass the abstraction (access the processor's registers directly) for speed, byte-wide I/O, direct memory access, or other reasons won't be compatible across processors.

The setup() / loop() construct is easy to grasp, but the lack of Tasking causes a lot of hoop jumping with state machines/timing loops to simulate tasks. It's hard to debug timing issues. At some point you will have to use interrupts and a realtime scheduler/OS.

That said, I know of an entire theme park that was run on Intel Multibus 8085 8bit processors and C with all the real work done in a loop() type structure with a background task that only printed error messages.

Some really interesting projects can be done in the Arduino environment, but to cross over into the professional realtime programming world requires a lot more education.

James