Date   
Re: #ubitx replaced Arduino Nano gives a lot of I2C interference during reception #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

Very cool, sounds like you added a 4mhz crystal filter for CW in parallel with 
the 12mhz crystal filter for SSB as suggested by Farhan here:
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/36041
Further discussion here:
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/36549
    https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/36947

You might describe exactly what you found to work, posting code and schematics.
Maybe a quick description of what crystals you used and how they were matched.
Did this in any noticeable way affect performance when using the 12mhz SSB filter?
There's a bunch of CW operators in the forum who might be interested in
duplicating your efforts.

Jerry, KE7ER 

  

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 02:42 am, Alex - PA1FOX wrote:
Hi ubitx fans,

This is a follow up from my original message of February 22nd. 

I finally managed to find the root cause of the interference. Having replaced the Nano serveral times, the SI5351 Adafruit breakout board and ending up building half of the digital circuit next to the ubitx in breadboard style. I then eliminated all functions in the firmware of the nano one by one to figure out if I just could set the frequency on the display and the SI5351 without any interference. This worked.

The cause was a software issue. I have added a menu function to change the CW band width from wide to narrow and back. During all the test work I had not linked this software addition to the noise I got in the receiver. During the tuning process, at every frequency change, the function was called and set the correct  IF oscillator frequency to 4Mhz or 12Mhz (dependant on wide or narrow). As this frequency was set again and again with every tuning step this was causing the audio clicks. I now changed the function to check if the frequency is already correct and need not to be set again.

All clicks gone. Pfew, that one got me puzzled for quite some weeks. As often, the issue and solution are very simple as soon as you've discovered them.

I will throw in a youtube video shortly showing the effect of wide and narrow in CW with the ubitx. it's huge!

73, Alex
PA1FOX

Re: New RF AGC modification #ubitx

Don, ND6T
 

Indeed there was. Thank You!
The new graphic sketch had the relay labels reversed from Rx to Antenna. Schematic and text were correct, as were the graphics in the RF Gain pages. I just got turned around and TOTALLY missed it. All is corrected now. I hope. Good eye!
73,
Don

Re: Coding styles

Jack, W8TEE
 

OMG! I built one of the Altair's for a friend and had to program it to test whether I had built it correctly. For those who don't know, those switches are for setting the binary bits for each byte of the program. When you had that byte set, you hit a "Deposit" switch which moved that byte into RAM. You could tell early Altair programmers by the "binary blisters" on their index finger!

Jack, W8TEE


On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 9:40:35 AM EDT, John P <j.m.price@...> wrote:


Here are some of the early computers I dealt with. #1 at Stevens Tech, the Univac 1105; a big room full of 12AX7s!




In my early days at AT&T, the Datapoint 2200. A discrete component version of the Intel 8008! Ours had a 9-track tape drive!





Later at AT&T, the TRS-80





And of course, I had one of these at home:



I saw somewhere online that someone has an Arduino based version of it; even looks the same!

--
John - WA2FZW

Re: SWR

Kees T
 

Can't wait to see the FDIM presentation detail or other JackAl schematic/functional detail. 

BUT......I'm still focused on the minimalist approach  What can I do for the most function and least cost and minimum UBITX ripup.

73 Kees K5BCQ

Re: Coding styles

Jim Sheldon
 

The terminal looks like a Friden "Flex-O-Writer".  Had one of those once a HUGE number of years ago - LOL

W0EB

------ Original Message ------
From: "John P" <j.m.price@...>
Sent: 5/9/2018 8:40:16 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Coding styles

Here are some of the early computers I dealt with. #1 at Stevens Tech, the Univac 1105; a big room full of 12AX7s!




In my early days at AT&T, the Datapoint 2200. A discrete component version of the Intel 8008! Ours had a 9-track tape drive!



--
John - WA2FZW
_._,_._,_


Re: SWR

Jack, W8TEE
 

We were going to put an SWR meter on the JackAl board, but have backed away from it for this iteration. The main reason was because of the board size. The nano-acres it would take on the board would raise the PCB cost above the 100x100mm size to do it right for the possible power levels that might be involved. That doesn't mean you can't add one...

The good news: Right now, there are about a dozen "empty" pins available on the board for experimenting. We are currently using less that 15% of the 1MB of flash memory and less than 10% of the 256K of SRAM, and that includes code space for some features that we've coded for (e.g., a RTC) but have not implemented yet (e.g, adding a button battery to power the Teeny's RTC in sleep mode). The Teensy is a 3.3V device, so we have an onboard regulators for 5V and 3.3V. Al and I think this will up the "fun level" for hackers considerably...at least that's our intention.

The bad news: We got caught in some kind of Chinese holiday and other "delays" to get the PCB. Al ordered the board since he did all the work on the EE design. It seems our Beta PCB order got pushed to the back of the line. When I wrote to them and pointed out that I was disappointed in their service, especially after ordering more than 1000 boards from them last year, our order suddenly went from "In line" to "shipped" in less than 24 hours. I was a little more than PO'ed, but at least we got the board this week. We discovered several errors on the board (2 ours, 1 theirs), so the Beta board will have some "hairs" on it. Long story short, we will be demoing JackAl at FDIM, but not all of the features will be implemented. The order for the new board will be sent this week, and I think it will be done in a more "timely" fashion this time. We'll immediately send it to our Beta testers and then make it available via an announcement here.

Al and I look forward to seeing some of you at FDIM!

Jack, W8TEE


On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 9:49:27 AM EDT, Kees T <windy10605@...> wrote:


I think Jack, W8TEE, is waiting for FDIM to tell us all the correct way to solve the problem.

Just found an article from January 2011 QST which uses LF398N parts and a PIC16F876A by Bill Kaune, W7IEQ.

73 Kees K5BCQ

uBITX for sale - in Circuit Specialists Case #ubitx

Jim Sheldon
 

Selling one of my earlier, completed uBITX Radios to make room for a new one.  This one has the N5IB RadI2Cino card in it and the NANO is loaded with the latest public release of the W0EB/W2CTX I2C 2 line display software, V4.01R.  The instructions for operating this software with the radio are located under "Documentation files" in the W0EB/W2CTX files section of my website - w0eb.com.
The radio is serial# 324/1 and has the good FTC audio chip in it. It is built into one of the (discontinued) Circuit Specialists extruded aluminum cases, has a broadcast band interference filter installed.  It puts out almost 9 watts on 40 meters with the original factory setting.  The LCD is a white on blue I2C (address 0X27) 2 by 16 display with an attractive bezel and the extra push button switches plus the extra hand key jack has been installed.  The CW Keyer works very well as the software keyer is interrupt driven.  There is a remote programming/CAT jack for the NANO on the back panel.  Calibration against WWV is very close to right on. The AGC and pop removal mods have NOT been done to this one.

I am asking $175 plus shipping for this radio.  Prefer to ship just in the US but will ship internationally.  The international shipping might be pretty steep though as well as the customs/VAT charges for some countries.  The only method of payment that will be accepted is US Postal Money Order or PayPal from a US buyer and ONLY PayPal from an international buyer.  US Shipping will be by USPS Medium Flat Rate box (Approximately $14.00).  International shipping will depend on country and weight.  The actual weight of the radio outside of packing is about 2.5 pounds.

Contact me via the email link on my website (bottom of the page http://www.w0eb.com) if you are interested. 

Jim Sheldon, W0EB

Re: For those keeping track of uBITX shipping times #ubitx

Dennis dEntremont
 

Ordered mine on April 20th, shipped May 2nd, arrived here in Nova Scotia at my QTH on May 7th.

Very happy with the turn around time and the packaging. I have not yet set it up as I am waiting for my enclosure and don't have a lot of spare time right now.



On 2018-05-09 12:38 AM, Tom Christian wrote:
uBITx #2 arrived today in 8 days.  Swapped it out with #1 to test and it worked fine for a QSO on 20 meters.  Good deal.  Fast!
Tom
AB7WT

Re: #ubitx #ubitx

Joe Holland
 

I actually removed the jack.. and just ugly bugged the resistor.. still no joy.. 

73 de Joe KB5VJY

Re: Coding styles

Doug W
 

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 06:40 am, John P wrote:
I saw somewhere online that someone has an Arduino based version of it; even looks the same!

https://www.altairduino.com/product/altair-8800-emulator-kit/
  You can buy a kit of the Arduino version for about 1/3 of what Ed Roberts was charging.
https://www.hackster.io/david-hansel/arduino-altair-8800-simulator-3594a6  

 
--
www.bitxmap.com

Re: Thunderbolt and lightning, very, very frightening me

Steve Black <kb1chu@...>
 

I had a 40 foot well grounded tower on my previous home. Right beside the tower was a shorter masonary chimney for a gas water heater. Lightning struck the chimney causing the top section to vaporize. The tower and radios that were connected to it had no damage. It made no sense to me at all. Several years earlier another strike hit the tower and vaporized the VHF/UHF vertical and its coax right to the grounded entrance panel. Again no radios were damaged. That time the chimney was untouched. My electrician friend said having a tower was like making an obscene gesture at mother nature. Steve kb1chu



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Jack Purdum via Groups.Io" <jjpurdum@...>
Date: 5/9/18 9:27 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Thunderbolt and lightning, very, very frightening me

I remember a picture (QST I think) of the back of a house that was struck by lightning. The tower was on the left side and it looked like someone had taken black paint and painted perfectly straight lines all over the back of the house. What actually happened was the bolt super-heated the water in the plumbing, exploding the pipes under the pressure, taking the siding off the house like it was a chain saw. Scary.

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, May 8, 2018, 11:30:15 PM EDT, Matthew Stevens <matthew@...> wrote:


Back in 2012 my next door neighbors maple tree was hit. It ran down the tree into the ground. To the north it ran along the galvanized water line where it blew the water meter and a chunk of the curbing across the street. To the south, it ran towards the house, jumped across the 8’ wide concrete porch into the DOORBELL BUTTON.... blew a 4” hole in the concrete block wall, burnt all the interior house wiring (like, black scorched marks on the walls), shattering light bulbs and burning up light switches etc. burned the breaker panel out behind the house. It went from there into the phone line... to the pole in the street where it blew the cover off the 1940s era lead telephone junction box (found that down the street about 30yards).

Went into my house via the phone line from that pole, tripped GFCIs in the back of the house, broke two light bulbs in the ceiling, and then through the cable line fried the cable modem-and literally scorched the on-board NIC off the motherboard on my fileserver which was connected directly to the modem/router. So yeah... I have a healthy respect for lightning :-)

My radio in the front of the house was unplugged at the time - and fine. Not to say that a nearby strike can’t cause issues even with an unplugged rig. But I think it’s better than leaving it plugged in. At least it makes me feel better even if it’s not accomplishing anything haha.

73,
- Matthew nj4y


On May 8, 2018, at 16:53, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:

I've worked with shelters and all for land mobile.  They are ringed underground with rods and wires,
same with surfaces and corners and then everything that goes into teh building is though a copper
plate with with polyphasor or similar before it geto to anything inside. IT's bonded to the tower with
copper straps usually wide like 4 to 6 inches and more than one.  They can take a direct hit.

Many years before a AM BC station.  You have the filed with the 120 wire ground plane,
ground rods most 12ft abound.  Tower is up on insulators for base feed but thereis an
arc gap from each leg spaced maybe 3 inches  the feed sire goes to the load coil in the
doghouse next to the base and that has straps to ground for RF and sparks.   The feed lines
are arranged to arc ro ground before the TX shed.  Been there during a storm, the
sparks are impressive and frightening.  About 1 in 10 caused the big 5kw RCA to shut down
usually a reset of breakers was all it took to start running the heaters(tubes) then B+ and
the modulator.  About twice a year the power company feed was a problem so we were
1KW off genset backup.

Me I've gotten hit twice one direct to the house antenna, fried the #6 wire to BBs and
much of the electronics in the house.  Second time it hit a pole down the hill before
it went underground about a mile away the surge got me, mostly minor.

The big thing is to protect so two things happen.  You do not burn the house down.
Your insurance then will cover any damage (or they do their best to weasel out).
Complying with NEC code is more for the prevention of insurance issues.

Call me pragmatic.  Prepare for the worst be, happy if it doesn't happen.

Allison

Re: SWR

Kees T
 

I think Jack, W8TEE, is waiting for FDIM to tell us all the correct way to solve the problem.

Just found an article from January 2011 QST which uses LF398N parts and a PIC16F876A by Bill Kaune, W7IEQ.

73 Kees K5BCQ

Re: Coding styles

John P
 

Here are some of the early computers I dealt with. #1 at Stevens Tech, the Univac 1105; a big room full of 12AX7s!




In my early days at AT&T, the Datapoint 2200. A discrete component version of the Intel 8008! Ours had a 9-track tape drive!





Later at AT&T, the TRS-80





And of course, I had one of these at home:



I saw somewhere online that someone has an Arduino based version of it; even looks the same!

--
John - WA2FZW

Re: Removing solder resist.

K9HZ <bill@...>
 

Well not all solder masks are created the same. That said acetone or toluene will work on some, water and orange oil in others.  Some is polymer based and must be scraped off. 


Dr. William J. Schmidt - K9HZ J68HZ 8P6HK ZF2HZ PJ4/K9HZ VP5/K9HZ PJ2/K9HZ

 

Owner - Operator

Big Signal Ranch – K9ZC

Staunton, Illinois

 

Owner – Operator

Villa Grand Piton - J68HZ

Soufriere, St. Lucia W.I.

Rent it: www.VillaGrandPiton.com


email:  bill@...

 


On May 9, 2018, at 6:56 AM, MAX <max@...> wrote:

Does anyone have a good trick for removing solder resist from a PC board?  Scraping at it with an exacto knife seems a bit clumsy and I have never been able to leave a neat looking exposed copper area behind.

Regards.

Max K 4 O D S.

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/




Re: Thunderbolt and lightning, very, very frightening me

Jack, W8TEE
 

I remember a picture (QST I think) of the back of a house that was struck by lightning. The tower was on the left side and it looked like someone had taken black paint and painted perfectly straight lines all over the back of the house. What actually happened was the bolt super-heated the water in the plumbing, exploding the pipes under the pressure, taking the siding off the house like it was a chain saw. Scary.

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, May 8, 2018, 11:30:15 PM EDT, Matthew Stevens <matthew@...> wrote:


Back in 2012 my next door neighbors maple tree was hit. It ran down the tree into the ground. To the north it ran along the galvanized water line where it blew the water meter and a chunk of the curbing across the street. To the south, it ran towards the house, jumped across the 8’ wide concrete porch into the DOORBELL BUTTON.... blew a 4” hole in the concrete block wall, burnt all the interior house wiring (like, black scorched marks on the walls), shattering light bulbs and burning up light switches etc. burned the breaker panel out behind the house. It went from there into the phone line... to the pole in the street where it blew the cover off the 1940s era lead telephone junction box (found that down the street about 30yards).

Went into my house via the phone line from that pole, tripped GFCIs in the back of the house, broke two light bulbs in the ceiling, and then through the cable line fried the cable modem-and literally scorched the on-board NIC off the motherboard on my fileserver which was connected directly to the modem/router. So yeah... I have a healthy respect for lightning :-)

My radio in the front of the house was unplugged at the time - and fine. Not to say that a nearby strike can’t cause issues even with an unplugged rig. But I think it’s better than leaving it plugged in. At least it makes me feel better even if it’s not accomplishing anything haha.

73,
- Matthew nj4y


On May 8, 2018, at 16:53, ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...> wrote:

I've worked with shelters and all for land mobile.  They are ringed underground with rods and wires,
same with surfaces and corners and then everything that goes into teh building is though a copper
plate with with polyphasor or similar before it geto to anything inside. IT's bonded to the tower with
copper straps usually wide like 4 to 6 inches and more than one.  They can take a direct hit.

Many years before a AM BC station.  You have the filed with the 120 wire ground plane,
ground rods most 12ft abound.  Tower is up on insulators for base feed but thereis an
arc gap from each leg spaced maybe 3 inches  the feed sire goes to the load coil in the
doghouse next to the base and that has straps to ground for RF and sparks.   The feed lines
are arranged to arc ro ground before the TX shed.  Been there during a storm, the
sparks are impressive and frightening.  About 1 in 10 caused the big 5kw RCA to shut down
usually a reset of breakers was all it took to start running the heaters(tubes) then B+ and
the modulator.  About twice a year the power company feed was a problem so we were
1KW off genset backup.

Me I've gotten hit twice one direct to the house antenna, fried the #6 wire to BBs and
much of the electronics in the house.  Second time it hit a pole down the hill before
it went underground about a mile away the surge got me, mostly minor.

The big thing is to protect so two things happen.  You do not burn the house down.
Your insurance then will cover any damage (or they do their best to weasel out).
Complying with NEC code is more for the prevention of insurance issues.

Call me pragmatic.  Prepare for the worst be, happy if it doesn't happen.

Allison

Re: Coding styles

Jack, W8TEE
 

This is pretty much how my computer looked. I built another 6 of them for a computer lab we started in the College of Business at Butler University, used mostly for business modeling with Lotus 1-2-3. This was in the late 1970's. Most were 8K models, but mine at home was a heavy-weight: 16K!

Inline image


Jack, W8TEE


On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 12:05:09 AM EDT, John Lauber <jlauber@...> wrote:


How nice to find another SOL-20 builder.  I bought the bare board kit from Processor Tech in ca ’75 or ’76 and built/added things around it…keyboard, composite video monitor, tape deck (cassette, that is), enclosure and a Model 28 typing unit as a printer.  I could only afford a 4K S100 memory board, so that was all I had for memory.  Lived in the Bay Area at the time, worked at NASA Ames, went to the Home Brew Computer Club meetings at SLAC, and frequented the various surplus electronics houses in Mt View and Sunnyvale.  I remember the first Byte Shop, and always went to the Computer Faires.  And I cut my computing teeth in the early 70s on a PDP-9 when the Navy sent me to Maynard to learn assembly language programming for same.   Oh, those were the days!

 

Thanks for reminding me of those glorious times.

 

John

WI6P

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jack Purdum via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, May 7, 2018 07:17
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Coding styles

 

Yep. My first computer was a SOL-20 kit with a modified Hitachi TV for a monitor. I knew Leor Zollman when he was a student at MIT quite well and tried to get him to add floating point to his BDS (Brain-Dead Software) C compiler. (My company sold a statistics package called Microstat and I wanted to convert it to C. The Whitesmith's compiler floating point was so slow, it was not viable.) He didn't have time, so we wrote our own full C compiler (i.e., with fp and structures). We demo-ed the C version Microstat at a show in Chicago and we were surprised to find out that more people wanted to know about the compiler we used than Microstat. So we started selling the Eco-C88 C compiler. It was the first C compiler with an IDE (yes, even before Turbo C) that had the editor, compiler, assembler, and linker all in one package. Back then, most C compilers gave error messages like: "Error 507:323", and you had to look up what error 507 was at line 323. Our IDE had an error window at the bottom of the screen that would say something like: "Duplicate definition error for comPort at line 323. P54." The "P54 was a page number in the C Programming Guide book where you could go for a discussion of what the error was.

 

Fun times...


Jack, W8TEE

 

 

On Monday, May 7, 2018, 1:44:42 AM EDT, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:

 

 

64x16? K&R?? Surely, you are not talking floppy shuffle on the Xerox 820 or (jerry pournelle, peace be upon him) a Kaypro?

BDS C was the only game in town. I brought up a CP/M system for my undergraduate project work. 

- f

- f

 

On Mon, 7 May 2018, 09:44 Jack Purdum via Groups.Io, <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The brace thing is really a matter of choice. I learned C back in the late 1970's when K&R was the only C book and I had a 64x16 modified TV for a CRT, so I put things on the same line, simply so I could see more lines without scrolling:

 

   if (w == 5) {

      y = true;

   } else {

      y = false;

   }

 

Even though the braces are not required with a single statement, I almost always use them. When I don't, invariably I need to add another statement or a debug print statement, so I have to add the brace anyway. However, with function signatures, I always place the opening brace for the function body on a new line. I think people pick what works for them. No one style is "correct", so, to me at least, there's no reason to even debate what's correct when it comes to braces. However, we should all try to make our code as readable as possible.

 

When I was in high school, the football coach knew I was a ham radio operator and wanted me to build two Heathkit walkie talkies. I built them, and they didn't work. I was mortified. I barely slept that night. The next morning, my Mom told me I got up in the middle of the night and wrote something on the pad next to the phone. I read what I wrote, went downstairs and checked it and, sure enough, that was the problem. Ever since then, I keep a pad and pencil next to the bed. I can't tell you how many teaching examples I've used that came from that pad or programming problems that were solved by reading the pad the next morning. My experiences have convinced me that your brain continues to problem solve even when you're asleep.


Jack, W8TEE

 

 

On Sunday, May 6, 2018, 11:51:40 PM EDT, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

 

 

You guys take this so seriously.
Maybe you should find a hobby.   ;-)

Though I understand, I'm afflicted by the same malady.
Just a slightly different strain.
Here's a fix, no need to ever again deal with my coding style (one of many possible tools):
    http://uncrustify.sourceforge.net/ 

If you object to K&R style, there's a lot of it out there for you to sic crustify on.
Here's a few million lines to get you started:
    https://github.com/torvalds/linux

> You can also use Ctrl-T to format your code to a common C coding style.

I assume that's for the Arduino IDE, whose editor I mostly avoid.
Here's various tricks for vi/vim users:
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2355834/how-can-i-autoformat-indent-c-code-in-vim

Here's a discussion of the various indentation styles:
    https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/99543/what-is-the-difference-between-kr-and-one-true-brace-style-1tbs-styles
They can't agree either.
But somebody in there did a study of error rates in code using the various styles.
Note that K&R style won, at least by a little bit.
Though perhaps that's because folks using the K&R style
are more likely to have read K&R (highly recommended).

I was quite serious about that back pocket thing.
If I have a difficult algorithm to work on, I code it tight so I can see
as much of the work at one time as possible.  Preferably so it all fits
on one side of a sheet of typing paper.  Better yet, half of one side.
Then pull it out at odd times during the day, jot notes when new insights come.
Works for me.

Didn't anybody have any comments about on how better to compute SWR? 

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 05:31 pm, Jack Purdum wrote:

Braces or brackets? Braces mark statement/function blocks while brackets are most often used with array sizes. The old K&R style was to leave the opening brace on the same line as the expression block, and then align the closing brace with the expression block start. I think that was done to get more lines on the screen when a 25 line display was common. Today, most seem to place the opening brace on its own line. If the block spans more than a page, the latest IDE shows the opening expression.

 

You can also use Ctrl-T to format your code to a common C coding style.

 

Re: CEC firmware dual display

Ian Lee
 

Richard

Please refer to the link below.
http://www.hamskey.com/2018/04/various-lcd-support-in-ubitx-with.html

If you are using an I2C LCD, you can connect another I2C LCD in parallel.
Only the I2C address needs to be set differently.

You can set Primary LCD and Secondary LCD in uBITX Manager.
If you want to change the Primary and Secondary LCD position while using Dual LCD, you only need to set it in uBITX Manager.

If you have not yet upgraded the firmware to Version 1.073, please wait a moment.  preparing to release Version 1.075 Beta now.
I recommend upgrading to Version 1.075.

Ian KD8CEC

2018-05-08 0:17 GMT+09:00 Richard E Neese <kb3vgw@...>:

on the kd8cec firmware I see it allows for dual display can it be the parallel and a i2c and is there a page on how to enable and setup dual display ?



--
Best 73
KD8CEC / Ph.D ian lee
kd8cec@...
www.hamskey.com (my blog)

Antenna Analyzer

Arvo W0VRA
 

Since BITX users often homebrew antennas, analyzers are popular.

I was excited to learn that I could analyze an antenna using the noise bridge from QRP guys and my SDR:

https://qrpguys.com/k7qo-noise-bridge

Then I realized that software was not trivial.

SDRPlay is getting ready to release analyzer software!

https://www.sdrplay.com/new-spectrum-analyser-function-for-rsps-alpha-release-later-in-may/

So if you have an SDRPlay receiver and a noise bridge, you should be able to do all kinds of interesting things.

Re: Removing solder resist.

Rien van der Vorm
 

We user Isopropanol alcohol,  it is avalable as spray then it is called Flux remover.
Greetings Rien PA3GAG 


Verzonden vanaf Samsung-tablet.


-------- Oorspronkelijk bericht --------
Van: MAX <max@...>
Datum: 09-05-18 13:57 (GMT+01:00)
Aan: BITX20@groups.io
Onderwerp: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

Does anyone have a good trick for removing solder resist from a PC board?  Scraping at it with an exacto knife seems a bit clumsy and I have never been able to leave a neat looking exposed copper area behind.

Regards.

Max K 4 O D S.

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/




Re: #ubitx #ubitx

Michael Maiorana
 

Perhaps the paddle jack is shorting to ground internally? If you checked the resistors, I would replace the jack and see what happens.
Good luck
Mike M.
KU4QO

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 5:02 AM, Joe Holland <kb5vjy@...> wrote:
Perplexing problem... I started keying up cw on my UBitX upon turning it on with no key plugged in.. I checked my 4.7k pull up resistor, and it is fine... I can unplug the digital connector, everything powers up and no key.. I plug in the digital connector and it keys up in CW.. I pulled my blue and green wires off of the tip connector off of the CW plug, had my 4.7k resistor between.. sending CW

Any pointers before I dig in..

73 n TNX de joe KB5VJY k