Date   

Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Roderick Hart
 

Jack are you going to provide a compiler like some of the training books did years ago. I learned at Bell Labs Training center in Piscataway. I used a CPM Microsoft compiler at home to really learn the language, but it was important to have an environment consistent with the tools used in training. The other really significant aid is to have the examples and exercises on a disk.

I was never a programmer but I for almost 20 years managed Unix operation and maintenance in a bell operating company. It was very helpful to know and understand what my people did. I completed all of the Bell Lab Desec


From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 9:52:49 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Beta Readers, closed!
 
Hi Bob:

Just about anything a ham might want to do can be done with "pure" C. Someone once said C allows you plenty of room to shoot yourself in the foot, and that's very true. However, C++ let's you blow your entire leg off. Some languages (e.g., Java) don't trust you so they do run-time checks (read: slow everything down) or don't give you those things that add power to the language (i.e., pointers). Java is C with training wheels. I try to use the C++ concept of encapsulation in my day-to-day C code, and I like the concept of polymorphism. However, inheritance offers a lot of ways to screw things up if you truly don't understand the language. For someone who wants to augment a hobby, C is more than good enough. However, because the Arduino libraries are written in C++ for the most part, the new book also has a chapter on C++, but with a better explanation of it...I think...than the current Beginning C book does. Adding more processors just made sense, too. So, I'm really interested in helping those who want to "make" something and see C as a component in doing that. I'll steal from C++ those things I think make someone a better C programmer. Above all, however, the journey should still be a fun one.

Jack, W8TEE



On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 3:48:32 PM EDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Jack, I've heard of C, and others like C+ and C++ which I assume are refinements of the basic C. Is this also your intention, to introduce basic C plus some enhancements? Just curious.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:39 AM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

My first C-language book was K&R (Kernighan & Ritchie) "The C Programming Language" in 1778.  
I still have a copy that Denis Ritchie signed for me at Bell Labs.  After that there were a plethora of 
new C-Language books, including yours.  Some were very good (yours) and some were not so good.
Thanks for the good work and for introducing many new programmers to C.  Other languages have 
come and gone, but C seems to be the basis that we still rely on for a high level language that can,
if necessary, get down and dirty at the machine language level.

 Arv
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:05 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff:

Yes, I have considered that. I wrote my first C book in 1982. It went through 3 editions and sold over 237,000 copies. It was also translated into 10 foreign languages, including Chinese, but I have no records on those sales. (Translation rights are a single-payment right-of-transfer.) BTW, as a frame of reference, a technical book that sells out the first printing (usually 5,000-10,000 copies) is considered a success.

This new book is my 20th programming book and is the distillation of 40 years of using C and over 30 years of teaching C plus owning a company that produced the first C compiler with an IDE. (Yep, even before Borland.) As to:
   
        I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I
        thought was self-standing. Most products made today put ease-of- learning and
        use as a nice-to-have option.

seems like a comment that is a bit harsh and painted with a too-wide brush. Perhaps you just aren't reading the right books?

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:52:59 PM EDT, Jeff Debes <jeff.debes@...> wrote:


Best of luck ......but  its a very tall order to write anything on that subject  that everyone can understand.
 People have different minds, abilities  and very different styles of learning .
Have you considered that the design of ‘C’ itself is cryptic and may never be easy for most to learn?   
I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I thought was self-standing.
Most products made today put ease-of- learning and use as a nice-to-have option.
But again, good luck with the effort.

Jeff Debes
AC2JB 






On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


All:

Is this a great group of people or what? Almost 100 individuals offered their time to help read my new intro C book. To everyone one, thank you!

There is no way that I can read and do justice to the comments from 100 readers, so I need to shut down the volunteer Beta readers appeal and consider it closed. I will likely thin the number to perhaps a dozen or so readers. I'll do this in the next two days.

Again, thank you for your support...it is sincerely appreciated.

73,
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

Hi Bob:

Just about anything a ham might want to do can be done with "pure" C. Someone once said C allows you plenty of room to shoot yourself in the foot, and that's very true. However, C++ let's you blow your entire leg off. Some languages (e.g., Java) don't trust you so they do run-time checks (read: slow everything down) or don't give you those things that add power to the language (i.e., pointers). Java is C with training wheels. I try to use the C++ concept of encapsulation in my day-to-day C code, and I like the concept of polymorphism. However, inheritance offers a lot of ways to screw things up if you truly don't understand the language. For someone who wants to augment a hobby, C is more than good enough. However, because the Arduino libraries are written in C++ for the most part, the new book also has a chapter on C++, but with a better explanation of it...I think...than the current Beginning C book does. Adding more processors just made sense, too. So, I'm really interested in helping those who want to "make" something and see C as a component in doing that. I'll steal from C++ those things I think make someone a better C programmer. Above all, however, the journey should still be a fun one.

Jack, W8TEE



On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 3:48:32 PM EDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Jack, I've heard of C, and others like C+ and C++ which I assume are refinements of the basic C. Is this also your intention, to introduce basic C plus some enhancements? Just curious.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:39 AM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

My first C-language book was K&R (Kernighan & Ritchie) "The C Programming Language" in 1778.  
I still have a copy that Denis Ritchie signed for me at Bell Labs.  After that there were a plethora of 
new C-Language books, including yours.  Some were very good (yours) and some were not so good.
Thanks for the good work and for introducing many new programmers to C.  Other languages have 
come and gone, but C seems to be the basis that we still rely on for a high level language that can,
if necessary, get down and dirty at the machine language level.

 Arv
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:05 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff:

Yes, I have considered that. I wrote my first C book in 1982. It went through 3 editions and sold over 237,000 copies. It was also translated into 10 foreign languages, including Chinese, but I have no records on those sales. (Translation rights are a single-payment right-of-transfer.) BTW, as a frame of reference, a technical book that sells out the first printing (usually 5,000-10,000 copies) is considered a success.

This new book is my 20th programming book and is the distillation of 40 years of using C and over 30 years of teaching C plus owning a company that produced the first C compiler with an IDE. (Yep, even before Borland.) As to:
   
        I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I
        thought was self-standing. Most products made today put ease-of- learning and
        use as a nice-to-have option.

seems like a comment that is a bit harsh and painted with a too-wide brush. Perhaps you just aren't reading the right books?

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:52:59 PM EDT, Jeff Debes <jeff.debes@...> wrote:


Best of luck ......but  its a very tall order to write anything on that subject  that everyone can understand.
 People have different minds, abilities  and very different styles of learning .
Have you considered that the design of ‘C’ itself is cryptic and may never be easy for most to learn?   
I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I thought was self-standing.
Most products made today put ease-of- learning and use as a nice-to-have option.
But again, good luck with the effort.

Jeff Debes
AC2JB 






On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


All:

Is this a great group of people or what? Almost 100 individuals offered their time to help read my new intro C book. To everyone one, thank you!

There is no way that I can read and do justice to the comments from 100 readers, so I need to shut down the volunteer Beta readers appeal and consider it closed. I will likely thin the number to perhaps a dozen or so readers. I'll do this in the next two days.

Again, thank you for your support...it is sincerely appreciated.

73,
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

FWIW, I'm working on a CAT interface for Hans' QCX. Had a setback when a shelf collapsed on the QCX and had to replace it. I would suggest the Teensy 4 for any future software. It has 2MB of flash, 1MB of SRAM, and is clocked at 600Mhz:
Inline image
At a cost of $20, it's worth it. Just my $0.02 worth.

Jack, W8TEE


On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 4:59:19 PM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Now that we have coerced a number of C-programmers to expose 
themselves and their talents, it may be time to start on enhanced 
code for uBITX and similar equipment.  Processors are now 
inexpensively available for small things to large fast things.  What is 
holding us back, other than old age and age related malise?

Arv  K7HKL
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 2:30 PM Dean Souleles <dsouleles@...> wrote:
Jack and all -

I was going to mention my battered copy of K&R as well - but got beaten to the punch. 

Old programmers never die, they just inherit new attributes.

I mentioned this in another thread - being derived from C is most of what is wrong (and much of what is right) with almost all modern programming languages - weak (non-existent) typing, difficult to read, obscure, non-deterministic syntax, odd constructs, lack of memory management and, as others have noted, many parts of the language are "weak beyond repair".  

And yet we love it because we have it.  And if you pay attention to W8TEE you can write good, maintainable code in C and all its derivatives.

It is just way too easy to write atrocious code..

Now don't get me started on C++

Dean
KK4DAS
 


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Gordon Gibby
 

Different strokes for different folks!
This is just not your cup of tea 
Find something different, MoveOn and enjoy yourself.   


On Jun 23, 2020, at 16:12, Stephen KO4CVU <goinfishin1952@...> wrote:

Alex,
If you haven't already, make a "perfect pitch" with the Baofeng microphone. (That's when you throw it and it goes straight to the bottom of the trash can without touching the sides.) Buy a CB microphone with a built-in preamplifier. It made a big improvement on my SSB phone output, but I have not been able to achieve the power output that  Ashhar says he can get (see his post #48203.)
Stephen


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Richard West <rewest71@...>
 

Well Bob,

I have a defective G1M doorstop in the box. It had experienced a catastrophic power event, among other manufacturing problems. Mailed it back to China, only to get the same radio on the doorstep just as broken as when it was shipped USPS for $85.00. Been there, done that, but not again. Spent more time in transit than in the shack.
There is a UBITx V4 of mine that is physically in bits and pieces in the junk box zipped into a ziplock bag. Became so frustrated with all the time, effort, energy, and money spent it became a job, not a hobby. It never worked right, even though help was requested, and received. 

Still think of the countless, fruitless hours spent on that unit with many regrets. Have moved on to an HW-8, with the HWA-7-1, or use the TS-440SAT with power dialed down to 10 watts with satisfaction. 

The equipment we use is like anything else, we make informed decisions, and then make choices.

73,
Wes/KH2EE


Re: Anyone used the ELEKITSORPARTS digital interface board? Opionons? #ubitx #digital

Kyle Litz <bigoilny@...>
 

N0YWB
I have the same version.  Is it possible for you to share a closeup of the wires you attached to the pad and then to where you sent them?  The directions for this build are less than ideal and like so many others, I'm a hobbyist, not professional electronic guy.  My schematic skills are way worse than par. :)  Thanks in advance.

Kyle
K4LEL


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Arv Evans
 

Now that we have coerced a number of C-programmers to expose 
themselves and their talents, it may be time to start on enhanced 
code for uBITX and similar equipment.  Processors are now 
inexpensively available for small things to large fast things.  What is 
holding us back, other than old age and age related malise?

Arv  K7HKL
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 2:30 PM Dean Souleles <dsouleles@...> wrote:
Jack and all -

I was going to mention my battered copy of K&R as well - but got beaten to the punch. 

Old programmers never die, they just inherit new attributes.

I mentioned this in another thread - being derived from C is most of what is wrong (and much of what is right) with almost all modern programming languages - weak (non-existent) typing, difficult to read, obscure, non-deterministic syntax, odd constructs, lack of memory management and, as others have noted, many parts of the language are "weak beyond repair".  

And yet we love it because we have it.  And if you pay attention to W8TEE you can write good, maintainable code in C and all its derivatives.

It is just way too easy to write atrocious code..

Now don't get me started on C++

Dean
KK4DAS
 


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Dean Souleles
 

Jack and all -

I was going to mention my battered copy of K&R as well - but got beaten to the punch. 

Old programmers never die, they just inherit new attributes.

I mentioned this in another thread - being derived from C is most of what is wrong (and much of what is right) with almost all modern programming languages - weak (non-existent) typing, difficult to read, obscure, non-deterministic syntax, odd constructs, lack of memory management and, as others have noted, many parts of the language are "weak beyond repair".  

And yet we love it because we have it.  And if you pay attention to W8TEE you can write good, maintainable code in C and all its derivatives.

It is just way too easy to write atrocious code..

Now don't get me started on C++

Dean
KK4DAS
 


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Stephen KO4CVU
 

Alex,
If you haven't already, make a "perfect pitch" with the Baofeng microphone. (That's when you throw it and it goes straight to the bottom of the trash can without touching the sides.) Buy a CB microphone with a built-in preamplifier. It made a big improvement on my SSB phone output, but I have not been able to achieve the power output that  Ashhar says he can get (see his post #48203.)
Stephen


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Bob Lunsford
 

For me, the problem with a "cheap Chinese rig" is that you have a problem finding schematics for them and I was afraid of using on for a couple of years or so , finding it souring on me and then discovering the "fix" was to buy a new one. I have no proof that the Chinese rigs, like the ones sold by MFJ (the G90 and 5105), have built in obsolescence and don't think they do since a lot of Chinese hams are buying them. And they do have attractive specs. BUT, you learn quickly that if you are budget oriented at all, the V6 is much more rewarding considering what you get for it with price a high priority in the decision.

I like the looks of the full-kited V6 and do enjoy QRP without all the bells and whistles like I did with the HW-7s and -8s. The fact that the V6 can receive AM and SW broadcast stations (zero beating) also is a draw for me.

If/when I win the lottery, it will then that I will take another look at the Chinese offerings.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 3:26:56 PM EDT, Alex Netherton via groups.io <w5alx@...> wrote:


Alls I can say is - wish I had had the same experience. Got m ine for Christmas, have only managed receive so far. Got disgusted in Feb somewhere and stored it before i threw it against a brick wass to "fix" it. Will likely get it back out and see if I can get the BFO and receive notch dialed in. THEN, I will work on bias.
Honestly, I wish I had bought a cheap Chinese rig and just put it on the air.
73 de W5ALX

On 6/23/2020 1:31:55 PM, R. Tyson via groups.io <tysons2@...> wrote:

I got a version 5 late last year. Put it into a case of my own choosing. Fired it up, checked it out and went on to make QSO's with it. Never did need to alter the tuning - it just worked as was. Added a CW filter and it is a great rig.

Why complicate it if you don't need to ? Use it and admire it.

Reg                   G4NFR


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Bob Lunsford
 

Jack, I've heard of C, and others like C+ and C++ which I assume are refinements of the basic C. Is this also your intention, to introduce basic C plus some enhancements? Just curious.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:39 AM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

My first C-language book was K&R (Kernighan & Ritchie) "The C Programming Language" in 1778.  
I still have a copy that Denis Ritchie signed for me at Bell Labs.  After that there were a plethora of 
new C-Language books, including yours.  Some were very good (yours) and some were not so good.
Thanks for the good work and for introducing many new programmers to C.  Other languages have 
come and gone, but C seems to be the basis that we still rely on for a high level language that can,
if necessary, get down and dirty at the machine language level.

 Arv
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:05 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff:

Yes, I have considered that. I wrote my first C book in 1982. It went through 3 editions and sold over 237,000 copies. It was also translated into 10 foreign languages, including Chinese, but I have no records on those sales. (Translation rights are a single-payment right-of-transfer.) BTW, as a frame of reference, a technical book that sells out the first printing (usually 5,000-10,000 copies) is considered a success.

This new book is my 20th programming book and is the distillation of 40 years of using C and over 30 years of teaching C plus owning a company that produced the first C compiler with an IDE. (Yep, even before Borland.) As to:
   
        I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I
        thought was self-standing. Most products made today put ease-of- learning and
        use as a nice-to-have option.

seems like a comment that is a bit harsh and painted with a too-wide brush. Perhaps you just aren't reading the right books?

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:52:59 PM EDT, Jeff Debes <jeff.debes@...> wrote:


Best of luck ......but  its a very tall order to write anything on that subject  that everyone can understand.
 People have different minds, abilities  and very different styles of learning .
Have you considered that the design of ‘C’ itself is cryptic and may never be easy for most to learn?   
I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I thought was self-standing.
Most products made today put ease-of- learning and use as a nice-to-have option.
But again, good luck with the effort.

Jeff Debes
AC2JB 






On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


All:

Is this a great group of people or what? Almost 100 individuals offered their time to help read my new intro C book. To everyone one, thank you!

There is no way that I can read and do justice to the comments from 100 readers, so I need to shut down the volunteer Beta readers appeal and consider it closed. I will likely thin the number to perhaps a dozen or so readers. I'll do this in the next two days.

Again, thank you for your support...it is sincerely appreciated.

73,
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Power supply

Bob Lunsford
 

I agree Bill since it worked for me. I bought a set of VHF kits in the mid-70's and made a 2M repeater, complete with [Root] Beer can cavities. Learned a lot of hands-on technology that stood me good for years. Put to use a lot of studying I did to get the FCC 1st Class  Radiotelephone license. Gave me a gut feeling about a lot of technology that still works for me today re electronics and antennas. The repeater was up for three years and taken down only when moving from TX to KY to continue my studies.

Everyone's taste is in his/her own mouth, however.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:18 AM EDT, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:


Hi Dean,

Some of the value in building stuff does not involve pennies at all. A
lot of other things come our way from building instead of buying. The
pride in doing it may be the smallest benefit.

When I have built and used radio gear I got exactly what I wanted and
left out everything that was not what I wanted. Sometimes what I want is
not on the market or is not available.

I learn a lot more than just the minimum required to get a project
working. In this example of the battery and it's custom charger I get
intimately familiar with how the battery works. I get even more familiar
with how the charger works. If something fails I know right where to look.

As an example of the above - I was using homebrewed gear to participate
in NTS traffic nets. From start to end of moving all the traffic each
day the net lasts a few minutes to a half hour. The final amp tube in my
transmitter was biased class C and used blocked grid keying. It was also
built with mostly junkbox parts. I checked in one evening and spoke for
some traffic meant for my location. And then the plate current needle
slammed up against the pin!. Zero bias on the final. I took the TX to
the shop, found the series resistor lead had broken off, changed out the
resistor, and back on the net in time to get that traffic. You cannot do
that with gear you have not built and understood. Along the way I also
learned about trusting scraps from the junk box:)

Maybe this will change some peoples' accounting systems:) I always
encourage people to build their own stuff if they have the slightest
inclination to do so.

73,

Bill  KU8H

bark less - wag more

On 6/23/20 9:37 AM, Dean Souleles wrote:
> Bob -
>
> If you are interested in Lithium batteries the Talentcells are
> inexpensive and light-weight.  I used a Velcro strap to put on inside my
> uBitx case.  It weighs about 6 ounces and runs the uBitx all day long. 
> The 6 Amp hour version is now only $35 - with charger.  For me, at those
> prices its not worth spending any time to build anything.
>
> Lead acid batteries are so 20th century. :)
>
> Dean
> KK4DAS




DEFECTIVE RADUINO FOR V5

dave <dgclifford@...>
 

IS IT POSSIBLE TO RETURN THE DEFECTIVE RADUINO THAT WAS SUPPLIED WITH MY V5    DAVE C  GW0NVF


Re: Power supply

Bob Lunsford
 

Thanks much for that, Dean. I will check it out. Sounds good.

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 9:37:14 AM EDT, Dean Souleles <dsouleles@...> wrote:


Bob - 

If you are interested in Lithium batteries the Talentcells are inexpensive and light-weight.  I used a Velcro strap to put on inside my uBitx case.  It weighs about 6 ounces and runs the uBitx all day long.   The 6 Amp hour version is now only $35 - with charger.  For me, at those prices its not worth spending any time to build anything. 

Lead acid batteries are so 20th century. :)

Dean
KK4DAS


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Alex Netherton
 

Alls I can say is - wish I had had the same experience. Got m ine for Christmas, have only managed receive so far. Got disgusted in Feb somewhere and stored it before i threw it against a brick wass to "fix" it. Will likely get it back out and see if I can get the BFO and receive notch dialed in. THEN, I will work on bias.
Honestly, I wish I had bought a cheap Chinese rig and just put it on the air.
73 de W5ALX

On 6/23/2020 1:31:55 PM, R. Tyson via groups.io <tysons2@...> wrote:

I got a version 5 late last year. Put it into a case of my own choosing. Fired it up, checked it out and went on to make QSO's with it. Never did need to alter the tuning - it just worked as was. Added a CW filter and it is a great rig.

Why complicate it if you don't need to ? Use it and admire it.

Reg                   G4NFR


Re: Power supply

Jerry Gaffke
 

For portable radio use, lithium ion is ideal.
Very light weight, and you know to stop charging when you reach a specific cell voltage.
And even for our large off grid battery in the basement, a used pack from a battery-electric-vehicle
is now about as cheap per kwh as our L16RE-B lead acid batteries.

> You missed the part about the transistor. It *IS* the load resistor. If I set the transistors up to only allow 100 mA and feed that 100 mA to a dead short then the battery has a 100 mA load on it. The only way there could be more current (100 amps for example) flowing through the battery load is if the transistor fails short. I have been using this exact approach to charge my SLABs (and other batteries). There is a fuse to shut it down if the transistor fails short. It has been in use 25 years for lead-acid batteries. The NiCads and more recently the NiMH are charged the same way but with lower currents. The units all still have their original fuses in place. The NiCads gave me well over ten years service minimum and some even longer. The charge circuit works in reverse of the configuration I described. As an aside, "rapid charging" kills batteries.

OK, using a transistor in the active region to charge or discharge a battery like that is fair enough.
Can probably get by without a feedback network if it doesn't need to be very accurate and the transistor doesn't get too hot. 
Getting 10 years of regular use out of nicads is doing great!
Rapid charging is stressful if pushing the limits, and will definitely kill batteries if the algorithm and sensors are not exactly right.

Unless you need to vary the current, easiest to just use a suitable power resistor,
and perhaps a switch mode transistor to shut it off automatically at a chosen battery voltage.

Terminating the charging cycle on a nicad "properly" is tricky, involves measuring a rise in temperature.
But a timed charge at low current rates works well enough on nicads, as they can then handle the extra heat.
For lead-acid and lithium-ion, we can just stop when we reach a target voltage, best if we slowly taper off
the charging current as we get close to that target voltage.
Should also limit currents at the start of charging for a seriously discharged battery.

> The Army airfield battery techs also said that the way to avoid a nicad developing a memory was to not fully charge them.

Sounds like they were dealing with "Voltage depression due to long term overcharging", not "True memory effect":
That could have been due to using a timed constant current charging algorithm instead of something more elaborate.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_effect

About the only real world case of "true memory effect" on nicads that I am aware of was 
with satellites on orbit, with precisely periodic times spent in sunlight and then earth's shadow,
and constant power requirements.

Jerry, KE7ER


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Alan
 

Thanks, great info gentlemen.   When I received my V6, I got no audio or power out using the microphone on SSB and was quite concerned.   I took the advice of several of you and did the BFO adjustment and only after doing that, did SSB give me  power out.   So it may arrive Precalibrated, but mine did not work properly until I calibrated it.      thanks again gents.

Alan   K7KS


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

R. Tyson
 

I got a version 5 late last year. Put it into a case of my own choosing. Fired it up, checked it out and went on to make QSO's with it. Never did need to alter the tuning - it just worked as was. Added a CW filter and it is a great rig.

Why complicate it if you don't need to ? Use it and admire it.

Reg                   G4NFR


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

I remember Aztec C. Byte Magazine always used to benchmark C compilers and one of the tests was The Sieve of Eratosthenes. There were about a dozen C compilers in the tests, including mine, and while Aztec was so-so on most tests, it beat everyone on the Sieve test. It was later found out that they wrote a section in their compiler that could recognize the test code and, instead of compiling it, dumped out hand-tweaked assembler code for it. They pretty much died after that was discovered. I think they are also the only company that used -1 for NULL.

After that, there were a bunch of benchmark tests that use the Drystone and Whetstone benchmark tests. The problem with both of those tests is that they really didn't test the code generation of the compiler, but rather the implementation of the Standard C library function calls used in the tests. As a result, I wrote the Dhamstone (get it?) benchmark test ("Philosophy and Methodology of Benchmarks", Computer Language, Feb., 1986) as a better benchmark for testing code generation. Running that benchmark serious scrambled the test results!

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 1:04:33 PM EDT, Tom Frobase <tfrobase@...> wrote:


Jack,

 had your book on my shelf next to "K&R" and "Learning to Program in C".    We were using Astec "C"in those days with a $500 removable 10 Meg hard drive.  My staff always told me my favorite programming language was solder! ha ha ... tom, N3LLL

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 9:39 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I don't think any author thinks he can reach every potential reader successfully. But to say you've never read a single book that helped you seems unlikely. Indeed, to me it says that they aren't doing any combing of the book reviews before they buy, or they have unrealistic goals about reading a book. Also, I know that students who read the book and do the exercises will learn more than those who don't. For those, like yourself, who have a reading disability, perhaps they would be better served with a video or some other medium. Jeff makes it seem like he keeps buying books even though his mind is made up that they don't work for him. That seems like the repeat-the-same-experiment-and-expect-different-results problem. Simple solution for Jeff: Quit buying books.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 10:22:16 AM EDT, Christopher Miller <djmalak2k6@...> wrote:


I think Jeff makes a good point. I personally have a reading disability. Writing a book for everyone is impossible.

Chris 

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Jack, W8TEE


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Jack, W8TEE


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Tom Frobase
 

Jack,

 had your book on my shelf next to "K&R" and "Learning to Program in C".    We were using Astec "C"in those days with a $500 removable 10 Meg hard drive.  My staff always told me my favorite programming language was solder! ha ha ... tom, N3LLL

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 9:39 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I don't think any author thinks he can reach every potential reader successfully. But to say you've never read a single book that helped you seems unlikely. Indeed, to me it says that they aren't doing any combing of the book reviews before they buy, or they have unrealistic goals about reading a book. Also, I know that students who read the book and do the exercises will learn more than those who don't. For those, like yourself, who have a reading disability, perhaps they would be better served with a video or some other medium. Jeff makes it seem like he keeps buying books even though his mind is made up that they don't work for him. That seems like the repeat-the-same-experiment-and-expect-different-results problem. Simple solution for Jeff: Quit buying books.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 10:22:16 AM EDT, Christopher Miller <djmalak2k6@...> wrote:


I think Jeff makes a good point. I personally have a reading disability. Writing a book for everyone is impossible.

Chris 

--
Jack, W8TEE