Date   
Re: Need to Calibrate the V6 #v6

Morris Ford <morrishford@...>
 

I am trying to use the BFO tuning aid. What exactly does the part of the website mean that says to tune until the noise is centered between the two red lines? I have noise all the way across with a dip partway across. I would assume that the dip is to be centered between the two lines but tuning does not move that 'notch'. Tuning changes the relative height of the noise on the right and the left. Does someone have a screen grab?

After I wrote the above I started up the radio again and went to the web page again and twiddled the knob some more and I just snapped an image. What does that image indicate?

Morris
K7LSV



On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 2:27 PM <k7ome@...> wrote:
Thanks Reed!  I did add that issue on Github as you suggested.  I'll get this figure out some day ....

Re: ubitx #v6 Screen Speed Mod #v6

Gary Anderson
 

Thanks Jack and Reed.
When I created the global buffers in my test code:
char b[30] = {'\0'};
char c[30] = {'\0'};
The function is only called with initialized buffers from what I saw in a quick look at the V6 code.
Rgds,
Gary

Re: ubitx #v6 Screen Speed Mod #v6

Reed N
 

I agree with Jack. Memset is an important part of that implementation.

b and c are global reusable char array buffers in the code.


Reed

Re: one_stop_setting debugging #v6

 

Hi Reed,

Okay, I'm using it now and all seems to be good and stable, I will continue to use it today and report back later if I run into any problems.

Joel
N6ALT

Re: #ubitx V6 #ubitx

MVS Sarma
 

The item is traceable on ebay.ca also. I saw just now.

Re: #ubitx V6 #ubitx

MVS Sarma
 

Please see item number 291604842607  on ebay.com.
Around 18 months back i bought 10 lot  at 7.5$

Re: ubitx #v6 Screen Speed Mod #v6

Jack, W8TEE
 

Well, you may not see any reason to have it, but I do. Local buffer space is allocated on the stack, which means it contains garbage when the buffer space is created. The strcat() functions work by locating the first NULL character in the string space and appending after that. Given that the buffer can contain almost anything when created, the first NULL could be 50 bytes away from buff[0], which means that you probably just clobbered whatever was "behind" buff on the stack, which could well be the stack pointer. If that happens, your program wanders into Never-Never Land and who knows what happens next. You can leave the memset() call out of the code, but chances are 1 in 256 it won't work properly.

Also, in the code below, where is variable b defined?

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, January 17, 2020, 9:59:20 AM EST, Gary Anderson <gary.ag5tx@...> wrote:


I see no reason to do the memset in this function.  Removed it.  Less program space used and less processing cycles.
Added a rounding option, that is commented out.  More program space and processing cycles :)
Wrote a simple sketch that ran through a list of frequencies and then printed buff to STDOUT.
I will get a GitHub account so I can play better in the future.

void formatFreq(long f, char *buff) {
  // tks Jack Purdum W8TEE
  // replaced fsprint commmands by str commands for code size reduction
  // AG5TX
  // resolved issue with format below 1 MHz, there is an issue below 100 Hz
 
  // rounding uses more bytes of program storage space and adds processing cycles
  // uncomment if you want this feature
 
  // round up for when only 2 digits after decimal point are used
  /*
  if(f%10 >= 5) {
    f += 5;
  }
  */
 
  ultoa(f, b, DEC);
  int g = strlen(b);
 
  for (int i = g; i < 8 ; i++){
     strcat(buff, " ");
  }
 
  strncat(buff, b, g-3);
  strcat(buff, ".");
  strncat(buff, &b[g-3], 2); // could set last arg to 3 for 3 digits after dec point, just don't round up.
}

--
Jack, W8TEE

Re: ubitx #v6 Screen Speed Mod #v6

Gary Anderson
 

I see no reason to do the memset in this function.  Removed it.  Less program space used and less processing cycles.
Added a rounding option, that is commented out.  More program space and processing cycles :)
Wrote a simple sketch that ran through a list of frequencies and then printed buff to STDOUT.
I will get a GitHub account so I can play better in the future.

void formatFreq(long f, char *buff) {
  // tks Jack Purdum W8TEE
  // replaced fsprint commmands by str commands for code size reduction
  // AG5TX
  // resolved issue with format below 1 MHz, there is an issue below 100 Hz
 
  // rounding uses more bytes of program storage space and adds processing cycles
  // uncomment if you want this feature
 
  // round up for when only 2 digits after decimal point are used
  /*
  if(f%10 >= 5) {
    f += 5;
  }
  */
 
  ultoa(f, b, DEC);
  int g = strlen(b);
 
  for (int i = g; i < 8 ; i++){
     strcat(buff, " ");
  }
 
  strncat(buff, b, g-3);
  strcat(buff, ".");
  strncat(buff, &b[g-3], 2); // could set last arg to 3 for 3 digits after dec point, just don't round up.
}

Re: one_stop_setting debugging #v6

Reed N
 

Hey Joel,

I got enough parts that I could finally got back to this. I believe I found the source of the weirdness you saw. The issue was primarily three-fold:
  1. Per https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/74892, the screen was rendering bad stuff when below 1MHz (1000kHz)
  2. In my code, if you set the radio to a frequency outside of the bands Ashhar had coded (3.5MHz-35MHz), it would load 0, not a safe default as I had intended. If you tuned into an AM station (1000kHz, for instance) and then turned the radio off, this would fall out of the hard coded range, triggering the bug.
  3. I wasn't loading the saved oscillator cal properly at boot, so you'd need to recal the oscillator every time (not ideal!)
When combined, these result in the display doing wonky frequency things while the VFO is WAY off from where you'd want it (0Hz isn't a popular ham band, and especially not so when uncalibrated :P).

I think I have all of that stuff sorted now, so if you're willing to give the one_stop_settings branch another go to sanity check me before I merge it into my own master, I'd appreciate it. Of course, anybody else on this thread is also welcome to give it a go :)


Reed

Re: BFO update

Curt
 

well a few things to check.  since SSB is working, you must have the 4.7k resistor installed, otherwise PTT would not work. 

of course check your wiring to the key jack.  a short circuit across the interface, when you find it on the board, should get you transmitting on CW. 

when this key interface is closed, the raduino should switch the rig into CW - you should see this on the display somehow.  note that in the settings (I am not familiar with CEC) there should be a setting that configures either manual key or paddle - see which yours is set for. 

also, paddle mode does require some additional resistors to provide different pull-up voltages for dit and dah - this info is on the web somewhere.

73 Curt

Re: uBitx microphone wire up

howard winwood G4GPF
 

I can answer you, the mike has 2 connections, the ptt switch has 2 connections, for the mic one of the connections on the base goes to the metal body of the mic and should be connected to ground/earth/0 volts.
one side of the ptt switch goes to the ptt pin the other side goes to earth/ground etc so two wires go to one connection the earth/ground connection.
that’s why you only need 3 wires total for mic and ptt.
I don’t think I can add any more to that, that would explain it any better.
I think you are trying to overthink the problem, the wiring diagram shows only 3 wires from the main board, one of them earth/ground, that one MUST be the common element .

Howard G4GPF

Re: Look at this on eBay, ubitx, budget test equipment.

Tom, wb6b
 

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 09:08 AM, Jonas Sanamon wrote:
Hermes Lite 2 project
Totally amazing the things hams are doing nowadays. 

This video linked from the site is a good explanation of the radio transcever.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlgq52IIUo8

The idea of implementing the ethernet stack in state machines (in a FPGA) rather than a CPU is pretty amazing. The person who did that must enjoy challenges to the point of pain.

Tom, wb6b

Re: BFO update

John Schlosser
 

After trying various software versions on my ver 5 uBitx, the KD8CEC v1.20 brought my uBitx to life, SSB works great had good reports on 20 m, all signals sound good on other bands, and the memory manager software works, here's the but, cw transmit does nothing ( it did transmit with other software ), Any ideas where I should start looking?
Thanks,
John W5GFI

Re: #ubitx V6 #ubitx

Wayne Leake
 

 I bought a batch of 10k audio pots a while ago. The one that came with the first BITX40 broke the shaft when the case I stuffed it in got slightly dropped.
 Can still turn it with the remaining shaft, but knob won't grip, even if I trim the end.
 Rather flimsy plastic shafts.
 The ones I bought online have metal shaft. Look the same as the ones suggested. Just needs a bit more patience soldering leads.
 Those plastic shafts need to be trimmed so the knob is as close as possible to the case.

Wayne WA2YNE

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:06 PM Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
While waiting for delivery of a physically appropriate pot for a uBitx-v6
(whatever that is, I defer to those with a v6), just about any pot within 50% of 10k
(or perhaps worse, try it!) will work fine as a volume control.
Run 3 wires up from the board through a crack in the case, have it dangle out the front somehow.
No point in sitting on your hands for a month.

I'd guess 10k is more common than any other value you are likely to find in a pot salvaged from old gear.
Something claiming to be "audio taper" or "logarithmic" is preferred,
a "linear" pot will work fine but will seem very sensitive on the low end of the range.

Jerry, KE7ER



On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 08:49 AM, Jack, W8TEE wrote:
Note the delivery date...it's probably coming from China. These people are great and have quick service!
 
 
 
 

Re: BitX40 with Case Unassembled For Sale

Jim WB2LHP in MI
 

SOLD!

Re: #ubitx V6 #ubitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

While waiting for delivery of a physically appropriate pot for a uBitx-v6
(whatever that is, I defer to those with a v6), just about any pot within 50% of 10k
(or perhaps worse, try it!) will work fine as a volume control.
Run 3 wires up from the board through a crack in the case, have it dangle out the front somehow.
No point in sitting on your hands for a month.

I'd guess 10k is more common than any other value you are likely to find in a pot salvaged from old gear.
Something claiming to be "audio taper" or "logarithmic" is preferred,
a "linear" pot will work fine but will seem very sensitive on the low end of the range.

Jerry, KE7ER



On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 08:49 AM, Jack, W8TEE wrote:
Note the delivery date...it's probably coming from China. These people are great and have quick service!
 
 

Re: Look at this on eBay, ubitx, budget test equipment.

Jonas Sanamon
 

Hi Folks,

For #3,4 & 5 below I think the Hermes Lite 2 project is good bang for the buck ($225). And You get an excellent little SDR Transceiver as well.  Open Source SW and HW.
For the latest group buy the fab "Makerfabs" produced quite a few extra units and they still have some in stock, https://www.makerfabs.com/hermes-lite-2.html
Get them while they last.

I have commercial interests in the project :-)

For #3 you also need a directional coupler, build your own or get one cheap on ebay/ali express
For #5 you also need a way to vary the signal level beyond the 7 dB range the power level can be adjusted on the HL2 itself. Build Your own T or Pi attenuators or get some cheap on ebay/ali express.   Or better yet get a variable attenuator (more expensive)

Best Regards,
Jonas - SM4VEY

Den mån 13 maj 2019 kl 05:38 skrev Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...>:

Kelly, I would suggest this as a pattern of equipment purchases:

1: a good DVM.  There are good ones which won't break your wallet - and you would want as good as you can find.  I've seen them with all sorts of abilities, such as a (rather low bandwidth) frequency counter, transistor tester, and cap meter.  I've heard some horror stories about Chinese products, but I've used some of their stuff and have had no problems with it.  I use a fancy Radio Shack meter which has been adequate, accurate, and precise enough - and rugged.

(Equally important to a good meter - a good soldering iron.)

2: Look for a used scope, minimum 30mhz bandwidth.  Unless you have a lot of experience with them, stick to a used (but working) analog scope.  I've seen some pretty good deals at hamfests... working condition, for under $100.  The more you know, the more useful it can be!

3: Somewhere near the top, antenna testing gear is a necessity.  If you have soldering experience, I would suggest "rolling your own".  I could point out some inexpensive pieces that can be combined together as a very effective tool.  The Handbook has some good stuff in it, the Experimental Methods in RF design book is much better.  (I combine ideas from that with arduino, and have some really useful circuits, like a wide bandwidth and very sensitive dBm meter that reports signal strength to software or spreadsheet - more than a thousand times a second.)

4: Something that receives across the bands - a general coverage receiver of some sort is (IMO) almost a necessity on a decent bench - something with at least moderate shielding and can receive WWV and so on.  Along these lines, if you work with VHF or UHF, a decent SDR dongle is cheap and can be used for all sorts of things - like checking the deviation (and spurs) on a 2m rig.  I paid less than $30 for mine (NESDR Smart)... and there are some which are better and that can go down well into the HF range (mine stops around 27mhz). 

THEN I would recommend a signal generator.  (It could be combined with #3 to do some impressive work.)  I built my own unit by combining a DDS kit with a good attenuator salvaged from a burned signal generator.  You combine them together in a single case, and shield and ground everything, you can keep leakage to a minimum and have something really useful.  For instance... have a impedance bridge with an unknown ferrite toroid on one leg (with a single loop of wire through it)... drive the thing with the signal generator (programmed, using a computer to step it through a frequency range), and watch the output with the digitizing dBm meter.  Presto - you can with a little reading and math, figure out the characteristics of the toroid!  (Especially if you have a couple of known-value caps you can throw in the circuit...)

With those, you can get really creative.

Bob

N4FBZ

_._,_._,_

BitX40 with Case Unassembled For Sale

Jim WB2LHP in MI
 

Greetings. I still have the one BitX40 radio with case for sale...Includes working and tested board set with Allard's firmware update and brand new unassembled case kit from INKITS. Complete with all parts, cables and controls as received...$100 shipped. CONUS only. PayPal only please. Thanks for looking. Jim WB2LHP

Re: #ubitx V6 #ubitx

Jack, W8TEE
 

On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 11:24:08 AM EST, <k7ome@...> wrote:



--
Jack, W8TEE

Re: #ubitx V6 #ubitx

k7ome@...