Date   

Homebrew is alive and well in Vienna Virginia #homebrew

Dean Souleles
 

Hi all -

Some exciting news to share...

20 members of the Vienna Wireless Society Maker's Group are building a 100% scratch-built SSB transceiver based on N6QW, Pete Juliano's SimpleSSB, which I completed last year.  Not a bitX, but a close relative.  Pete's design using only 10 transistors combined with an Arduino/SI5351 controller.  I've extended to include CAT control, a Nextion touch screen, and made it a dual bander for 20 and and 40.  Since completing the rig last year I've worked stations on phone and digital all over the world.  This is a fun project for anyone wanting to build a transceiver from scratch.

I started the group build about six weeks ago and the first of our maker's got the receiver chain working just this week.  Read all about it and see videos and pictures of the in-progress build on my blog 

https://kk4das.blogspot.com/2021/04/homebrew-lives-furlough-40-simplessb.html

73,
Dean
KK4DAS


Re: uBitx Workshop

Jack, W8TEE
 

Dean:

Pete's a genius and has a wonderful way of "stage building" things. This is Al's and my SDT on a breadboard:

Inline image

We're using a breadboard platform that Al created with his 3D printer. Some will recognize Hans rcvr in the upper-right and the JackAl (red) PCB on the left side. That's a 5" touch screen and a pitiful 1.25" speaker. We're not using the touch screen for reasons I've mentioned here before, hence all the push button switches.

Al's breadboard allows us to screw the components to the surface. He has also fashioned brackets for connectors (e.g., antenna, power, keyer, etc.). Since Al and I live about a mile from each other, the breadboard makes it easy for me to carry the SDT over to Al for testing. (Al has more and better test equipment than I do, plus the advantage of knowing what he's doing with it.)

Jack, W8TEE


On Thursday, April 15, 2021, 10:25:09 PM EDT, Dean Souleles <dsouleles@...> wrote:


I prefer al-fresco Manhattan construction...... presenting the Furlough 2040 - based on Pete Juliano's Simple SSB...  not so elegant looking - but a thing of beauty for me!  

I'm working with a Maker group of 20 guys now all building this scratch-built rig - not a printed board in sight!  Tough to toss in a backpack though!





73,
Dean 
KK4DAS

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: uBitx Workshop

 

Dave,

Something like this will work on PCB wih drill set to shallow depth. I use a 1Hp motor stand drill.

https://www.amazon.in/Generic-Diamond-Marble-Ceramic-Drilling/dp/B075LKSWWG

Raj


At 16/04/2021, you wrote:
Ash,
Thanks for the construction tips.

What kind of saw do you use cut squares. A table saw set very low?  Maybe an angle grinder?

--
73
Dave
ADOB
Raduino bracket and Ham_Made_Keys


Re: uBitx Workshop

_Dave_ AD0B
 

Ash,
Thanks for the construction tips. 

What kind of saw do you use cut squares. A table saw set very low?  Maybe an angle grinder?

--
73
Dave
ADOB
Raduino bracket and Ham_Made_Keys


Re: Waiting with Bated Breath

Vic WA4THR
 

Ken, I confess I have been quite new with the RPi series and had not heard of the 3A+, but it looks interesting, although 3X the price. In my case, my son gave me a Pi-zero "kit" to play with and I decided to see if I could make a cheap, lightweight and compact system to fit in the bag with my portable station. It actually works remarkably well making some allowances for processing power, and I've had many nice contacts that way. I will be demonstrating it at a local Maker Faire this weekend.

=Vic=


Re: uBitx Workshop

Clark Martin
 



Clark Martin

KK6ISP

Yet another designated driver on the information super highway.


On Apr 15, 2021, at 9:23 PM, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:

In my High School electronics one of first projects was a one or two tube AM radio. The most fun part of the class was being there as students finally powered their weeks of works up, and just waiting for the various clouds of smoke --- and the best --- exploding electrolyte capacitors. 

In the same lab I previously mentioned, there was another project, a basic power supply, transformer, bridge rectifiers and a cap. Friend of mine built one and plugged it in and... bang, poof... electrolytic cap was bubbling. He yanked the plug but it kept bubbling.  I looked it over and un-plugged the power supply.  My friend had unplugged his soldering iron. 

The first students seem rather cavalier in powering up their radios. The following groups of students showed greater degrees of trepidation as they powered up theirs. Many, started checking out the available Simpson 260 VOMs from the tool cabinet and going over everything one more time before the power test. 

The prized construction tool of the day were Greenly chassis punches. You were an elite power builder if you had a set of those. 

Tom, wb6b


Re: uBitx Workshop

Tom, wb6b
 

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 01:21 PM, Clark Martin wrote:
One was a simple metal chassis with three tube sockets mounted with various wires connecting pins (totally non-functional circuit) and all the wire nicely laced.
In my High School electronics one of first projects was a one or two tube AM radio. The most fun part of the class was being there as students finally powered their weeks of works up, and just waiting for the various clouds of smoke --- and the best --- exploding electrolyte capacitors. 

The first students seem rather cavalier in powering up their radios. The following groups of students showed greater degrees of trepidation as they powered up theirs. Many, started checking out the available Simpson 260 VOMs from the tool cabinet and going over everything one more time before the power test. 

The prized construction tool of the day were Greenly chassis punches. You were an elite power builder if you had a set of those. 

Tom, wb6b


Re: uBitx Workshop

Ken Hansen
 

The goal is not 'just' an operational radio, it is also about demonstrating the design and build processes (as I read it). From their website homepage:

Educational Value Added

This is meant to be an advanced Soldering project that those truly dedicated to soldering can assemble. It is meant to be practice in RF PCB design and Analog RF electronics. The project will also give local amateur operators access to a low cost rig while also learning soldering.


I don't think handing someone HF Signal's no-solder 'kit' would accomplish the same goal.

The end product, a "low cost rig," is almost incidental to exercise of practicing "RF PCB design and RF electronics."

As I see it, they took Ashhar's schematic, and collectively turned it into a well laid-out PC board, populated and soldered it, and then tuned and calibrated it.

I think it looks like a great class, and if it costs a bit more, it is well worth it, in my opinion.

Ken, N2VIP

On Apr 14, 2021, at 06:26, Dennis Zabawa <kg4rul@...> wrote:

It seems their BOM totals $190USD.  You can buy a basic kit w/ acrylic front/rear panels and mike, shipped via DHL, for $160USD.  I guess there is a price for education!


Re: uBitx Workshop

Dean Souleles
 

I prefer al-fresco Manhattan construction...... presenting the Furlough 2040 - based on Pete Juliano's Simple SSB...  not so elegant looking - but a thing of beauty for me!  

I'm working with a Maker group of 20 guys now all building this scratch-built rig - not a printed board in sight!  Tough to toss in a backpack though!





73,
Dean 
KK4DAS


Re: UBITX is in hand!

Curt
 

Jerry

Wow half hour, those of us who did previous versions may be groaning. 

Yes there is no button for fast tuning, hence this feature. You might miss it when its gone, or you may wish to slow it down. 

You may need nearly 3 amps to go into transmit. 

Mod it as you please. 

Curt


UBITX is in hand!

jerry@tr2.com
 

The doorbell just rang. It was a DHL courier with the UBITX. I just put it together. Calling it a "kit" is IMHO a little overblown. It was all of a half hour effort to bolt everything together. The only issues I had were
1. Tape residue on the top panel. WD-40?
2. The volume control shaft is *barely* long enough to get the knob on it.
I might want to chuck the knob on my lathe and turn it down a bit so it
can get a better bite without scraping the front panel.

In a hurry to try it out, I hooked it up to an old 3-terminal-regulator power supply with clip leads. I gotta say, it's a lot of radio for $200.
It passes the WWV test for frequency accuracy - tune 10Mhz and verify that USB sounds the same as LSB... I found the auto-fast-tuning a little disconcerting - whip the knob to get up to THERE, and all of a sudden it's in fast mode and way past. I might want to modify the firmware to change that.

- Jerry KF6VB


Re: Linear Amplifier Build

Vince Vielhaber
 

Yes.

(3) Exhibit no amplification (0 dB gain) between 26 MHz and 28 MHz.

Vince - K8ZW.

On 04/15/2021 02:02 PM, jerry@tr2.com wrote:
There used to be a rule that commercial linears could not work on
10M - companies would make them topping out at 15M, and offer a kit
to get 10M to licensed amateurs. Is that still in place?

- Jerry KF6VB



On 2021-04-15 10:58, Vince Vielhaber wrote:
Further, it refers to the input of the amp to the output of the amp,
not the internal stage(s). Many LDMOS amps I've seen have an
attenuator on the input port inside the amp. The 15db factor comes
before this attenuator unless the attenuator is mounted on the
outside.

Vince - K8ZW.

On 04/15/2021 01:57 AM, Dale Frye wrote:
There is a restriction in Part 97 section 97.317 that does place a
limitation of 15db gain on an external RF amplifier to receive FCC
certification. However certification is only needed for an external ham
RF amplifier constructed by someone without a ham license. (97.315)

So yes, there is a 15db limit but it does not apply to an external RF
amplifier used on the ham bands constructed by someone with an amateur
radio license.
--
K8ZW http://www.metalworkingfun.com http://www.hamradio.fun





Re: uBitx Workshop

Jack, W8TEE
 

Didn't say it would work for RF, only that it looked cool. Given all of the LEDs in the photo, it's probably not doing anything at RF. Al and I have fabricated PCB's using the same ground plane/etched pads technique and it works well and is quick, albeit not very pretty. Construction methods are influenced by what you're trying to do.

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, April 15, 2021, 4:26:13 PM EDT, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:


The trouble with neat looking circuits is that they are invariably trouble at RF.
In Manhattan construction, the pads for inadvertent capacitors of really poor quality that degrade the rf performance if filters,  leak away rf to the ground.
By bending component leads sharply, you create small inductances that could even couple with each other.
This is why, the ugly works so well. There are very miniscule capaictances, the leads are straight and point to point, and there is a good, large ground that works without a hitch.
I have used a method if scoring squares on one side of a double sided copper clad board. To makena ground connection I drill a hole and solder the sqaure to the ground plane bottom layer. It works, sorta.the filters are shallower, but I can work with SMD without needing to print a board.

On Thu 15 Apr, 2021, 8:44 PM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io, <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Actually, I find that pretty cool!!

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, April 15, 2021, 10:55:46 AM EDT, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:


On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 08:33 AM, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
Squaring off all the wires like that was typical of radios built 100 years ago:
Maybe we should stare constructing like this. (below)

Also can't wait to see the papers the students in the workshop produced. Like papers of page after page of pure calculus describing the uBitx in the longest possible of equations.

Although, in reality, it might be fun to see some of the breakdowns of the design. 

-------

---------
https://www.bhoite.com/sculptures/555-bcd-demux/

Tom, wb6b



--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: uBitx Workshop

Ashhar Farhan
 

The trouble with neat looking circuits is that they are invariably trouble at RF.
In Manhattan construction, the pads for inadvertent capacitors of really poor quality that degrade the rf performance if filters,  leak away rf to the ground.
By bending component leads sharply, you create small inductances that could even couple with each other.
This is why, the ugly works so well. There are very miniscule capaictances, the leads are straight and point to point, and there is a good, large ground that works without a hitch.
I have used a method if scoring squares on one side of a double sided copper clad board. To makena ground connection I drill a hole and solder the sqaure to the ground plane bottom layer. It works, sorta.the filters are shallower, but I can work with SMD without needing to print a board.

On Thu 15 Apr, 2021, 8:44 PM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io, <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Actually, I find that pretty cool!!

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, April 15, 2021, 10:55:46 AM EDT, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:


On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 08:33 AM, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
Squaring off all the wires like that was typical of radios built 100 years ago:
Maybe we should stare constructing like this. (below)

Also can't wait to see the papers the students in the workshop produced. Like papers of page after page of pure calculus describing the uBitx in the longest possible of equations.

Although, in reality, it might be fun to see some of the breakdowns of the design. 

-------

---------
https://www.bhoite.com/sculptures/555-bcd-demux/

Tom, wb6b



--
Jack, W8TEE


uBitx v6 kit to amateur radio kits.in case upgrade

Sal DeFranco
 

I purchased the uBitx v6 kit and want to upgrade the case and display to

the amateurradiokits.in Universal Case Black For uBitx Nextion Display Fitting 5 Inch

I have looked over the case and the pics all show the uBitx v5 board...

Has anyone done this upgrade and if so any links to the instruction for the upgrade.

Thank You

-- 
Sal P. De Franco
N6SPD

There are three kinds of people in this world:
Those who make things happen...
Those who watch things happen...
and Those who don't know what the !@#$ is happening!!!

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Linear Amplifier Build

jerry@tr2.com
 

There used to be a rule that commercial linears could not work on
10M - companies would make them topping out at 15M, and offer a kit
to get 10M to licensed amateurs. Is that still in place?

- Jerry KF6VB

On 2021-04-15 10:58, Vince Vielhaber wrote:
Further, it refers to the input of the amp to the output of the amp,
not the internal stage(s). Many LDMOS amps I've seen have an
attenuator on the input port inside the amp. The 15db factor comes
before this attenuator unless the attenuator is mounted on the
outside.
Vince - K8ZW.
On 04/15/2021 01:57 AM, Dale Frye wrote:
There is a restriction in Part 97 section 97.317 that does place a
limitation of 15db gain on an external RF amplifier to receive FCC
certification. However certification is only needed for an external ham
RF amplifier constructed by someone without a ham license. (97.315)
So yes, there is a 15db limit but it does not apply to an external RF
amplifier used on the ham bands constructed by someone with an amateur
radio license.
--
K8ZW http://www.metalworkingfun.com http://www.hamradio.fun


Re: Linear Amplifier Build

Vince Vielhaber
 

Further, it refers to the input of the amp to the output of the amp, not the internal stage(s). Many LDMOS amps I've seen have an attenuator on the input port inside the amp. The 15db factor comes before this attenuator unless the attenuator is mounted on the outside.

Vince - K8ZW.

On 04/15/2021 01:57 AM, Dale Frye wrote:
There is a restriction in Part 97 section 97.317 that does place a
limitation of 15db gain on an external RF amplifier to receive FCC
certification. However certification is only needed for an external ham
RF amplifier constructed by someone without a ham license. (97.315)

So yes, there is a 15db limit but it does not apply to an external RF
amplifier used on the ham bands constructed by someone with an amateur
radio license.


More from MPJA

Bob Lunsford
 


Re: Waiting with Bated Breath

Ken Hansen
 

Vic,

Don't forget the "in-between" Raspberry Pi that sits between the tiny Pi Zero and the full-size Pi 3 and 4 - the Model 3A+ RPi. It has a quad-core processor but lacks the RJ-45 and several of the USB ports on a 'regular' RPi.


It is twice the size of a Pi Zero, but provides more processing 'umph' than the Pi Zero.

Ken, N2VIP 

On Apr 13, 2021, at 04:27, Vic WA4THR via groups.io <vhklein@...> wrote:

I have been doing the remote control thing for digital modes lately using a little Raspberry Pi-zero W which has built in WiFi. The intention was to act as a local hotspot when out in the boonies so I can use an inexpensive tablet to control it, but I have even left it connected at home and linked to it while waiting for a car repair many miles away and made contacts on FT8 and PSK31. The Pi-zero is a bit limited in processing capability, but cheap and the size of a stick of gum, so it was good for the lightweight portable application I intended. If size and weight (and cost) are not factors, better results could probably be had with one of the bigger brothers like the Pi-4.

=Vic=


Re: uBitx Workshop

Jack, W8TEE
 

Actually, I find that pretty cool!!

Jack, W8TEE

On Thursday, April 15, 2021, 10:55:46 AM EDT, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:


On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 08:33 AM, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
Squaring off all the wires like that was typical of radios built 100 years ago:
Maybe we should stare constructing like this. (below)

Also can't wait to see the papers the students in the workshop produced. Like papers of page after page of pure calculus describing the uBitx in the longest possible of equations.

Although, in reality, it might be fun to see some of the breakdowns of the design. 

-------

---------
https://www.bhoite.com/sculptures/555-bcd-demux/

Tom, wb6b



--
Jack, W8TEE

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