Date   

Re: uBitx v6 board failure--suggestions? #ubitxv6 #v6

Jerry Gaffke
 

John,

If it's getting your goat, perhaps set it aside for a week or two.
Maybe ask for some help at a local amateur radio club.
But I think you are close to solving this.

Sounds like you have the IRF510's set to 100ma of idle drain current each, so the IRF510's are ok.
And that when you put an RF wattmeter between TP7 and ground when transmitting in CW mode
you see nothing on that meter, even when the trace from TP7 to the first relay is cut.
So it seems you are not getting RF power into the IRF510 gates from the driver stage.

Evan is right, next step is to check static voltages on all those driver transistors with a DVM when
attempting to transmit in SSB mode with no audio.  Should see the emitter somewhat above ground
(indicating quiescient emitter current) and the base about 0.6 volts above the emitter (indicating
the transistor is biased into the active region).
Here is the file from VU2ZAP:  https://groups.io/g/BITX20/files/VU2ZAP

If the static checks look ok, I suggest you next look for an RF signal that gets progressively stronger
at TP2,3,4,5,6 and the IRF510 gates while attempting to transmit in CW mode.
You could build a diode RF probe (a 1n5711 will be easier to find than a 1n34a and sensitive enough)  
    http://www.n5ese.com/rfprobe2.htm
or you could clip 3 feet of wire to each test point as an antenna and look for it with your other receiver
(but make sure the wire is insulated so it doesn't short to something like ground or 12vdc).

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 05:07 PM, Evan Hand wrote:
There is a static voltage chart in the Files section of this site.  Look for an Excel file from VU2ZAP.  It is for a v4, but the RF amp sections are pretty much the same, so the voltages should be good.  The static voltages around Q90 are a good indication if the transistor is blown.


Re: ubitx v6.1 #ft8 #ubitx6-help #cat #wsjt-x

WB0WQS
 

I  struggled a bit with the cat connection.  Then I went into the device manager and changed the
Baud rate to 38400...com4  and also set up wsjt-x for the same.  The cat control is working now.
I made a couple of FT-8 contacts on 10 meters today with it.  73.

Kelly Ellison
-WB0WQS


james@...
 

I have a new ubitx ver 6.1 
When I try to use WSJT-X I get the error "ham lib error: IO error while getting current frequency" and the Raduino reboot
The serial port settings are correct. 
I have tried older versions of WSJT and the newest beta version,
I have tried different rig settings - FT-817 857 897 etc
I have tried everything I have found online. Also tried 2 different pc's
I am out of ideas. Perhaps the unit is defective ?
Please Help ! Any suggestion?
thanks and 73 James


Re: uBitx v6 board failure--suggestions? #ubitxv6 #v6

Evan Hand
 

John,
There is a static voltage chart in the Files section of this site.  Look for an Excel file from VU2ZAP.  It is for a v4, but the RF amp sections are pretty much the same, so the voltages should be good.  The static voltages around Q90 are a good indication if the transistor is blown.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: uBitx v6 board failure--suggestions? #ubitxv6 #v6

John Terrell
 

Thanks again Jerry. FWIW, I used to be an electronics repair tech at a factory that made large, 200 amp switchers about 40 years ago. But I'm not an RF engineer. 
I've done most of what you suggested. I looked for shorts. Couldn't find a burned component or trace. I removed, tested and re-installed T11. It's fine. I even cut the trace from T7 to pin 13 on relay KA1. That made no difference. 
 
There is output, enough to hear on my IC-7600 on another antenna (a separate magnetic receiving loop). Connecting or disconnecting the T7 - KA1 link (I cut the trace and repaired it with a short length of hookup wire) makes no difference. It's enough to pin the needle on direct wire connection to a field strength meter but not enough to get the needle to budge on two separate wattmeters. I can adjust output to the drivers using RV1, but that's it. Basically it has about as much output as my MFJ antenna analyzer. And this is with RV2 and RV3 adjusted as you instructed, raising idle current 100 mA for each MOSFET.
 
I think this unit is a great way to get people on the air with a HF rig without having to spend a lot of money. And I've learned quite a bit myself. But I'm done with this board for now.  I don't know what's wrong with it. I'd rather switch it out. How can I go about doing that?
 
John Terrell
N6LN


Re: RPi Pico

Ken Hansen
 

I picked up a RPi Pico at Microcenter today - the shipment apparently sidestepped the inventory system, their in-store item count was -23!

I paid $2 at Dallas Microcenter - it's very nice to live close to a Microcenter...

Ken, N2VIP

On Jan 21, 2021, at 15:35, Dennis Zabawa <kg4rul@...> wrote:

$10.59 on Amazon and no shipping cost  - not expected in stock till third week of February


Re: RPi Pico

otalado
 

Ashhar said: "They have released visual studio."

I am afraid, you've read the announcement too quickly. At https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-silicon-pico-now-on-sale/ they are stating: 
For power users, we provide a complete C SDK, a GCC-based toolchain, and Visual Studio Code integration. Visual Studio Code is just an editor (although it is a very good editor) and not an IDE. So don't count on Visual studio 209 just jet. And it is a lot better than the Arduino IDE. I have not checked yet if there is debugging available as I am still waiting for the RPI Pico to arrive. I was also impressed to have such an IDE available, but when I could not find anything about how to do it with VS 2019, so I re-read the announcement and realized it's VS Code and not VS. Who knows - perhaps someone will write an extension for VS in the future ...



Re: RPi Pico

Tom, wb6b
 

On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 09:19 AM, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
A good introduction to simple ADC's and DAC's can be found in chapter 3 of this
free (and excellent) book on DSP techniques.  The first link is Smith's webpage.
The second link has an option to download entire book as one file.
    http://www.dspguide.com/pdfbook.htm
    https://www.analog.com/en/education/education-library/scientist_engineers_guide.html
In the past CVSD was implemented in hardware only and achieved good practical results. 
See:


Re: RPi Pico

Jerry Gaffke
 

If you have an ADC but no DAC, you could make a DAC by driving a cap 
through a resistor from a GPIO pin and watch the voltage on that cap with the ADC. 
Firmware drives the voltage on the cap up or down till it agrees with the
digital sample that you are targeting.  An extra GPIO pin (normally tristated)
might be used if larger voltage swings between samples are needed.


A good introduction to simple ADC's and DAC's can be found in chapter 3 of this
free (and excellent) book on DSP techniques.  The first link is Smith's webpage.
The second link has an option to download entire book as one file.
    http://www.dspguide.com/pdfbook.htm
    https://www.analog.com/en/education/education-library/scientist_engineers_guide.html

You can jump right in on page 60 for the section "Single BIt Data Conversion".
It describes a delta converter, CVSD converters, and delta-sigma converters.


Arduino programs often use a counter-timer as a simple DAC.
Assuming a max count of 256 counting up at 1mhz, it sets the output to 1 at
the start of the count, clears it when the count reaches the 8 bit sample value.
The output pin of the counter-timer charges a cap through a series resistor,
giving a low pass filter that averages the voltage seen from the counter-timer.

The delta converter described by Smith is similar, it takes 256 ticks per sample
to create an ADC or DAC with 256 levels, but the output continuously flips 
up and down (for any sample values other than at the extremes of 0,1,FE,FF).
This makes the output easier to filter.  However, as the name "delta" suggests,
the output relates to the slope of the incoming waveform, not the actual value.

The CVSD converter is a delta converter that uses a special trick to increase
the possible slew rate, the rate at which the analog signal can change.
This reduces the bit rate required for a given bandwidth.

The delta-sigma converter adds tricks to a delta converter so the
digital value can represent the absolute value of the analog signal,
not just the slope.

That section of Smith's book will give you some idea  why many of the really cheap
microcontrollers have just a comparator, no ADC or DAC.

Jerry, KE7ER



On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 04:56 PM, Dr. Flywheel wrote:
PWM output in conjunction with an analog low pass filter can have very good and clean analog output, as long as the sampling frequency is significantly higher than the highest frequency component of the desired output signal. In addition, a 1-bit digital output with an analog integrator can be used to form an Adaptive Delta Modulator (CVSD) or ADPCM with high bit rate.
 
In the past CVSD was implemented in hardware only and achieved good practical results. 
See:
--Ron
N7FTZ


WARNING: Promotional material

Jack, W8TEE
 

All:

I have lowered the price of my Beginning C for Microcontrollers book on Amazon (search: B08GFDGN7P). Also, the small font size issue has been corrected and the book no longer tosses in a few blank pages for no reason. (The narrative was always all there; it just inserted blank pages.)

Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: TUNE signal for tuning tuners

Frank Krozel
 

Thanks everyone, lots to think of, I use a paddle when remote operation so looking for something simple.  Lots to digest, thanks all. Frank KG9H
(Informal uBitz net Sunday, 7.277 9:30A Central.  de KG9H


Re: FT8 and power levels

Rubens Kamimura
 

Hello everyone,

Grateful for the tips.
I changed the five relays of the uBITX v4, it improved a lot, for example it stopped oscillating the power, even with "fake it" unchecked for "split" operation. Now I need to resolve the issue of the absence of RF power in the range of 10 to 15m, I believe I will have to replace the Q90 transistor.
73
Rubens
py2pvb
--
Saudações fraternais, 
73's PY2PVB

Rubens Kamimura
Técnico em Eletrônica e Eletrotécnica - Aposentado
CFT/CRT-SP: 80254934820
Cel. +55 (18) 9-9819-2225 WhatsApp


Em sex., 22 de jan. de 2021 às 15:30, Rubens Kamimura <rubens.kamimura@...> escreveu:

Group,

Yes, uBITX has some problems, as it was developed to serve as economically as possible. That is why we are working and trying to improve. I am very grateful to the group for their help and attention. I have tried to work with a resting current of around 90mA and with injection (VR1 setting) for low power (QRP) in the range of 5 to 7 Watts (40m/FT8), to avoid RF feedback. But, there are inevitably unwanted feedbacks that we have to rework. Use JTDX with "fake it" selected.
73
Rubens
py2pvb


Em sex., 22 de jan. de 2021 às 10:55, Mitchel Rought <mitchelrought@...> escreveu:
As the originator of this thread I would like to thank everyone who joined in, I knew when I bought my uBITX V6 it was low power and planned on that
Since August I have made almost 500 contacts using FT8 which include 18 countries
Running low power means you pay a lot more attention to antenna construction, cable runs and definitely paying attention to band conditions and timing
Will be looking at slightly more power in the future but right now 5-7 watts is still fun


Re: RPi Pico

Tom, wb6b
 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 12:20 PM, bobolink wrote:
You guys can save me a lot of time by giving me a way to control amplitude and frequency using a microcontroller's PWM (other than sin x/x amplitude) and no external parts (as always, we are designing to cost).
This code is sort of a one stop shopping center for many digital processing techniques for analog signals. He uses PWM for his analog outputs. 
https://github.com/threeme3/QCX-SSB

Tom, wb6b


Re: Dual Core ARM M0 memory arbitration, etc.

Jack, W8TEE
 

agree

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, January 22, 2021, 9:11:29 PM EST, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:


On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 11:45 AM, Jack, W8TEE wrote:
If there is an "src" directory, that's true. Many libraries, however, do not use an arc directory.
 
It seems like the build system has been designed to makes assumptions based on the name and layout of the directories. As I try this attempt to pack my project and the libraries I want to lock down to a particular version, by bundling them all together in one package, I'll let you know how well it worked. I tried naming the "src" directory to "lib" (as that would be a more logical name for the location of project local libraries) for instance, and the build would fail at the liking stage.

Also in the LiquidCrystal directory tree example, the whole library is copied (and the version preserved) to the X_LiquidCrystal directory, not just the ".h" file. I left that part out in my earlier post.

The Arduino IDE does a lot of things in creating a build automatically. Most of the time that is great. Why it is so much more easy to work with. Sometimes it means scratching your head over what assumptions it makes. Most times, is way more pleasant then the good old days of hand constructing "Make" files. 

For core libraries, maintained by the core Arduino IDE developers, I would not copy them into project local libraries. But the ones that seem to have conflicting versions, I would.

Tom, wb6b

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Dual Core ARM M0 memory arbitration, etc.

Tom, wb6b
 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 11:45 AM, Jack, W8TEE wrote:
If there is an "src" directory, that's true. Many libraries, however, do not use an arc directory.
 
It seems like the build system has been designed to makes assumptions based on the name and layout of the directories. As I try this attempt to pack my project and the libraries I want to lock down to a particular version, by bundling them all together in one package, I'll let you know how well it worked. I tried naming the "src" directory to "lib" (as that would be a more logical name for the location of project local libraries) for instance, and the build would fail at the liking stage.

Also in the LiquidCrystal directory tree example, the whole library is copied (and the version preserved) to the X_LiquidCrystal directory, not just the ".h" file. I left that part out in my earlier post.

The Arduino IDE does a lot of things in creating a build automatically. Most of the time that is great. Why it is so much more easy to work with. Sometimes it means scratching your head over what assumptions it makes. Most times, is way more pleasant then the good old days of hand constructing "Make" files. 

For core libraries, maintained by the core Arduino IDE developers, I would not copy them into project local libraries. But the ones that seem to have conflicting versions, I would.

Tom, wb6b


Re: RPi Pico

Dr. Flywheel
 

PWM output in conjunction with an analog low pass filter can have very good and clean analog output, as long as the sampling frequency is significantly higher than the highest frequency component of the desired output signal. In addition, a 1-bit digital output with an analog integrator can be used to form an Adaptive Delta Modulator (CVSD) or ADPCM with high bit rate.

In the past CVSD was implemented in hardware only and achieved good practical results. 
See:
--Ron
N7FTZ



On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 2:29 PM Shirley Dulcey KE1L <mark@...> wrote:
I don't know whether the Raspberry PI Foundation will produce versions of the Pico or leave it to partners. Adafruit, Arduino, and SparkFun has all announced boards based on the RP2040. The Arduino one includes 16MB flash, WiFi, Bluetooth, MEMS sensors including a microphone, and a crypto chip.

On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 3:34 PM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The RPi-pico docs are amazingly good:
    https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/pico/getting-started/
Having dug around the web a couple years ago trying to figure out how to use a blue pill,
this is very refreshing.

Regarding DAC's, the "Hardware Design with RP2040" document has some curious examples.
It shows how to drive a VGA monitor with 5+5+5 bits of analog RGB using the PIO state machines
out to 15 GPIO pins (plus pins for HS and VS) and a bunch of resistors.
Should be easy to bring that down to 1+1+1 bits if you don't want to burn so many GPIO pins.
Also shows how to create moderately good audio from two GPIO pins using PWM.
Here's an article describing RPi audio, the RPi-pico doc uses the new improved RPi3 scheme: 
    https://hackaday.com/2018/07/13/behind-the-pin-how-the-raspberry-pi-gets-its-audio/

The HW Design doc also shows how to implement an SD card interface using 6 GPIO pins.

Figure 7 on p26 of the RP2040 datasheet shows that there are 32 spinlock bits 
accessible from both Core0 and Core1.  Section 2.3.1.3 on p28 describes how they work.
(I doubt making it possible to run an arbitrary program on both cores is necessary here,
for an embedded controller we can write our code to use both cores as necessary.)
The datasheet states that there are two each of UART, SPI, and I2C interfaces,
the RPi-pico breakout board pin chart suggests more but that is just alternate GPIO pin selections.
The ADC can do 500k samples/second, a mux selects one of four device pins or the internal
temperature sensor, but the breakout board only makes 3 of those 4 device pins available.

The separate Python and C SDK docs start out with simple blinky LED and Hello World 
examples, and progress from there in a logical manner.  Very readable.
MS Visual Studio is indeed front and center in the C SDK, reading the VS FAQ is
somewhat reassuring in that you can apparently shut down auto updates and phoning home.
And no, you don't need Windows10 to run it.

I suspect this is only the start.  The part numbering scheme described at the start of
the RP2040 datasheet suggests there are other processor chips in the plan.
That breakout board is not at all crowded, I can easily imagine WiFi/Bluetooth/Audio
getting added as time goes on.

Yes, there are more powerful Arm breakout boards.
There are even a few cheaper ones.
For a dollar more, the RPi-Zero offers way more resources if you want them.
But given simplicity, the documentation, and the SDK's, the Pico looks like a winner.

Jerry, KE7ER


Re: RPi Pico

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

I don't know whether the Raspberry PI Foundation will produce versions of the Pico or leave it to partners. Adafruit, Arduino, and SparkFun has all announced boards based on the RP2040. The Arduino one includes 16MB flash, WiFi, Bluetooth, MEMS sensors including a microphone, and a crypto chip.


On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 3:34 PM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The RPi-pico docs are amazingly good:
    https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/pico/getting-started/
Having dug around the web a couple years ago trying to figure out how to use a blue pill,
this is very refreshing.

Regarding DAC's, the "Hardware Design with RP2040" document has some curious examples.
It shows how to drive a VGA monitor with 5+5+5 bits of analog RGB using the PIO state machines
out to 15 GPIO pins (plus pins for HS and VS) and a bunch of resistors.
Should be easy to bring that down to 1+1+1 bits if you don't want to burn so many GPIO pins.
Also shows how to create moderately good audio from two GPIO pins using PWM.
Here's an article describing RPi audio, the RPi-pico doc uses the new improved RPi3 scheme: 
    https://hackaday.com/2018/07/13/behind-the-pin-how-the-raspberry-pi-gets-its-audio/

The HW Design doc also shows how to implement an SD card interface using 6 GPIO pins.

Figure 7 on p26 of the RP2040 datasheet shows that there are 32 spinlock bits 
accessible from both Core0 and Core1.  Section 2.3.1.3 on p28 describes how they work.
(I doubt making it possible to run an arbitrary program on both cores is necessary here,
for an embedded controller we can write our code to use both cores as necessary.)
The datasheet states that there are two each of UART, SPI, and I2C interfaces,
the RPi-pico breakout board pin chart suggests more but that is just alternate GPIO pin selections.
The ADC can do 500k samples/second, a mux selects one of four device pins or the internal
temperature sensor, but the breakout board only makes 3 of those 4 device pins available.

The separate Python and C SDK docs start out with simple blinky LED and Hello World 
examples, and progress from there in a logical manner.  Very readable.
MS Visual Studio is indeed front and center in the C SDK, reading the VS FAQ is
somewhat reassuring in that you can apparently shut down auto updates and phoning home.
And no, you don't need Windows10 to run it.

I suspect this is only the start.  The part numbering scheme described at the start of
the RP2040 datasheet suggests there are other processor chips in the plan.
That breakout board is not at all crowded, I can easily imagine WiFi/Bluetooth/Audio
getting added as time goes on.

Yes, there are more powerful Arm breakout boards.
There are even a few cheaper ones.
For a dollar more, the RPi-Zero offers way more resources if you want them.
But given simplicity, the documentation, and the SDK's, the Pico looks like a winner.

Jerry, KE7ER


Re: Hamlib error: Target VFO unaccessible #ubitxv6

Mick
 

James,
I just ran into this while replacing my computer (and reloading all software). I was able to get WSJT-x v 2.3.0 alpha to work but got the same error you have with v 2.2.2. It seems to be a WSJT error. Since this is an alpha version it will expire at the end of the month.
Hope this helps a little. V2.3.0 is unstable (as expected) but at least it works.
--
 

73
Mick VA3EPM 


Hamlib error: Target VFO unaccessible #ubitxv6

james@...
 

Ubitx v 6.1 with WSJT-X set to FT817
The serial IO parameters are correct and match the settings in the device manager CH340
The error is "Hamlib error: Target VFO unaccessible" or "IO error while getting frequency"  - the ubitx raduino reboots every time a request is made.   (TEST CAT)
I have compared my Radio settings to many articles and they are correct

I have trued all the suggestions I have found including different versions of WSFT-X and Different rigs such as FT-857 897 etc
I have also tried Ham Radio Deluxe free version - gives device error - device not functioning - check cable
Rigctl give IO error for any command 

I have no idea where to go from here
Help
thanks with gratitude
James


 


Re: RPi Pico

Jerry Gaffke
 

The RPi-pico docs are amazingly good:
    https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/pico/getting-started/
Having dug around the web a couple years ago trying to figure out how to use a blue pill,
this is very refreshing.

Regarding DAC's, the "Hardware Design with RP2040" document has some curious examples.
It shows how to drive a VGA monitor with 5+5+5 bits of analog RGB using the PIO state machines
out to 15 GPIO pins (plus pins for HS and VS) and a bunch of resistors.
Should be easy to bring that down to 1+1+1 bits if you don't want to burn so many GPIO pins.
Also shows how to create moderately good audio from two GPIO pins using PWM.
Here's an article describing RPi audio, the RPi-pico doc uses the new improved RPi3 scheme: 
    https://hackaday.com/2018/07/13/behind-the-pin-how-the-raspberry-pi-gets-its-audio/

The HW Design doc also shows how to implement an SD card interface using 6 GPIO pins.

Figure 7 on p26 of the RP2040 datasheet shows that there are 32 spinlock bits 
accessible from both Core0 and Core1.  Section 2.3.1.3 on p28 describes how they work.
(I doubt making it possible to run an arbitrary program on both cores is necessary here,
for an embedded controller we can write our code to use both cores as necessary.)
The datasheet states that there are two each of UART, SPI, and I2C interfaces,
the RPi-pico breakout board pin chart suggests more but that is just alternate GPIO pin selections.
The ADC can do 500k samples/second, a mux selects one of four device pins or the internal
temperature sensor, but the breakout board only makes 3 of those 4 device pins available.

The separate Python and C SDK docs start out with simple blinky LED and Hello World 
examples, and progress from there in a logical manner.  Very readable.
MS Visual Studio is indeed front and center in the C SDK, reading the VS FAQ is
somewhat reassuring in that you can apparently shut down auto updates and phoning home.
And no, you don't need Windows10 to run it.

I suspect this is only the start.  The part numbering scheme described at the start of
the RP2040 datasheet suggests there are other processor chips in the plan.
That breakout board is not at all crowded, I can easily imagine WiFi/Bluetooth/Audio
getting added as time goes on.

Yes, there are more powerful Arm breakout boards.
There are even a few cheaper ones.
For a dollar more, the RPi-Zero offers way more resources if you want them.
But given simplicity, the documentation, and the SDK's, the Pico looks like a winner.

Jerry, KE7ER

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