Date   

Re: Electronic encoder (Not rotary)

Gerard
 

Evan ,Bob,
Evan, I checked the earth ground  of the oscilloscope, it’s well grounded. For the power outlets, both are on the same connection.
I checked my home made power supply I built. I see actually  the radiator screwed on the chassis, the - Power is connected on it, so also on the ground of the 220V which explains the phenomenon with the oscilloscope.
I looked on the net, in fact with a power supply with a transformer, it is considered that this one makes the "galvanic" isolation. In these cases, my -Power may not need to be connected to the ground chassis, so to the ground 220v.
On your Ubitx, in theory you must use an external 12v power supply.
I thing you use this type This is called a double isolation power supply, so 2 wires for power, so no earth.
I have a cutting-out power supply from an old sattelite receiver, I’ll run a test with it to see...
see picture before power was put in the chassis.
Radiotor is connecting on -Power under the pcb with screws.
Nb: I have implanted on the power supply, a temperature sensor and the mounting that goes with it, to avoid that the fan does not run constantly. it works very well. see >>> fan Ubitx (Little CI)

for conclusion, i think an expert will said us, that to do exactly.
cdt


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Tom, wb6b
 

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 05:34 PM, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
They also have this for $3.99, if you can wait for a boat from China:
Jerry,

Thanks for pointing those out. I just ordered some for my parts supply. Looks like the price is a 50% off promo price. 
For just a little more in shipping, less Than $0.50, it can ship Banggood Express, that is supposedly faster than Air. Still 15-20 days though.

Of course, I ended up buying some other things like a $1.99 stereo audio amp board and an 8 relay board (Might be good for switching between several pre-tuned matching networks at my antenna. A cheap remote "auto" match for multi band operation on one antenna.) And a tiny OLED display module to remind me that bigger displays are easier to read. 

On the subject of the test set. Would it be possible to add some jumper plugs to break the circuits at critical points or jumper across parts of the circuits and test points to the uBitx and produce a sketch that could be loaded into the Raduino for the express purpose of alignment and troubleshooting, assuming the uBitx is mostly functional. The idea would be to allow the built-in Raduino to be a signal generator for one section of the uBitx at a time, and possibility use a simple DVM and a RF detector probe to verify passband and centering of filters and such. You may still want an accurate signal source to verify the final frequency calibration. That could just be a simple xtal oscillator. 

Tom, wb6b


V7 Suggestion

Bob Lunsford
 

I know that programming is limited to code limits but this would be a nice V7 attribute, to me anyway...

When going to Split, an option on the screen would be "A = B" or, in other words, the operating frequency could be copied to VFO "B" in case you only wanted move the second/transmit VFO only a small distance. I normally leave mine at some AM Broadcast frequency so I can go to a broadcast station almost instantaneously but this would give the option to go immediately to the VFO "A" frequency where it could be used for transmitting in VFO "B" while allowing the operator to tune in a station better, for example, while not moving the transmit frequency. I know that RIT can do the same but this would help not make the mistake of leaving the RIT engaged and also give more flexibility on receive.

When selecting Split, then, one could put the two VFO's on the same frequency and not have to dial in the same frequency of VFO "A"  which for me would be a saving of time. The code would only refer to another line where the frequency of VFO "A" is listed and would "probably" only require one line of additional code. (Don't quote me, I'm not a code writer...)

Bob — KK5R


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Bob Lunsford
 

Thanks, Raj. I'm still wondering if you press the word "plot" on the screen or if there's a button on the case that is not visible. If you press "plot" on the screen, it must be sensitive to the finger's capacitance and goes to the plotting the signal. Regardless, I'm wondering if you "measure [frequency] indirectly in power mode," is it very accurate? Considering the many decimal places shown on the screen, I'm guessing it's pretty accurate. I see it's measuring in the HF range but does it also work at 2M for measuring, for example, the SWR of an antenna?

It's a box full of capabilities and must be of value when added to the tools in one's station. I'm very interested. I no longer buy a car on the basis of a sales brochure and also want to know as much as possible when buying test equipment.

Thanks again for your very helpful feedback.

Bob — KK5R

On Monday, October 26, 2020, 1:12:05 AM EDT, Raj vu2zap <rajendrakumargg@...> wrote:


Bob,

It has SMA connectors two of them. One output and one input.

When you press plot, it plots on its own screen. No PC required. No touch screen.

No freq. counter but you can measure indirectly in power mode.

It comes fully complete in a metal box..

Raj


At 26/10/2020, you wrote:
This looks very interesting. One specification was not shown, however. In the Antuino write-up, you show it reading the SWR but also shown is the frequency readout. It then acts as a frequency counter, right? How accurate is it in that mode?

I'm considering getting one. Is it a kit or built and in a box? What kind of connectors does it have? Also, you mention in the write-up "by clicking on the Plot button" so does this mean that the unit works with a computer or is it possibly a touch-screen so you can tap the screen like with the V6...?

Hope you do not mind my questions.

Bob — KK5R

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 11:30:46 PM EDT, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:


Jerry,
We do sell a test set, it is called Antunio!
Except for the dummy load, the Antuino is really all you need to align any HF radio set. It can be used to test any radio well into UHF range as well as individual filters, including duplexers, amplifiers, mixers, etc. It can also measure input or output impedance match, antenna vswr and even act as a vtvm.
End of the plug.
- f



On Mon 26 Oct, 2020, 4:02 AM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io, <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io > wrote:
Page 6 has the test set Allen mentioned:  https://www.qrparci.org/qqsample/qqsample.pdf

A 7.050mhz crystal oscillator with an attenuator suitable for checking out a 40m receiver.
And a 50 ohm dummy load for the transmitter.

That would definitely be better than nothing at all for debugging a uBitx,
but hardly sufficient.

Could tell if the receiver works on 40m.
And could drive the uBitx power amp to check it out on 40m as well
if you do away with the cute trick of using one connector for
both signal generator and dummy load.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 02:25 PM, Allen Hill wrote:
Check out the TX/RX test circuit in January 2015 issue of QRP Quarterly on page 6 (shared by K1MBO).
Very simple and low cost.
This particular issue is the free download from their website.

QRPARCI.ORG

73
KI4QCK


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

 

Bob,

It has SMA connectors two of them. One output and one input.

When you press plot, it plots on its own screen. No PC required. No touch screen.

No freq. counter but you can measure indirectly in power mode.

It comes fully complete in a metal box..

Raj


At 26/10/2020, you wrote:
This looks very interesting. One specification was not shown, however. In the Antuino write-up, you show it reading the SWR but also shown is the frequency readout. It then acts as a frequency counter, right? How accurate is it in that mode?

I'm considering getting one. Is it a kit or built and in a box? What kind of connectors does it have? Also, you mention in the write-up "by clicking on the Plot button" so does this mean that the unit works with a computer or is it possibly a touch-screen so you can tap the screen like with the V6...?

Hope you do not mind my questions.

Bob — KK5R

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 11:30:46 PM EDT, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:


Jerry,
We do sell a test set, it is called Antunio!
Except for the dummy load, the Antuino is really all you need to align any HF radio set. It can be used to test any radio well into UHF range as well as individual filters, including duplexers, amplifiers, mixers, etc. It can also measure input or output impedance match, antenna vswr and even act as a vtvm.
End of the plug.
- f



On Mon 26 Oct, 2020, 4:02 AM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io, <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io > wrote:
Page 6 has the test set Allen mentioned:  https://www.qrparci.org/qqsample/qqsample.pdf

A 7.050mhz crystal oscillator with an attenuator suitable for checking out a 40m receiver.
And a 50 ohm dummy load for the transmitter.

That would definitely be better than nothing at all for debugging a uBitx,
but hardly sufficient.

Could tell if the receiver works on 40m.
And could drive the uBitx power amp to check it out on 40m as well
if you do away with the cute trick of using one connector for
both signal generator and dummy load.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 02:25 PM, Allen Hill wrote:
Check out the TX/RX test circuit in January 2015 issue of QRP Quarterly on page 6 (shared by K1MBO).
Very simple and low cost.
This particular issue is the free download from their website.

QRPARCI.ORG

73
KI4QCK


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Bob Lunsford
 

This looks very interesting. One specification was not shown, however. In the Antuino write-up, you show it reading the SWR but also shown is the frequency readout. It then acts as a frequency counter, right? How accurate is it in that mode?

I'm considering getting one. Is it a kit or built and in a box? What kind of connectors does it have? Also, you mention in the write-up "by clicking on the Plot button" so does this mean that the unit works with a computer or is it possibly a touch-screen so you can tap the screen like with the V6...?

Hope you do not mind my questions.

Bob — KK5R

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 11:30:46 PM EDT, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:


Jerry,
We do sell a test set, it is called Antunio!
Except for the dummy load, the Antuino is really all you need to align any HF radio set. It can be used to test any radio well into UHF range as well as individual filters, including duplexers, amplifiers, mixers, etc. It can also measure input or output impedance match, antenna vswr and even act as a vtvm.
End of the plug.
- f



On Mon 26 Oct, 2020, 4:02 AM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io, <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Page 6 has the test set Allen mentioned:  https://www.qrparci.org/qqsample/qqsample.pdf

A 7.050mhz crystal oscillator with an attenuator suitable for checking out a 40m receiver.
And a 50 ohm dummy load for the transmitter.

That would definitely be better than nothing at all for debugging a uBitx,
but hardly sufficient.

Could tell if the receiver works on 40m.
And could drive the uBitx power amp to check it out on 40m as well
if you do away with the cute trick of using one connector for
both signal generator and dummy load.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 02:25 PM, Allen Hill wrote:
Check out the TX/RX test circuit in January 2015 issue of QRP Quarterly on page 6 (shared by K1MBO).
Very simple and low cost.
This particular issue is the free download from their website. 

QRPARCI.ORG

73
KI4QCK


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Ashhar Farhan
 

Jerry,
We do sell a test set, it is called Antunio!
Except for the dummy load, the Antuino is really all you need to align any HF radio set. It can be used to test any radio well into UHF range as well as individual filters, including duplexers, amplifiers, mixers, etc. It can also measure input or output impedance match, antenna vswr and even act as a vtvm.
End of the plug.
- f



On Mon 26 Oct, 2020, 4:02 AM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io, <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Page 6 has the test set Allen mentioned:  https://www.qrparci.org/qqsample/qqsample.pdf

A 7.050mhz crystal oscillator with an attenuator suitable for checking out a 40m receiver.
And a 50 ohm dummy load for the transmitter.

That would definitely be better than nothing at all for debugging a uBitx,
but hardly sufficient.

Could tell if the receiver works on 40m.
And could drive the uBitx power amp to check it out on 40m as well
if you do away with the cute trick of using one connector for
both signal generator and dummy load.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 02:25 PM, Allen Hill wrote:
Check out the TX/RX test circuit in January 2015 issue of QRP Quarterly on page 6 (shared by K1MBO).
Very simple and low cost.
This particular issue is the free download from their website. 

QRPARCI.ORG

73
KI4QCK


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Jerry Gaffke
 

I think new board designs should consider the Si5351 in a QFN-20 package.
Last time I looked, the MSOP-10 package that everybody uses now (including the Raduino)
was around $1, all the QFN-20 variants were $10.  But the QFN-20's are now $2 on Mouser.

The QFN-20 has the following advantages over the usual MSOP-10:
  8 outputs instead of 3.   So could have signal generator outputs for testing on the uBitx.
  4 VDDO pins to supply power to the outputs instead of 1, reducing crosstalk
 
In the QFN-20 packages, you have the following choices:
  The Si5351A-B-GM has an A0 pin to select between a couple i2c chip addresses
  The Si5351B-B-GM has a VC control pin into a digital VCXO at the PLLB position.
  The Si5351C-B-GM has a CLKIN pin that takes an external reference between 10mhz and 100mhz,
    perhaps from a GPS module.  The A and B parts are spec'd only for use with a 25 to 27mhz crystals.

The SSEN pin (spread spectrum enable on Si5351A and Si5351B) is likely not of much interest to a ham.
The INTR pin (interrupt the host on loss of lock,  Si5351C only) might be of interest, 

Unfortunately, the QFN-20 has the same 0.5mm pin pitch as the MSOP-10, which is pretty tight.
The QFN-20 only has one ground pad, which is the large center square pad, could be accommodated
by drilling a large plated through hole, and soldering that big pad from the back of the board.
Or you could use solder paste and a toaster oven.

AN619 for the Si5351 says max VCO is 900mhz, output msynth of 4, so that suggests a max output of 225mhz.
But the datasheet does show 200mhz max as KE1L states, which is pretty fast for a CMOS output buffer.
Hans Summers, G0UPL of QRP-Labs found he could press the internal VCO up toward 1200mhz
to give an output of around 290mhz before it pooped out. 
Some versions of the Nanovna firmware try to run it at 300mhz max, but not all Si5351 parts can do this.

Hans found he could accurately lock two of the outputs in quadrature down to about 3.5mhz.

Some good discussions of the nitty gritty details around the Si5351:
https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/51935
https://groups.io/g/qrptech/topic/53562857#324

Jerry, KE7ER


Re: Electronic Test Device

Bob Lunsford
 

This has some promise if modified for use with our transceivers. However, it also shows in the circuit some possibilities for a simple design for a test oscillator. For example, R1 & R2 in the schematic could be a simple 1K or 500 Ohm pot with the wiper going to the output jack.

Bob — KK5R


Inline image



Re: memory manager

Evan Hand
 

N8KZ worked out a spreadsheet to use with KD8CEC Memory Manager for calibration.

https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/72183

I have not tried it, just passing on the information.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Electronic encoder (Not rotary)

Bob Lunsford
 

You are right. ALL grounds must be tied back to the service ground [rod]. Merely driving a ground rod in the ground near the radio room and tying everything to it is not per Code. A run of copper wire of the prescribed wire size must be run from that radio room ground back to the service ground to be acceptable to the Code. This is per a friend who designs large industry electrical systems.

Bob — KK5R

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 10:13:17 PM EDT, Evan Hand <elhandjr@...> wrote:


Gerard,
The correct grounding depends on the intent.  For safety, all grounds are to be at the same level.  A potential difference can be dangerous.  In large buildings that requires running new ground rods in the immediate area and tying all power ground connections to that grid.  Extrapolating that to your case, all should be at the same ground potential by bonding altogether.   I suspect that the oscilloscope is not grounded to the same point as the mains to the uBITX.  You can measure that with a good DMM on AC volts.

For the RF side of things, it is important to have a good solid earth ground close to the antenna and to have that ground also run into the shack.

Above are what I remember from my industrial power days.
73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Electronic encoder (Not rotary)

Evan Hand
 

Gerard,
The correct grounding depends on the intent.  For safety, all grounds are to be at the same level.  A potential difference can be dangerous.  In large buildings that requires running new ground rods in the immediate area and tying all power ground connections to that grid.  Extrapolating that to your case, all should be at the same ground potential by bonding altogether.   I suspect that the oscilloscope is not grounded to the same point as the mains to the uBITX.  You can measure that with a good DMM on AC volts.

For the RF side of things, it is important to have a good solid earth ground close to the antenna and to have that ground also run into the shack.

Above are what I remember from my industrial power days.
73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Bob Lunsford
 

Here's a (pricey) idea of what might work bu tfor our purpose, we need a simple oscillator with a controlled output.



A simple 1MHz crystal oscillator with a system of attenuating the output should be rich with harmonics that could be used for signal detection purposes but it would be helpful if there were some kind of modulation options so it is more easily detected aside from merely turning it off and on again. What say others in the group?

Bob — KK5R

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 8:34:34 PM EDT, Jerry Gaffke via groups.io <jgaffke@...> wrote:


I guess Gerald is pointing at this for $11.99:
   https://usa.banggood.com/CJMCU-5351-Si5351A-Si5351-I2C-25MHZ-Controller-Clock-Generator-Board-8KHz-To-160MHz-p-1256227.html?cur_warehouse=CN

They also have this for $3.99, if you can wait for a boat from China:
   https://usa.banggood.com/CJMCU-5351-Si5351A-Clock-Generator-Signal-Generator-Clock-8KHz-160MHz-p-1613912.html

There is cheaper still, Banggood probably buys from somebody here:
   https://www.aliexpress.com/af/si5351a%25252dbreakout%25252dboard.html?d=y&origin=n&SearchText=si5351a-breakout-board


Also check out offerings from EtherKit, Adafruit, and QRPLabs.
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2045
https://www.etherkit.com/rf-modules/si5351a-breakout-board.html
https://www.qrp-labs.com/synth.html

Note that most of those won't have the series caps we want when driving a mixer.

Most of the search hits for "si5351 board" seem to be going to Adafruit.

Si5351's are cheap, but if it's used we need to a microprocessor, display, knobs,
to configure it over the i2c bus.


If all you want is a crystal oscillator at a fixed frequency to check a receiver,
something like Mouser 520-5032MV-80-CNT would be easy to dead bug to a bare PCB.
Simpler than the K1MBO design to get going.

Jerry, KE7ER




On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 03:42 PM, Gerald Bramwell wrote:

Hi all,
This might be of interest from Banggood:-
 

CJMCU-5351 Si5351A Si5351 I2C 25MHZ Controller Clock Generator Board 8KHz To 160MHz

Gerald RS49875


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

That's an Asian clone of an Adafruit board that costs $7.95. It does include the SMA connectors, which are not included with the Adafruit board, but it's still overpriced. The Adafruit design is open source hardware, so the clones are legal so long as they don't pretend to be actual Adafruit boards. Note the absence of a logo on the Banggood board.

As KE7ER pointed out, similar boards from other Asian sellers (even another Banggood listing) are available for MUCH less than $12. Some of them even include an 8 pin header strip as well as the SMA connectors.

All the boards give their upper frequency limit as 160 MHz because Adafruit first sold them with the original Si5351A, which had that as its limit. (It was not enforced by the chip and they could go somewhat higher.) That was replaced by the Si5351A-B, which is now used in all current boards from all sources; that updated chip has a published limit of 200 MHz and can be pushed considerably higher to nearly 300 MHz. The boards are no more limited to 160 MHz than the bare chip is, which is to say not at all.

It's possible that Asian-made clones of the Si5351A might appear at some point, and those might not reach the same frequencies that the authentic Silicon Labs chips do. Clones of some popular chips have appeared, including microcontrollers, but I have heard no reports to date of clones of SiLabs clock generators. Authentic Si5351A chips in the 10MSOP package cost 92 cents in quantity one from major distributors, so there isn't much incentive to counterfeit them.

If you ever need to buy the chip separately to build or repair something, what you want is specifically an Si5351A-B-GT or Si5351A-B-GTR. No additional numbers; those signify chips with pre-programmed start frequencies and/or alternate I2C addresses. The difference between the two is that the version with the R at the end comes on tape and reel rather than in a tube. Same chips either way, so buy whichever is more convenient for you, available when you order, or cheaper.

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 8:34 PM Jerry Gaffke via groups.io <jgaffke=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I guess Gerald is pointing at this for $11.99:
   https://usa.banggood.com/CJMCU-5351-Si5351A-Si5351-I2C-25MHZ-Controller-Clock-Generator-Board-8KHz-To-160MHz-p-1256227.html?cur_warehouse=CN

They also have this for $3.99, if you can wait for a boat from China:
   https://usa.banggood.com/CJMCU-5351-Si5351A-Clock-Generator-Signal-Generator-Clock-8KHz-160MHz-p-1613912.html

There is cheaper still, Banggood probably buys from somebody here:
   https://www.aliexpress.com/af/si5351a%25252dbreakout%25252dboard.html?d=y&origin=n&SearchText=si5351a-breakout-board


Also check out offerings from EtherKit, Adafruit, and QRPLabs.
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2045
https://www.etherkit.com/rf-modules/si5351a-breakout-board.html
https://www.qrp-labs.com/synth.html

Note that most of those won't have the series caps we want when driving a mixer.

Most of the search hits for "si5351 board" seem to be going to Adafruit.

Si5351's are cheap, but if it's used we need to a microprocessor, display, knobs,
to configure it over the i2c bus.


If all you want is a crystal oscillator at a fixed frequency to check a receiver,
something like Mouser 520-5032MV-80-CNT would be easy to dead bug to a bare PCB.
Simpler than the K1MBO design to get going.

Jerry, KE7ER




On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 03:42 PM, Gerald Bramwell wrote:

Hi all,
This might be of interest from Banggood:-
 

CJMCU-5351 Si5351A Si5351 I2C 25MHZ Controller Clock Generator Board 8KHz To 160MHz

Gerald RS49875


Re: V6 TX on 15 and 20 meters

Curt
 

Okay let's figure out how RF is getting back to your rig on these bands more than the others. Antenna closer to the rig or a poorer match? Any wires outside the rig attached are suspect. Its a known matter that getting RF into the raduino does this type of thing. No issues here with my verticals or 2 element beam. Work it patiently.

73 curt


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Jerry Gaffke
 

I guess Gerald is pointing at this for $11.99:
   https://usa.banggood.com/CJMCU-5351-Si5351A-Si5351-I2C-25MHZ-Controller-Clock-Generator-Board-8KHz-To-160MHz-p-1256227.html?cur_warehouse=CN

They also have this for $3.99, if you can wait for a boat from China:
   https://usa.banggood.com/CJMCU-5351-Si5351A-Clock-Generator-Signal-Generator-Clock-8KHz-160MHz-p-1613912.html

There is cheaper still, Banggood probably buys from somebody here:
   https://www.aliexpress.com/af/si5351a%25252dbreakout%25252dboard.html?d=y&origin=n&SearchText=si5351a-breakout-board


Also check out offerings from EtherKit, Adafruit, and QRPLabs.
https://www.adafruit.com/product/2045
https://www.etherkit.com/rf-modules/si5351a-breakout-board.html
https://www.qrp-labs.com/synth.html

Note that most of those won't have the series caps we want when driving a mixer.

Most of the search hits for "si5351 board" seem to be going to Adafruit.

Si5351's are cheap, but if it's used we need to a microprocessor, display, knobs,
to configure it over the i2c bus.


If all you want is a crystal oscillator at a fixed frequency to check a receiver,
something like Mouser 520-5032MV-80-CNT would be easy to dead bug to a bare PCB.
Simpler than the K1MBO design to get going.

Jerry, KE7ER




On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 03:42 PM, Gerald Bramwell wrote:

Hi all,
This might be of interest from Banggood:-
 

CJMCU-5351 Si5351A Si5351 I2C 25MHZ Controller Clock Generator Board 8KHz To 160MHz

Gerald RS49875


Re: Electronic encoder (Not rotary)

Bob Lunsford
 

Since you have apparently eliminated a source for the noise, you might consider looking elsewhere. Maybe the noise is coming from another place.

Bob — KK5R

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, 12:39:05 PM EDT, Gerard <kabupos@...> wrote:


Evan,
Results of the tests:
The noise remains even after disconnecting the connection and its cables of nextion
Noise still exists, but less loud if I remove the module SI5153 (For me the continuous program to turn blind)
We can clearly see that the crude corresponds when sending data (Pulses) from the arduino (leg no 26 or 27 corresponding to the TX) don't remeber
I tried to put the jumpers resistors on the legs 26, 27 >> No improvement, same if I add a small capacitor.
but it is not the same type of mounting that I had done on the encoder (review the diagram)
Pulses come at the amplifier input. Weak and drowned in background noise.
You can see them better if the oscillo is connected without ground!! back to the ground of electrical connexion 220V?

And as already said, if I connect electrical ground on power ground, you ear 50HTZ.
So for me, the signal must interfere with lines on the copper, or there’s a mass loop, not obvious to find.
I spent my afternoon on this, so I’ll look again later
cdt


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Gerald Bramwell <gerald.bramwell@...>
 

Hi all,
This might be of interest from Banggood:-

CJMCU-5351 Si5351A Si5351 I2C 25MHZ Controller Clock Generator Board 8KHz To 160MHz

Gerald RS49875


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Jerry Gaffke
 

Page 6 has the test set Allen mentioned:  https://www.qrparci.org/qqsample/qqsample.pdf

A 7.050mhz crystal oscillator with an attenuator suitable for checking out a 40m receiver.
And a 50 ohm dummy load for the transmitter.

That would definitely be better than nothing at all for debugging a uBitx,
but hardly sufficient.

Could tell if the receiver works on 40m.
And could drive the uBitx power amp to check it out on 40m as well
if you do away with the cute trick of using one connector for
both signal generator and dummy load.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 02:25 PM, Allen Hill wrote:
Check out the TX/RX test circuit in January 2015 issue of QRP Quarterly on page 6 (shared by K1MBO).
Very simple and low cost.
This particular issue is the free download from their website. 

QRPARCI.ORG

73
KI4QCK


Re: Simple UBITX Test Set

Allen Hill
 

Check out the TX/RX test circuit in January 2015 issue of QRP Quarterly on page 6 (shared by K1MBO).
Very simple and low cost.
This particular issue is the free download from their website. 

QRPARCI.ORG

73
KI4QCK

2581 - 2600 of 84777