Date   

Re: IF shift needed for listening correctly V4 UBITX #bitx20help

rajesh huddar
 

Hi Evan,

Which memory manager version is this. May I request for the link. I have Ubitx ver3.

What should be the calibration value.

So also seek some inputs on eliminating audio distortion.

Thanks

Rajesh



On Thu, 25 Jun 2020, 15:45 Evan Hand, <elhandjr@...> wrote:
Yes, all of the calibrations are available in both the onboard software and the Memory Manager.  This does depend on which of the multiple Nextion screen files you have used for your upgrade.  In order to conserve memory, some of the versions removed the calibration graphic screen, and you need to use the yellow box.  The yellow box is on all versions as far as I know.

For the Memory Manager, you need to read and write the uBITX to get and then update after changes are made.  Remember that the Raduino needs to be completely powered down and restarted for some of the changes to be put into use.  This means the uBITX needs to be turned off, and the USB cable removed.  Another point on the Memory Manager is to always close the connection to the uBITX before you remove the USB cable, otherwise, you will need to close and reopen the Memory Manager to establish the connection.  I follow the convention of:
1 - reading the uBITX
2 - save the current config to a temp file
3 - make the changes
4 - write to the uBiTX
5 - completely power down the uBITX
6 - restart and test
7 - If all is good, go back to the Memory Manager, read the config, and then save it to a permanent file.

My personal experience with your symptoms was solved with the calibration process.

I hope this clarifies for you.
73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: V6 Delivery times #v6

Lee
 

Forgot to add that the Covid-19 warning was gone from the site.
--
Lee - N9LO  "I Void Warranties"

 


V6 Delivery times #v6

Lee
 

HFSIGNALS web site had a warning that due to Covid-19 they were temporally not shipping.   12 days ago I ordered one and they took my payment.  I sent an email to sales@... asking if it shipped and if there was a tracking number.  Got no reply.   This is my 4th kit I have ordered over the years and none have taken this long.   Anybody else experiencing a long delay?

Also is there a firmware update I should get?  Where would I download it and what improvements does it have?   Thank you for the help


--
Lee - N9LO  "I Void Warranties"

 


Re: Microphone appears dead

thomas.adair
 

Thank you 



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy A10e, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Bob Lunsford via groups.io" <nocrud222@...>
Date: 6/27/20 6:25 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Microphone appears dead

Try to find a local ham who will tell you if he/she can hear you when you transmit. I'm sure they'd be glad to do it.

We're all new to some degree or another. Don't let that lead to indecision. Grab it by the horns and never let it win over you. Keep at it and it will eventually work out.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 6:26:32 PM EDT, thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:


Thank you, for trying to help me but unfortunately, I am new to this, so my learning curve flat. Apparently this uBitx v6 is not for the novice.
 I don't have the proper test equipment.

 Looks like I have a lot of reading ahead me. Being at my age I probably need something that I can just plug in and start making contacts. 

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 04:20:08 PM CDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Also:

10) With the V6 connected to a dummy load, try transmitting while monitoring with an existing ham rig, if available, tuned to same frequency and in same mode. If volume is not turned down, you will probably hear a loud squawk from the monitoring receiver due to audio/free air feedback. Turn down monitoring receiver volume and try whispering into the microphone to see if transmitted signal is being received. The receiver can be disconnected from the antenna or it's antenna connector can be shorted out and the V6 can still be received if they are near each other.

I did this with my V6 and verified that there was modulation and that the signal was being received. However, a QRP watt meter between the V6 and dummy load will be required to know the power output. If you whistle into the mic, the tone should be the same on the monitoring receiver or, if not, it will indicate the difference in tuning/calibration on the V6 AND the monitoring receiver. If they are both on frequency, there should be no variation (beat signal) between the V6 transmitter and the receiver.

Note also that the SSB output will be lower than the actual peak power unless the watt meter is designed to read peak power. OR, if your dummy load has the feature, you can measure the voltage across the dummy load resistor on transmit and do the math to know the average/effective power delivered to the dummy load.

Hope that in here somewhere is something you can use and not have to set up a microphone test circuit. By the way, an audio signal tracer, if available, is a cheap and dirty way to see if the mic is working (as long as  bias voltage is applied to the mic) but it will only identify the existence of an audio signal. It will not tell you how strong the signal is (unless it's a top-of-the-line signal tracer) and will not tell you anything about signal quality or voice characteristics.

As indicated in the previous message by Arv, there are many ways to see if the mic is working. Let us know what you find.

By the way, I took the eletret microphone element from an non-working Family Radio el cheapo transceiver and I know it was working until the mode switch went belly-up. Therefore, you can try other elements but remember that all eletret elements are not the same in size or electrical design.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 3:29:40 PM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Several ways to test your electret microphone capsule.

1)  make up a simple adapter so you can connect its output 
to the audio  input of the receive side of your transceiver.

2)  Wire up an LM386 as a simple audio amplifier and connect 
the microphone output to this amplifier input.

3)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and measure the mike 
output with an oscilloscope.  Level should be around 45 to 50 
millivolts.

4) try your microphone on some other rig.

5) Wire up a microphone bias circuit and connect the microphone 
output to a pair of sensitive headphones.

6)  Use an external audio amplifier with input capacitive coupling 
and listen to audio from the microphone amplifier in your BITX.
This may be distorted due to mixer effects.

7)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to a record player input.

8)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to the audio input of a VCR or TV.

9)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to an amplified computer speaker.

When building the microphone bias circuit it could be helpful to 
include connection to the PTT switch through an LED and current 
limiting resistor so you can test PTT operation at the same time.

Arv
_._

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:58 AM thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:
How can I test my microphone to see if it is working? The radio receives well, but I not connect to anyone. With my digital voltmeter I unscrewed the jack, place the negative lead to the negative side of the jack and probed the center with the positive lead and actuated the PTT. 0 mV was the result.  


Re: Microphone appears dead

Bob Lunsford
 

Try to find a local ham who will tell you if he/she can hear you when you transmit. I'm sure they'd be glad to do it.

We're all new to some degree or another. Don't let that lead to indecision. Grab it by the horns and never let it win over you. Keep at it and it will eventually work out.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 6:26:32 PM EDT, thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:


Thank you, for trying to help me but unfortunately, I am new to this, so my learning curve flat. Apparently this uBitx v6 is not for the novice.
 I don't have the proper test equipment.

 Looks like I have a lot of reading ahead me. Being at my age I probably need something that I can just plug in and start making contacts. 

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 04:20:08 PM CDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Also:

10) With the V6 connected to a dummy load, try transmitting while monitoring with an existing ham rig, if available, tuned to same frequency and in same mode. If volume is not turned down, you will probably hear a loud squawk from the monitoring receiver due to audio/free air feedback. Turn down monitoring receiver volume and try whispering into the microphone to see if transmitted signal is being received. The receiver can be disconnected from the antenna or it's antenna connector can be shorted out and the V6 can still be received if they are near each other.

I did this with my V6 and verified that there was modulation and that the signal was being received. However, a QRP watt meter between the V6 and dummy load will be required to know the power output. If you whistle into the mic, the tone should be the same on the monitoring receiver or, if not, it will indicate the difference in tuning/calibration on the V6 AND the monitoring receiver. If they are both on frequency, there should be no variation (beat signal) between the V6 transmitter and the receiver.

Note also that the SSB output will be lower than the actual peak power unless the watt meter is designed to read peak power. OR, if your dummy load has the feature, you can measure the voltage across the dummy load resistor on transmit and do the math to know the average/effective power delivered to the dummy load.

Hope that in here somewhere is something you can use and not have to set up a microphone test circuit. By the way, an audio signal tracer, if available, is a cheap and dirty way to see if the mic is working (as long as  bias voltage is applied to the mic) but it will only identify the existence of an audio signal. It will not tell you how strong the signal is (unless it's a top-of-the-line signal tracer) and will not tell you anything about signal quality or voice characteristics.

As indicated in the previous message by Arv, there are many ways to see if the mic is working. Let us know what you find.

By the way, I took the eletret microphone element from an non-working Family Radio el cheapo transceiver and I know it was working until the mode switch went belly-up. Therefore, you can try other elements but remember that all eletret elements are not the same in size or electrical design.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 3:29:40 PM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Several ways to test your electret microphone capsule.

1)  make up a simple adapter so you can connect its output 
to the audio  input of the receive side of your transceiver.

2)  Wire up an LM386 as a simple audio amplifier and connect 
the microphone output to this amplifier input.

3)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and measure the mike 
output with an oscilloscope.  Level should be around 45 to 50 
millivolts.

4) try your microphone on some other rig.

5) Wire up a microphone bias circuit and connect the microphone 
output to a pair of sensitive headphones.

6)  Use an external audio amplifier with input capacitive coupling 
and listen to audio from the microphone amplifier in your BITX.
This may be distorted due to mixer effects.

7)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to a record player input.

8)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to the audio input of a VCR or TV.

9)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to an amplified computer speaker.

When building the microphone bias circuit it could be helpful to 
include connection to the PTT switch through an LED and current 
limiting resistor so you can test PTT operation at the same time.

Arv
_._

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:58 AM thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:
How can I test my microphone to see if it is working? The radio receives well, but I not connect to anyone. With my digital voltmeter I unscrewed the jack, place the negative lead to the negative side of the jack and probed the center with the positive lead and actuated the PTT. 0 mV was the result.  


Re: Microphone appears dead

thomas.adair
 

Thank you, for trying to help me but unfortunately, I am new to this, so my learning curve flat. Apparently this uBitx v6 is not for the novice.
 I don't have the proper test equipment.

 Looks like I have a lot of reading ahead me. Being at my age I probably need something that I can just plug in and start making contacts. 

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 04:20:08 PM CDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Also:

10) With the V6 connected to a dummy load, try transmitting while monitoring with an existing ham rig, if available, tuned to same frequency and in same mode. If volume is not turned down, you will probably hear a loud squawk from the monitoring receiver due to audio/free air feedback. Turn down monitoring receiver volume and try whispering into the microphone to see if transmitted signal is being received. The receiver can be disconnected from the antenna or it's antenna connector can be shorted out and the V6 can still be received if they are near each other.

I did this with my V6 and verified that there was modulation and that the signal was being received. However, a QRP watt meter between the V6 and dummy load will be required to know the power output. If you whistle into the mic, the tone should be the same on the monitoring receiver or, if not, it will indicate the difference in tuning/calibration on the V6 AND the monitoring receiver. If they are both on frequency, there should be no variation (beat signal) between the V6 transmitter and the receiver.

Note also that the SSB output will be lower than the actual peak power unless the watt meter is designed to read peak power. OR, if your dummy load has the feature, you can measure the voltage across the dummy load resistor on transmit and do the math to know the average/effective power delivered to the dummy load.

Hope that in here somewhere is something you can use and not have to set up a microphone test circuit. By the way, an audio signal tracer, if available, is a cheap and dirty way to see if the mic is working (as long as  bias voltage is applied to the mic) but it will only identify the existence of an audio signal. It will not tell you how strong the signal is (unless it's a top-of-the-line signal tracer) and will not tell you anything about signal quality or voice characteristics.

As indicated in the previous message by Arv, there are many ways to see if the mic is working. Let us know what you find.

By the way, I took the eletret microphone element from an non-working Family Radio el cheapo transceiver and I know it was working until the mode switch went belly-up. Therefore, you can try other elements but remember that all eletret elements are not the same in size or electrical design.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 3:29:40 PM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Several ways to test your electret microphone capsule.

1)  make up a simple adapter so you can connect its output 
to the audio  input of the receive side of your transceiver.

2)  Wire up an LM386 as a simple audio amplifier and connect 
the microphone output to this amplifier input.

3)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and measure the mike 
output with an oscilloscope.  Level should be around 45 to 50 
millivolts.

4) try your microphone on some other rig.

5) Wire up a microphone bias circuit and connect the microphone 
output to a pair of sensitive headphones.

6)  Use an external audio amplifier with input capacitive coupling 
and listen to audio from the microphone amplifier in your BITX.
This may be distorted due to mixer effects.

7)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to a record player input.

8)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to the audio input of a VCR or TV.

9)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to an amplified computer speaker.

When building the microphone bias circuit it could be helpful to 
include connection to the PTT switch through an LED and current 
limiting resistor so you can test PTT operation at the same time.

Arv
_._

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:58 AM thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:
How can I test my microphone to see if it is working? The radio receives well, but I not connect to anyone. With my digital voltmeter I unscrewed the jack, place the negative lead to the negative side of the jack and probed the center with the positive lead and actuated the PTT. 0 mV was the result.  


Re: Microphone appears dead

Bob Lunsford
 

Mic pinouts are not all the same. It can vary between manufacturers and depends on the designer. If you know that other mics are compatible with the V6 and what those mics can work with and if there is a matching correlation, then you can use it.

To know if the test is valid, check the pinouts for the Baofeng and for the V6.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 4:36:44 PM EDT, thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:


I connected the to my Baofeng hamdheld. No transmission. No LED on mic either.





Sent via the Samsung Galaxy A10e, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Evan Hand <elhandjr@...>
Date: 6/27/20 1:33 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Microphone appears dead

Thomas,

I would start by verifying that the CW transmission is working.  If not, then there is a power amp problem.  If you do get a reasonable amount of power out on CW, then the audio input is the next area to search.

What testing devices do you have besides the DVM?

Read through all of the messages in the link provided in my last message.  You can expand the single message by clicking on the 
"View/Reply Online (#xxxxx)" link in the email sent to you.  Then "View All n messages in Topic" where n is the number of messages in that topic or thread.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Microphone appears dead

Bob Lunsford
 

Also:

10) With the V6 connected to a dummy load, try transmitting while monitoring with an existing ham rig, if available, tuned to same frequency and in same mode. If volume is not turned down, you will probably hear a loud squawk from the monitoring receiver due to audio/free air feedback. Turn down monitoring receiver volume and try whispering into the microphone to see if transmitted signal is being received. The receiver can be disconnected from the antenna or it's antenna connector can be shorted out and the V6 can still be received if they are near each other.

I did this with my V6 and verified that there was modulation and that the signal was being received. However, a QRP watt meter between the V6 and dummy load will be required to know the power output. If you whistle into the mic, the tone should be the same on the monitoring receiver or, if not, it will indicate the difference in tuning/calibration on the V6 AND the monitoring receiver. If they are both on frequency, there should be no variation (beat signal) between the V6 transmitter and the receiver.

Note also that the SSB output will be lower than the actual peak power unless the watt meter is designed to read peak power. OR, if your dummy load has the feature, you can measure the voltage across the dummy load resistor on transmit and do the math to know the average/effective power delivered to the dummy load.

Hope that in here somewhere is something you can use and not have to set up a microphone test circuit. By the way, an audio signal tracer, if available, is a cheap and dirty way to see if the mic is working (as long as  bias voltage is applied to the mic) but it will only identify the existence of an audio signal. It will not tell you how strong the signal is (unless it's a top-of-the-line signal tracer) and will not tell you anything about signal quality or voice characteristics.

As indicated in the previous message by Arv, there are many ways to see if the mic is working. Let us know what you find.

By the way, I took the eletret microphone element from an non-working Family Radio el cheapo transceiver and I know it was working until the mode switch went belly-up. Therefore, you can try other elements but remember that all eletret elements are not the same in size or electrical design.

Bob — KK5R

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 3:29:40 PM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Several ways to test your electret microphone capsule.

1)  make up a simple adapter so you can connect its output 
to the audio  input of the receive side of your transceiver.

2)  Wire up an LM386 as a simple audio amplifier and connect 
the microphone output to this amplifier input.

3)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and measure the mike 
output with an oscilloscope.  Level should be around 45 to 50 
millivolts.

4) try your microphone on some other rig.

5) Wire up a microphone bias circuit and connect the microphone 
output to a pair of sensitive headphones.

6)  Use an external audio amplifier with input capacitive coupling 
and listen to audio from the microphone amplifier in your BITX.
This may be distorted due to mixer effects.

7)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to a record player input.

8)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to the audio input of a VCR or TV.

9)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to an amplified computer speaker.

When building the microphone bias circuit it could be helpful to 
include connection to the PTT switch through an LED and current 
limiting resistor so you can test PTT operation at the same time.

Arv
_._

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:58 AM thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:
How can I test my microphone to see if it is working? The radio receives well, but I not connect to anyone. With my digital voltmeter I unscrewed the jack, place the negative lead to the negative side of the jack and probed the center with the positive lead and actuated the PTT. 0 mV was the result.  


Re: Microphone appears dead

thomas.adair
 

I connected the to my Baofeng hamdheld. No transmission. No LED on mic either.





Sent via the Samsung Galaxy A10e, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Evan Hand <elhandjr@...>
Date: 6/27/20 1:33 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Microphone appears dead

Thomas,

I would start by verifying that the CW transmission is working.  If not, then there is a power amp problem.  If you do get a reasonable amount of power out on CW, then the audio input is the next area to search.

What testing devices do you have besides the DVM?

Read through all of the messages in the link provided in my last message.  You can expand the single message by clicking on the 
"View/Reply Online (#xxxxx)" link in the email sent to you.  Then "View All n messages in Topic" where n is the number of messages in that topic or thread.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Microphone appears dead

thomas.adair
 

I only have DVM



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy A10e, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Evan Hand <elhandjr@...>
Date: 6/27/20 1:33 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Microphone appears dead

Thomas,

I would start by verifying that the CW transmission is working.  If not, then there is a power amp problem.  If you do get a reasonable amount of power out on CW, then the audio input is the next area to search.

What testing devices do you have besides the DVM?

Read through all of the messages in the link provided in my last message.  You can expand the single message by clicking on the 
"View/Reply Online (#xxxxx)" link in the email sent to you.  Then "View All n messages in Topic" where n is the number of messages in that topic or thread.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Microphone appears dead

Arv Evans
 

Several ways to test your electret microphone capsule.

1)  make up a simple adapter so you can connect its output 
to the audio  input of the receive side of your transceiver.

2)  Wire up an LM386 as a simple audio amplifier and connect 
the microphone output to this amplifier input.

3)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and measure the mike 
output with an oscilloscope.  Level should be around 45 to 50 
millivolts.

4) try your microphone on some other rig.

5) Wire up a microphone bias circuit and connect the microphone 
output to a pair of sensitive headphones.

6)  Use an external audio amplifier with input capacitive coupling 
and listen to audio from the microphone amplifier in your BITX.
This may be distorted due to mixer effects.

7)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to a record player input.

8)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to the audio input of a VCR or TV.

9)  Wire up a microphone bias circuit and use it to connect your 
microphone to an amplified computer speaker.

When building the microphone bias circuit it could be helpful to 
include connection to the PTT switch through an LED and current 
limiting resistor so you can test PTT operation at the same time.

Arv
_._

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 9:58 AM thomas.adair <thomas.adair@...> wrote:
How can I test my microphone to see if it is working? The radio receives well, but I not connect to anyone. With my digital voltmeter I unscrewed the jack, place the negative lead to the negative side of the jack and probed the center with the positive lead and actuated the PTT. 0 mV was the result.  


Re: Microphone appears dead

Evan Hand
 

Thomas,

I would start by verifying that the CW transmission is working.  If not, then there is a power amp problem.  If you do get a reasonable amount of power out on CW, then the audio input is the next area to search.

What testing devices do you have besides the DVM?

Read through all of the messages in the link provided in my last message.  You can expand the single message by clicking on the 
"View/Reply Online (#xxxxx)" link in the email sent to you.  Then "View All n messages in Topic" where n is the number of messages in that topic or thread.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Microphone appears dead

thomas.adair
 

I have the v6 version



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy A10e, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Evan Hand <elhandjr@...>
Date: 6/27/20 12:15 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Microphone appears dead

Thomas,
What version of uBITX do you have?
Does the rig put out a signal in CW mode?  CW will test the transmit stages after the first mixer, creating a checkpoint that will point you in the correct direction.

This message has the circuit with the Baofeng mic for the v6 with voltages:
https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/79608

If you do not get approximately 11 volts at the tip of the mic plug, then I would start backtracing the circuit to R60 where you should have 12 volts when you activate the transmit mode.  It may be that the K1 relay is no functioning.

We will need more information to point you in the correct direction.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Re: Microphone appears dead

Evan Hand
 

Thomas,
What version of uBITX do you have?
Does the rig put out a signal in CW mode?  CW will test the transmit stages after the first mixer, creating a checkpoint that will point you in the correct direction.

This message has the circuit with the Baofeng mic for the v6 with voltages:
https://groups.io/g/BITX20/message/79608

If you do not get approximately 11 volts at the tip of the mic plug, then I would start backtracing the circuit to R60 where you should have 12 volts when you activate the transmit mode.  It may be that the K1 relay is no functioning.

We will need more information to point you in the correct direction.

73
Evan
AC9TU


Microphone appears dead

thomas.adair
 

How can I test my microphone to see if it is working? The radio receives well, but I not connect to anyone. With my digital voltmeter I unscrewed the jack, place the negative lead to the negative side of the jack and probed the center with the positive lead and actuated the PTT. 0 mV was the result.  


SolderSmoke Podcast #223 is available

Bill Meara
 


Re: ubitxv6 mic not working fine #ubitxv6

Amie C.
 

You need to or no audio.
--
AMIE N9OXO


Re: arduino-yun-rev-2 anyone looked at feasibility of swapping out the Arduino Uno for the Yun?

rpremo
 

There is a new version of the YUN rev2

https://store.arduino.cc/usa/arduino-yun-rev-2 ~$45

 

Jerry and Todd in addition to your explanation and I have thought of integrating with a RPI which I am already doing now but was interested in the form factor and the integration on one board but probably too many compromises.  If the Linux side is 64 MB so might be tough to do a lot with something like FLDigi integrated but should work fine for the python program I am using.

 

One thought I had but I think the RAM would be tight to do would be to run FlDigi as well on the Linux side.

 

The project that I am working on is grabbing sensor data from Arduino side and sending it using FlMsg forms for local data collection processing for FlDigi as outbound messages.  I like the idea of sharing the display for both the radio and the Python program and if enough RAM though I would imagine it might be pushing it based on the FlDigi RAM side

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry Gaffke via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 9:54 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] arduino-yun-rev-2 anyone looked at feasibility of swapping out the Arduino Uno for the Yun?

 

The Yun is pretty cool.
In addition to the Arduino compatible ATMega-32U4, it has an Atheros AR9331 running linux.

From https://store.arduino.cc/usa/arduino-yun
##############
The Atheros processor supports a Linux distribution based on OpenWrt named Linino OS. The board has built-in Ethernet and WiFi support, a USB-A port, micro-SD card slot, 20 digital input/output pins (7 of them can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and 3 reset buttons.
The Yún distinguishes itself from other Arduino boards by its ability to communicate with the Linux distribution onboard, offering a powerful networked computer with the ease of an Arduino. In addition to Linux commands like the cURL, you can write your own shell and python scripts for robust interactions. The Yún is similar to the Leonardo with the ATmega32u4, except that it has Linux on board. (has built-in USB communication, eliminating the need for a secondary processor).
##############

If I needed python and WiFi and such, I'd probably look first at a Raspberry Pi.
But the Yun is an interesting alternative, and would support all the Arduino ATMega libraries.

Jerry, KE7ER



it has On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 06:54 PM, Jack, W8TEE wrote:

Why would anyone be interested in swapping anything for a yun? It's essentially an Uno/Nano but at 10x the price. For less than half that price, the Teensy 4 has 2MB of flash vs 32KB, 1MB of SRAM  vs 2.5KB, and is clocked at 600MHz instead of 16MHz. I wanted to see what that really means for a book I'm working on, so I wrote a simple loop that does nothing but increment a counter for a 1 second time slice. The results;

 

     Yun                Teensy 4.0

    7,303             199,979,425

 

It's not a fair test because the counter needed to be a 32-bit long, but still...

 

To me, paying 10x the Nano price (and over 2x the Teensy 4.0 price) isn't worth it for a few more analog pins and 512 bytes of SRAM.

 

Jack, W8TEE

 


Re: arduino-yun-rev-2 anyone looked at feasibility of swapping out the Arduino Uno for the Yun?

Jerry Gaffke
 

The Yun is pretty cool.
In addition to the Arduino compatible ATMega-32U4, it has an Atheros AR9331 running linux.

From https://store.arduino.cc/usa/arduino-yun
##############
The Atheros processor supports a Linux distribution based on OpenWrt named Linino OS. The board has built-in Ethernet and WiFi support, a USB-A port, micro-SD card slot, 20 digital input/output pins (7 of them can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and 3 reset buttons.
The Yún distinguishes itself from other Arduino boards by its ability to communicate with the Linux distribution onboard, offering a powerful networked computer with the ease of an Arduino. In addition to Linux commands like the cURL, you can write your own shell and python scripts for robust interactions. The Yún is similar to the Leonardo with the ATmega32u4, except that it has Linux on board. (has built-in USB communication, eliminating the need for a secondary processor).
##############

If I needed python and WiFi and such, I'd probably look first at a Raspberry Pi.
But the Yun is an interesting alternative, and would support all the Arduino ATMega libraries.

Jerry, KE7ER



it has On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 06:54 PM, Jack, W8TEE wrote:

Why would anyone be interested in swapping anything for a yun? It's essentially an Uno/Nano but at 10x the price. For less than half that price, the Teensy 4 has 2MB of flash vs 32KB, 1MB of SRAM  vs 2.5KB, and is clocked at 600MHz instead of 16MHz. I wanted to see what that really means for a book I'm working on, so I wrote a simple loop that does nothing but increment a counter for a 1 second time slice. The results;
 
     Yun                Teensy 4.0
    7,303             199,979,425
 
It's not a fair test because the counter needed to be a 32-bit long, but still...
 
To me, paying 10x the Nano price (and over 2x the Teensy 4.0 price) isn't worth it for a few more analog pins and 512 bytes of SRAM.
 
Jack, W8TEE
 


Re: arduino-yun-rev-2 anyone looked at feasibility of swapping out the Arduino Uno for the Yun?

MVS Sarma
 

I understand tha YUN  is now a retired board with atmega32
While get much improved ones , cheap enough,  i feel we can try  better ones, especially when we use for multipke project trials. 

Regards
Sarma vu3zmv

On Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 9:34 am Todd Carney, <carneytf@...> wrote:
Possible reasons for using a Yun:

1. You already own one.
2. You want to use it for several projects and you prefer to standardize.
3. You want to use its linux and python integrations.
4. You want to use its WIFI and Ethernet capabilities.
5. You want to use it because you want to use it, and you don't have to explain yourself to strangers.

Also: "There are more things in heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." Hamlet, Act I, Scene 5