Date   

Re: IF shift needed for listening correctly V4 UBITX #bitx20help

andrea@...
 

the firmware version is correct. 

I can think that it is mostly related to a missing calibration.
I overwrite the firmware directly on the original nano but as you wrote this shouldn't affect the data in the eeprom. I also used the KD8CEC software manager for donwloading the data. The calibration settings are acccessible from the software?
In any case I think i'll go for calibration procedure as soon 

Thank you for the references.
Ciao
Andrea


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Richard West <rewest71@...>
 

You're right, Gordon. Thank you.


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

Rob:

I don't know what happened to them.

Jack, W8TEE

On Wednesday, June 24, 2020, 12:02:43 AM EDT, Robert Campbell <kg6hum@...> wrote:


Jack,

Did those developers move over to Volkswagen after Aztec shut down?

--
Rob Campbell
KG6HUM


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020, 10:20 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I remember Aztec C. Byte Magazine always used to benchmark C compilers and one of the tests was The Sieve of Eratosthenes. There were about a dozen C compilers in the tests, including mine, and while Aztec was so-so on most tests, it beat everyone on the Sieve test. It was later found out that they wrote a section in their compiler that could recognize the test code and, instead of compiling it, dumped out hand-tweaked assembler code for it. They pretty much died after that was discovered. I think they are also the only company that used -1 for NULL.

After that, there were a bunch of benchmark tests that use the Drystone and Whetstone benchmark tests. The problem with both of those tests is that they really didn't test the code generation of the compiler, but rather the implementation of the Standard C library function calls used in the tests. As a result, I wrote the Dhamstone (get it?) benchmark test ("Philosophy and Methodology of Benchmarks", Computer Language, Feb., 1986) as a better benchmark for testing code generation. Running that benchmark serious scrambled the test results!

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 1:04:33 PM EDT, Tom Frobase <tfrobase@...> wrote:


Jack,

 had your book on my shelf next to "K&R" and "Learning to Program in C".    We were using Astec "C"in those days with a $500 removable 10 Meg hard drive.  My staff always told me my favorite programming language was solder! ha ha ... tom, N3LLL

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 9:39 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I don't think any author thinks he can reach every potential reader successfully. But to say you've never read a single book that helped you seems unlikely. Indeed, to me it says that they aren't doing any combing of the book reviews before they buy, or they have unrealistic goals about reading a book. Also, I know that students who read the book and do the exercises will learn more than those who don't. For those, like yourself, who have a reading disability, perhaps they would be better served with a video or some other medium. Jeff makes it seem like he keeps buying books even though his mind is made up that they don't work for him. That seems like the repeat-the-same-experiment-and-expect-different-results problem. Simple solution for Jeff: Quit buying books.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 10:22:16 AM EDT, Christopher Miller <djmalak2k6@...> wrote:


I think Jeff makes a good point. I personally have a reading disability. Writing a book for everyone is impossible.

Chris 

--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Power supply

Dean Souleles
 


Re: Power supply

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi Dean,

I don't homebrew batteries. That would involve handling more hazardous materials than I would be comfortable. I homebrew the maintenance and charging gear. My approach is not entirely unique but some of my implementations might be close to unique in some cases. I am pretty sure other people - not necessarily hams - use the same methods. It is just too obvious. Additionally, methods from the past seem to be lost to younger people who can't be bothered to read those useless *olde* books from the 70s or 80s. Never mind about "prewar" (WW2) publications. We all know the laws of physics are completely different now <evil grin>. You might have a look at a charger for small batteries that use a series light bulb to accomplish a tame, tapered charge. Somebody here already mentioned the series bulb. Search on "lightbulb battery charger". It might be a good place to start and pretty safe too.

73,

Bill KU8H

bark less - wag more

On 6/23/20 11:39 PM, Dean Souleles wrote:
Bill -
100% with you on homebrew rigs.  I've spent the last few months building a 100% scratch built 40 meter SSB transceiver, and I have learned a ton along the way.  I've been documenting it on my blog- check out kk4das.blogspot.com if you have a few minutes.   But I will admit homebrewing batteries is outside of my area of interest.
73,
Dean
KK4DAS


Re: Power supply

MVS Negi
 

Could you give a bit more detail on the batteries and a link if possible? I was looking for a lightweight reasonably priced battery and to use a solar panel to charge them on my trips to the hills.
Mahendra
VU2MNX

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 7:07 PM Dean Souleles <dsouleles@...> wrote:
Bob - 

If you are interested in Lithium batteries the Talentcells are inexpensive and light-weight.  I used a Velcro strap to put on inside my uBitx case.  It weighs about 6 ounces and runs the uBitx all day long.   The 6 Amp hour version is now only $35 - with charger.  For me, at those prices its not worth spending any time to build anything. 

Lead acid batteries are so 20th century. :)

Dean
KK4DAS


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Evan Hand
 

Please review the following video before you do the calibration.  As is stated in this thread, it is very easy to get it wrong, and then can be difficult to get it back to working.

Since you have determined that it is off frequency, here is how Ashhar Farhan suggests recalibrating:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6LGXhS4_O8

73
Evan
AC9TU 


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

MVS Negi
 

I tried that, nothing happens...Checked with my friends on the Air, I find the freq out by different amount on different Bands. It is disconcerting. The receiver is pretty good though. 
Thanks

On Wed, Jun 24, 2020 at 1:04 PM Reed N <greenkid336600+groupsio@...> wrote:
Mahendra,

With the stock software, you need to press and HOLD for ~10 seconds before the menu will come up. Then you can adjust your oscillator cal to zero beat.


Reed


Re: DEFECTIVE RADUINO FOR V5

Support HF Signal
 

Hello Dave,

Kindly let us know the order ID, Date of Purchase and the Serial number of the board and the Raduino. Do send us a mail on sales@... and send us the required details.

Thanks and Regards,

Thomas
--
Support@...


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

Reed N
 

Mahendra,

With the stock software, you need to press and HOLD for ~10 seconds before the menu will come up. Then you can adjust your oscillator cal to zero beat.


Reed


Re: DEFECTIVE RADUINO FOR V5

Ashhar Farhan
 

Dave,
Whats defective? Please write ton sales@.... note that this group is a tech support group, independent of hf signals. We can help you find out what is wrong and fix it. 
- f

On Wed 24 Jun, 2020, 1:15 AM dave, <dgclifford@...> wrote:
IS IT POSSIBLE TO RETURN THE DEFECTIVE RADUINO THAT WAS SUPPLIED WITH MY V5    DAVE C  GW0NVF


Re: has the supply chain for the uBITX been affected by the covid-19

dave <dgclifford@...>
 

how does this apply to my v5 which was supplied with a defective raduino can you supply a new one (raduino)
  dave c


Re: uBitX assembled: bit of a challenge with alignment/bfo adj - Volume/switch knob fix

MVS Negi
 

I assembled my V6 rig. Works fine but the freq indicated is off the actual freq. How do I correct this? Pressing the Tuning Encoder knob does nothing to the menu...
Need advice !
Mahendra

On Wed, Jun 24, 2020 at 6:43 AM Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:
Different strokes for different folks!
This is just not your cup of tea 
Find something different, MoveOn and enjoy yourself.   


On Jun 23, 2020, at 16:12, Stephen KO4CVU <goinfishin1952@...> wrote:

Alex,
If you haven't already, make a "perfect pitch" with the Baofeng microphone. (That's when you throw it and it goes straight to the bottom of the trash can without touching the sides.) Buy a CB microphone with a built-in preamplifier. It made a big improvement on my SSB phone output, but I have not been able to achieve the power output that  Ashhar says he can get (see his post #48203.)
Stephen


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Robert Campbell
 

Jack,

Did those developers move over to Volkswagen after Aztec shut down?

--
Rob Campbell
KG6HUM


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020, 10:20 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I remember Aztec C. Byte Magazine always used to benchmark C compilers and one of the tests was The Sieve of Eratosthenes. There were about a dozen C compilers in the tests, including mine, and while Aztec was so-so on most tests, it beat everyone on the Sieve test. It was later found out that they wrote a section in their compiler that could recognize the test code and, instead of compiling it, dumped out hand-tweaked assembler code for it. They pretty much died after that was discovered. I think they are also the only company that used -1 for NULL.

After that, there were a bunch of benchmark tests that use the Drystone and Whetstone benchmark tests. The problem with both of those tests is that they really didn't test the code generation of the compiler, but rather the implementation of the Standard C library function calls used in the tests. As a result, I wrote the Dhamstone (get it?) benchmark test ("Philosophy and Methodology of Benchmarks", Computer Language, Feb., 1986) as a better benchmark for testing code generation. Running that benchmark serious scrambled the test results!

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 1:04:33 PM EDT, Tom Frobase <tfrobase@...> wrote:


Jack,

 had your book on my shelf next to "K&R" and "Learning to Program in C".    We were using Astec "C"in those days with a $500 removable 10 Meg hard drive.  My staff always told me my favorite programming language was solder! ha ha ... tom, N3LLL

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 9:39 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I don't think any author thinks he can reach every potential reader successfully. But to say you've never read a single book that helped you seems unlikely. Indeed, to me it says that they aren't doing any combing of the book reviews before they buy, or they have unrealistic goals about reading a book. Also, I know that students who read the book and do the exercises will learn more than those who don't. For those, like yourself, who have a reading disability, perhaps they would be better served with a video or some other medium. Jeff makes it seem like he keeps buying books even though his mind is made up that they don't work for him. That seems like the repeat-the-same-experiment-and-expect-different-results problem. Simple solution for Jeff: Quit buying books.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 10:22:16 AM EDT, Christopher Miller <djmalak2k6@...> wrote:


I think Jeff makes a good point. I personally have a reading disability. Writing a book for everyone is impossible.

Chris 

--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Power supply

Dean Souleles
 

Bill -

100% with you on homebrew rigs.  I've spent the last few months building a 100% scratch built 40 meter SSB transceiver, and I have learned a ton along the way.  I've been documenting it on my blog- check out kk4das.blogspot.com if you have a few minutes.   But I will admit homebrewing batteries is outside of my area of interest.

73,
Dean
KK4DAS






Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

No, I'm just assuming that everyone can use the Arduino IDE with the GCC compiler. Those on other OS's than Windows can use one of their emulators and it should be fine for learning. Once learned, they may want to branch out to something else.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:02:23 PM EDT, Roderick Hart <rwhartsr@...> wrote:


Jack are you going to provide a compiler like some of the training books did years ago. I learned at Bell Labs Training center in Piscataway. I used a CPM Microsoft compiler at home to really learn the language, but it was important to have an environment consistent with the tools used in training. The other really significant aid is to have the examples and exercises on a disk.

I was never a programmer but I for almost 20 years managed Unix operation and maintenance in a bell operating company. It was very helpful to know and understand what my people did. I completed all of the Bell Lab Desec


From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 9:52:49 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Beta Readers, closed!
 
Hi Bob:

Just about anything a ham might want to do can be done with "pure" C. Someone once said C allows you plenty of room to shoot yourself in the foot, and that's very true. However, C++ let's you blow your entire leg off. Some languages (e.g., Java) don't trust you so they do run-time checks (read: slow everything down) or don't give you those things that add power to the language (i.e., pointers). Java is C with training wheels. I try to use the C++ concept of encapsulation in my day-to-day C code, and I like the concept of polymorphism. However, inheritance offers a lot of ways to screw things up if you truly don't understand the language. For someone who wants to augment a hobby, C is more than good enough. However, because the Arduino libraries are written in C++ for the most part, the new book also has a chapter on C++, but with a better explanation of it...I think...than the current Beginning C book does. Adding more processors just made sense, too. So, I'm really interested in helping those who want to "make" something and see C as a component in doing that. I'll steal from C++ those things I think make someone a better C programmer. Above all, however, the journey should still be a fun one.

Jack, W8TEE



On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 3:48:32 PM EDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Jack, I've heard of C, and others like C+ and C++ which I assume are refinements of the basic C. Is this also your intention, to introduce basic C plus some enhancements? Just curious.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:39 AM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

My first C-language book was K&R (Kernighan & Ritchie) "The C Programming Language" in 1778.  
I still have a copy that Denis Ritchie signed for me at Bell Labs.  After that there were a plethora of 
new C-Language books, including yours.  Some were very good (yours) and some were not so good.
Thanks for the good work and for introducing many new programmers to C.  Other languages have 
come and gone, but C seems to be the basis that we still rely on for a high level language that can,
if necessary, get down and dirty at the machine language level.

 Arv
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:05 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff:

Yes, I have considered that. I wrote my first C book in 1982. It went through 3 editions and sold over 237,000 copies. It was also translated into 10 foreign languages, including Chinese, but I have no records on those sales. (Translation rights are a single-payment right-of-transfer.) BTW, as a frame of reference, a technical book that sells out the first printing (usually 5,000-10,000 copies) is considered a success.

This new book is my 20th programming book and is the distillation of 40 years of using C and over 30 years of teaching C plus owning a company that produced the first C compiler with an IDE. (Yep, even before Borland.) As to:
   
        I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I
        thought was self-standing. Most products made today put ease-of- learning and
        use as a nice-to-have option.

seems like a comment that is a bit harsh and painted with a too-wide brush. Perhaps you just aren't reading the right books?

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:52:59 PM EDT, Jeff Debes <jeff.debes@...> wrote:


Best of luck ......but  its a very tall order to write anything on that subject  that everyone can understand.
 People have different minds, abilities  and very different styles of learning .
Have you considered that the design of ‘C’ itself is cryptic and may never be easy for most to learn?   
I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I thought was self-standing.
Most products made today put ease-of- learning and use as a nice-to-have option.
But again, good luck with the effort.

Jeff Debes
AC2JB 






On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


All:

Is this a great group of people or what? Almost 100 individuals offered their time to help read my new intro C book. To everyone one, thank you!

There is no way that I can read and do justice to the comments from 100 readers, so I need to shut down the volunteer Beta readers appeal and consider it closed. I will likely thin the number to perhaps a dozen or so readers. I'll do this in the next two days.

Again, thank you for your support...it is sincerely appreciated.

73,
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

I heard about that library, but haven't downloaded it yet. WIll have to do that.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:25:23 PM EDT, Dean Souleles <dsouleles@...> wrote:


Jack,

Teensy 4 - lots flash, lots of SRAM, fast processor,

Where is the challenge in that?

When I started on real-time embedded systems we had a memory and clock cycle budget for each module.  I recall analyzing instruction sets to save a few clock cycles.  You learned to be efficient or you didn't keep your job.  Very happy not to have to do that anymore!

But you are right - it might be time to move up from the Nano.

I just got done adding CAT control to Pete Juliano's SimpleSSB that I built.  I used the CAT library by Pavel Milanes, CO7WT - https://github.com/pavelmc/FT857d - it is very simple but it does everything I need.   I was able to integrate in an afternoon.

73,
Dean
KK4DAS

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Dean Souleles
 

Jack,

Teensy 4 - lots flash, lots of SRAM, fast processor,

Where is the challenge in that?

When I started on real-time embedded systems we had a memory and clock cycle budget for each module.  I recall analyzing instruction sets to save a few clock cycles.  You learned to be efficient or you didn't keep your job.  Very happy not to have to do that anymore!

But you are right - it might be time to move up from the Nano.

I just got done adding CAT control to Pete Juliano's SimpleSSB that I built.  I used the CAT library by Pavel Milanes, CO7WT - https://github.com/pavelmc/FT857d - it is very simple but it does everything I need.   I was able to integrate in an afternoon.

73,
Dean
KK4DAS


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Roderick Hart
 

Jack are you going to provide a compiler like some of the training books did years ago. I learned at Bell Labs Training center in Piscataway. I used a CPM Microsoft compiler at home to really learn the language, but it was important to have an environment consistent with the tools used in training. The other really significant aid is to have the examples and exercises on a disk.

I was never a programmer but I for almost 20 years managed Unix operation and maintenance in a bell operating company. It was very helpful to know and understand what my people did. I completed all of the Bell Lab Desec


From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 9:52:49 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Beta Readers, closed!
 
Hi Bob:

Just about anything a ham might want to do can be done with "pure" C. Someone once said C allows you plenty of room to shoot yourself in the foot, and that's very true. However, C++ let's you blow your entire leg off. Some languages (e.g., Java) don't trust you so they do run-time checks (read: slow everything down) or don't give you those things that add power to the language (i.e., pointers). Java is C with training wheels. I try to use the C++ concept of encapsulation in my day-to-day C code, and I like the concept of polymorphism. However, inheritance offers a lot of ways to screw things up if you truly don't understand the language. For someone who wants to augment a hobby, C is more than good enough. However, because the Arduino libraries are written in C++ for the most part, the new book also has a chapter on C++, but with a better explanation of it...I think...than the current Beginning C book does. Adding more processors just made sense, too. So, I'm really interested in helping those who want to "make" something and see C as a component in doing that. I'll steal from C++ those things I think make someone a better C programmer. Above all, however, the journey should still be a fun one.

Jack, W8TEE



On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 3:48:32 PM EDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Jack, I've heard of C, and others like C+ and C++ which I assume are refinements of the basic C. Is this also your intention, to introduce basic C plus some enhancements? Just curious.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:39 AM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

My first C-language book was K&R (Kernighan & Ritchie) "The C Programming Language" in 1778.  
I still have a copy that Denis Ritchie signed for me at Bell Labs.  After that there were a plethora of 
new C-Language books, including yours.  Some were very good (yours) and some were not so good.
Thanks for the good work and for introducing many new programmers to C.  Other languages have 
come and gone, but C seems to be the basis that we still rely on for a high level language that can,
if necessary, get down and dirty at the machine language level.

 Arv
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:05 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff:

Yes, I have considered that. I wrote my first C book in 1982. It went through 3 editions and sold over 237,000 copies. It was also translated into 10 foreign languages, including Chinese, but I have no records on those sales. (Translation rights are a single-payment right-of-transfer.) BTW, as a frame of reference, a technical book that sells out the first printing (usually 5,000-10,000 copies) is considered a success.

This new book is my 20th programming book and is the distillation of 40 years of using C and over 30 years of teaching C plus owning a company that produced the first C compiler with an IDE. (Yep, even before Borland.) As to:
   
        I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I
        thought was self-standing. Most products made today put ease-of- learning and
        use as a nice-to-have option.

seems like a comment that is a bit harsh and painted with a too-wide brush. Perhaps you just aren't reading the right books?

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:52:59 PM EDT, Jeff Debes <jeff.debes@...> wrote:


Best of luck ......but  its a very tall order to write anything on that subject  that everyone can understand.
 People have different minds, abilities  and very different styles of learning .
Have you considered that the design of ‘C’ itself is cryptic and may never be easy for most to learn?   
I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I thought was self-standing.
Most products made today put ease-of- learning and use as a nice-to-have option.
But again, good luck with the effort.

Jeff Debes
AC2JB 






On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


All:

Is this a great group of people or what? Almost 100 individuals offered their time to help read my new intro C book. To everyone one, thank you!

There is no way that I can read and do justice to the comments from 100 readers, so I need to shut down the volunteer Beta readers appeal and consider it closed. I will likely thin the number to perhaps a dozen or so readers. I'll do this in the next two days.

Again, thank you for your support...it is sincerely appreciated.

73,
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Beta Readers, closed!

Jack, W8TEE
 

Hi Bob:

Just about anything a ham might want to do can be done with "pure" C. Someone once said C allows you plenty of room to shoot yourself in the foot, and that's very true. However, C++ let's you blow your entire leg off. Some languages (e.g., Java) don't trust you so they do run-time checks (read: slow everything down) or don't give you those things that add power to the language (i.e., pointers). Java is C with training wheels. I try to use the C++ concept of encapsulation in my day-to-day C code, and I like the concept of polymorphism. However, inheritance offers a lot of ways to screw things up if you truly don't understand the language. For someone who wants to augment a hobby, C is more than good enough. However, because the Arduino libraries are written in C++ for the most part, the new book also has a chapter on C++, but with a better explanation of it...I think...than the current Beginning C book does. Adding more processors just made sense, too. So, I'm really interested in helping those who want to "make" something and see C as a component in doing that. I'll steal from C++ those things I think make someone a better C programmer. Above all, however, the journey should still be a fun one.

Jack, W8TEE



On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 3:48:32 PM EDT, Bob Lunsford via groups.io <nocrud222@...> wrote:


Jack, I've heard of C, and others like C+ and C++ which I assume are refinements of the basic C. Is this also your intention, to introduce basic C plus some enhancements? Just curious.

Bob — KK5R

On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 11:28:39 AM EDT, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

My first C-language book was K&R (Kernighan & Ritchie) "The C Programming Language" in 1778.  
I still have a copy that Denis Ritchie signed for me at Bell Labs.  After that there were a plethora of 
new C-Language books, including yours.  Some were very good (yours) and some were not so good.
Thanks for the good work and for introducing many new programmers to C.  Other languages have 
come and gone, but C seems to be the basis that we still rely on for a high level language that can,
if necessary, get down and dirty at the machine language level.

 Arv
_._


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:05 AM Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff:

Yes, I have considered that. I wrote my first C book in 1982. It went through 3 editions and sold over 237,000 copies. It was also translated into 10 foreign languages, including Chinese, but I have no records on those sales. (Translation rights are a single-payment right-of-transfer.) BTW, as a frame of reference, a technical book that sells out the first printing (usually 5,000-10,000 copies) is considered a success.

This new book is my 20th programming book and is the distillation of 40 years of using C and over 30 years of teaching C plus owning a company that produced the first C compiler with an IDE. (Yep, even before Borland.) As to:
   
        I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I
        thought was self-standing. Most products made today put ease-of- learning and
        use as a nice-to-have option.

seems like a comment that is a bit harsh and painted with a too-wide brush. Perhaps you just aren't reading the right books?

Jack, W8TEE


On Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:52:59 PM EDT, Jeff Debes <jeff.debes@...> wrote:


Best of luck ......but  its a very tall order to write anything on that subject  that everyone can understand.
 People have different minds, abilities  and very different styles of learning .
Have you considered that the design of ‘C’ itself is cryptic and may never be easy for most to learn?   
I never encountered any programming language book ( C or otherwise) that I thought was self-standing.
Most products made today put ease-of- learning and use as a nice-to-have option.
But again, good luck with the effort.

Jeff Debes
AC2JB 






On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Jack, W8TEE via groups.io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


All:

Is this a great group of people or what? Almost 100 individuals offered their time to help read my new intro C book. To everyone one, thank you!

There is no way that I can read and do justice to the comments from 100 readers, so I need to shut down the volunteer Beta readers appeal and consider it closed. I will likely thin the number to perhaps a dozen or so readers. I'll do this in the next two days.

Again, thank you for your support...it is sincerely appreciated.

73,
Jack, W8TEE

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Jack, W8TEE

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Jack, W8TEE


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Jack, W8TEE

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