Date   

Re: Ventilator

Howard Fidel
 

I am a medical device expert. If I can help in anyway, let me know. You can find my bio here:

http://w2hff.xyz/about/default.html

My personal email is howard@...

Howard


On 3/22/2020 4:33 PM, Gordon Gibby wrote:
A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.   They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go; 

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.   They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves. 

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches. 
 
Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z




Re: Ventilator

Jack, W8TEE
 

Use

jack52443@...

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 5:08:42 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Jack, can you send me a personal email address to docvacuumtubes@ gmail.com ?  The folks at QRZ do not want me using their services. 




On Mar 22, 2020, at 17:03, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:


Gordon:

Let me know if I can help.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 4:33:49 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.  They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.  They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z



--
Jack, W8TEE
<Video.mov>

--
Jack, W8TEE


Ventilator

Gordon Gibby
 

Thanks to many of you who have stepped up and are deluging with offers of help. Sem has a place where you sign up, and I don’t understand all of that, but he is used to managing projects. all I did was keep people asleep & alive

We took the very prototype system and hooked it to a mechanical test lung and ran it from an air compressor and here is a video of it working. After a few seconds I finally realized I needed to turn to the right so you could see the valve & the ventilator. This particular model uses a fancy balloon inside to shut off the expiratory port during inspiration. However the electronics I built can control a second valve on expiration as well


This simple system is actually very useful— And it’s the kind of technology that ham radio guys understand.




Thanks for all of the interest.
Having a manufacture like Ashar and software engineers and guys with lots of experience will help out a lot. I suspect my little part is finished

Gordon


Re: Ventilator

Bob Benedict, KD8CGH
 

Gordon
  I have arduinos, PIs, breadboards, parts I can use for prototype testing. I can hack code (not elegant), but I'm not an electronics design expert.
   I can also help with design, printing and testing of 3D FDIM parts that might include connectors, adapters, ...
 
     Bob Benedict   KD8CGH, rkayakr at gmail
     retired engineer
     32 years service in new product & process development


Re: Ventilator

Jack, W8TEE
 

I can do that and we'll work from private email. People who want to be involved let me know using this email address:

    jack52443@...

and I will put you on a cc list.

If you don't hear from me immediately, I'll be away from my computer for several hours, but will try to get back to eveyone before midnight EDT. (Too old to think in terms of zulu.)

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 5:06:01 PM EDT, Ashhar Farhan <farhanbox@...> wrote:


Gordon and guys
I have volunteered with the open source ventilators group. India will need this more than anyone else. We are potentially looking at a death toll of 10 million without the ventilators, (no kidding). let's take this offline (Jack, will you form a cc list?) I dont want to spook others with the grimness all around. 
73. f

On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 2:33 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Gordon:

Let me know if I can help.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 4:33:49 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.  They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.  They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z



--
Jack, W8TEE


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Ventilator

Gordon Gibby
 

Jack, can you send me a personal email address to docvacuumtubes@ gmail.com ?  The folks at QRZ do not want me using their services. 




On Mar 22, 2020, at 17:03, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:


Gordon:

Let me know if I can help.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 4:33:49 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.  They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.  They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z



--
Jack, W8TEE
<Video.mov>


Re: Ventilator

Ashhar Farhan
 

Gordon and guys
I have volunteered with the open source ventilators group. India will need this more than anyone else. We are potentially looking at a death toll of 10 million without the ventilators, (no kidding). let's take this offline (Jack, will you form a cc list?) I dont want to spook others with the grimness all around. 
73. f

On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 2:33 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Gordon:

Let me know if I can help.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 4:33:49 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.  They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.  They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z



--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Ventilator

Gordon Gibby
 

Perfect.  I’m going to forward this



On Mar 22, 2020, at 17:03, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:


Gordon:

Let me know if I can help.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 4:33:49 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.  They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.  They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z



--
Jack, W8TEE
<Video.mov>


Re: Ventilator

ajparent1/kb1gmx <kb1gmx@...>
 

Gordon,

Over pressure and under pressure is actually a small differential
more than that and it can cause damage.

The basic mechanism has two factors management and reliability of
the system.  The latter has to insure there are no hard transients
or misses.

The older way was the box with the head out, iron lung, though the box
could easily be plywood glued up.  A variable displacement bellows d
id the work with a motor.

Allison
---------------------------------
No direct email, it goes to bit bucket due address harvesting in groups.IO


Re: Ventilator

Jack, W8TEE
 

Gordon:

Let me know if I can help.

Jack, W8TEE

On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 4:33:49 PM EDT, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


A bit off topic!  I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe  to direct compressed oxygen gas.  They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s.  Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters,  set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2.  Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30.  They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure.  The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group.  my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly.  And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z



--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Ventilator

_Dave_ AD0B
 

Gordon Atta boy. 
--
73
Dave
ADOB
Raduino bracket and Ham_Made_Keys


Re: V6 Baofang Mic Replacement

Jim Willis
 

Thanks Raj!

 

I’ve am having fun with my uBITx and have learned SO much from “building” and calibrating the rig.

 

Hats off and a bow, to Ashhar Farhan and the hfsignals crew!

 

DE Jim KX4TD

 

From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> On Behalf Of Raj vu2zap
Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2020 10:39
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] V6 Baofang Mic Replacement

 

Genius! work of art!

Raj

At 22/03/2020, you wrote:

Hi Don,
 
I made my own microphone and coffee.
 
A picture containing indoor, table, cup, coffee

Descri
 
73,
 
Jim KX4TD
 


Ventilator

Gordon Gibby
 

A bit off topic! I got asked to help build a ventilator for a low-cost application to save lives in COVID-19. A few brilliant engineers at the University of Florida are building a ventilator using cheap lawn sprinkler valves & pvc pipe to direct compressed oxygen gas. They needed a control system to manage the inspiratory and expiratory valves.

With What I have learned from Farhan and everyone here, I suggested the Arduino was the way to go;

Last night and today I started building the little transistor drivers to handle the sprinkler valves. The only NPN power transistors I could find in the entire house were 2N3055s. Then I wrote a simple program to read a potentiometer to adjust ventilatory rate, and for starters, set the I to E ratio at the normal 1 to 2. Using the potentiometer, the respiratory rate can be varied from 10 to 30. They have simple spring mechanisms to create positive end expiratory pressure. The prototype is working on my kitchen table, and I’m waiting for the mechanical engineer to drive over with the plumbing apparatus and the valves.

Your building this open source, some of you really bright folks might want to jump in and help them with the software, if so email me and I will help get you into the group. my part was just the simple transistor switches.

Ashar— We may have a new product for you to build quickly. And I’m sure you could make it a lot better


Gordon Gibby KX4Z


Re: PA Used in G6 LBQ

John Faivre
 

I’m thinking about using the amps band selection to select input pads. The band is selected using frequency from CAT. I’ll see if it is necessary when I see the actual performance of the amp. Stated Max is 10 watts, min for full power is around 3, depending on the band.  I get about 12w on 40 and 3w on 15 on my uBitx.

thanks for the suggestions

--
John Faivre WA9SGD


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Tom, wb6b
 

On Sun, Mar 22, 2020 at 09:21 AM, <wetzk@...> wrote:
I looked and did not see this mentioned and thought it might come in handy,
It is from the makers of the Pic Microcontroller but many of the circuits work fine with others like the ATtiny's.
https://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/devicedoc/01146b.pdf
Hi,

Looks like quite a number of interesting Tips and Tricks, as the title suggests. This is a good collection of solutions much like the old Application Handbooks published by National Semiconductor and others. 

Which company used to publish the App Notes with the little cartons of ICs doing things related to the text of the article?

Many years ago I worked for a small electronics company and we wanted to write an instruction manual along the same lines. We were able to locate the artist. He was retired, living on a sailboat in Sausalito if I recall. 

https://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/devicedoc/01146b.pdf

Tom, wb6b


Re: Setting CW type on 6.1

kbtgw <k2tgw@...>
 

.Thank you Reed, that was the trick.  My lack of patience would never have allowed me to hold the button down that long.
  Les,  K2TGW


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

wetzk@...
 

I looked and did not see this mentioned and thought it might come in handy,
It is from the makers of the Pic Microcontroller but many of the circuits work fine with others like the ATtiny's.
https://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/devicedoc/01146b.pdf


Re: Setting CW type on 6.1

Reed N
 

On stock software, press and hold the button for 10 seconds or so to get to the menu


Reed


Re: Setting CW type on 6.1

kbtgw <k2tgw@...>
 

Thanks but that only seems to give me "fast tune" on/off.?
Les,  K2TGW


Re: V6 Baofang Mic Replacement

q q
 

James

Take a look here  ----->>  https://www.electronicsurplus.com/audio/microphones

I would just buy a good quality mic electret element and fit it into the Baofeng case you already have.

Bob

10761 - 10780 of 87242