Date   

Re: uBitX v6 arrived today - information I found while waiting.

Mike WA0YCN
 

Dean,

 

I used the 50 mhz tap board - https://www.sdr-kits.net/PAT-Board-50MHz

Figuring things out was a little complicated as Iain’s article about how he did it was very informative, but didn’t provide all the details about what he was doing in the Raduino software.  He made things simple but the major shortcoming is the narrow bandwidth of the second IF since he taps it after the filter.  In his Raduino code, when you select SDR, it switches the second IF frequency from 11.059 mhz to the value set through uBitx Manager (he suggests 30 mhz) and mutes the audio on the uBitx (since there will be a few milliseconds offset between the rig and the SDR software).  He suggests a 30 mhz to get into range for the $20 RTL-SDR dongle.  Then you set the same offset in the SDR software so that OmniRig keeps the display in sync. 

 

When you tap the first IF, the bandwidth limitation is no longer an issue.  I picked up the signal across R16, and got the voltage for the tap board in the same vicinity off the collector of Q12.  I’m using SDR-Radio Console, its External Radio plug-in, and OmniRig as Iain suggested.  In External Radio, I set the IF frequency to 45.002 mhz but also had to check the setting to invert the spectrum to make things coordinate in the same direction. 

 

I hope this helps.  Good luck.

 

Regards,

 

Mike


Re: automatic magnetic loop adjustment

Jack, W8TEE
 

Mornin' Mark:

To cover 40M-20M, the cap needs to span about 15pF to 120pF. The one shown was tested to 200W with no arcing. There's a table in the ARRL handbook that discusses gap spacing and power, but I think ours is 3.5mm. If you're using a vacuum var cap at 100W, you would want at least 5KV rating.

I hope this helps!

73,
Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, March 6, 2020, 10:16:01 AM EST, Mark/airchecklover <mdh@...> wrote:


Jack, I've been following your loop development and must congratulate you guys on doing everything right!  Great build quality.  You have gone to great lengths to optimize - or should I say minimize in terms of resistance - every aspect of signal flow.  That baby should come with a warning ....

EXTREME MAGNETIC FIELDS  PRESENT  :-)

 

What is the capacitor?  Range and voltage?  Antenna should handle how many watts?

(ha, or do I have to wait to find out ....)

 

73, Mark

KD9NOO


--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: automatic magnetic loop adjustment

Mark/airchecklover
 

Jack, I've been following your loop development and must congratulate you guys on doing everything right!  Great build quality.  You have gone to great lengths to optimize - or should I say minimize in terms of resistance - every aspect of signal flow.  That baby should come with a warning ....

EXTREME MAGNETIC FIELDS  PRESENT  :-)

 

What is the capacitor?  Range and voltage?  Antenna should handle how many watts?

(ha, or do I have to wait to find out ....)

 

73, Mark

KD9NOO


Re: automatic magnetic loop adjustment

Mark/airchecklover
 

Miguel,

I do not speak a word of Portugese but still could understand your video.  Excellent work my friend!

73, Mark

KD9NOO


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi,

I do recall a ham who hid his Icom 2AT two meter walkie under the driver seat in his car in high summer. He left it there for the entire work day. After he took it out from under that seat (very hot in the car). It started to work and after a second or two it quit. I replaced a transistor that had failed. At that time we all followed that practice. We decided when we removed the hidden radio (or had a mobile radio mounted in the car) we would wait for it to cool down a little *before* turning it on. I am sure hams with mobile radios in their cars do not consider that and have not mentioned it here before. Maybe this accounts for some mysterious radio failures.

That transistor may already have been on the edge right from the transistor manufacturer. In part specs there used to be two maximum part temperatures (are there still?). One was for temperature on the shelf (storage) and the other was for 'powered on'. The powered on was lower. Both were very high temps where we and our dogs would not survive but the radio would. Those parts do survive soldering. Use your best judgement. Waiting for a hot car to cool down a little is not a great imposition.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 3/5/20 7:28 PM, Richard Spohn wrote:
My bad, mixed up C and F. Still not a good idea, IMHO. - Rich
--
bark less - wag more


Re: automatic magnetic loop adjustment

Miguel Angelo Bartie
 

Hello Mark Muller

I have 2 videos also:
first prototype :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si1GAlZDfq4&t=80s

And the best second video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZiuSQSslhg&t=2s

73 de py2ohh Miguel


Re: CEC 1.2 memory manager error Receive length 1/1027

Mike G4GOU
 

I find that if I plug the USB cable in before turning on the power to the uBitX then Memory Manager and CAT work, but if I have the power on the uBitX and then connect the USB cable they don't.

I am wondering if it is related to this issue - http://www.hamskey.com/2018/01/ubitx-auto-reset-problem-and-solution.html?m=1

73 Mike
EA7KIP/G4GOU


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Tom, wb6b
 

On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 04:58 PM, Arv Evans wrote:
The NuMaker UNO also looks interesting.
Yes it does.

What is cool is that they include a second microprocessor on the board that works as a full in-circuit programmer and debugger. Something you have to buy separately for the Nano and most other Arduino boards. 

Here is something similar from ST with the same processor chip as the Blue Pills. It has a second chip programmed to be a built in STLink interface, the same thing as people buy separately in order to program their Blue Pill boards. ST has smaller Nano sized developer boards, also.

I believe I've seen 32 bit processor boards that claim they are Nano pinout compatible. Maybe that would be a way to upgrade the processor on the uBitx. But sprinkling in a few 24 cent processors to do additional tasks around the radio board could be a good way to go. Especially if they are doing simple tasks (like read a voltage, click a relay, supply an adjustable voltage for bias or a gain control circuit, control a fan, monitor SWR and such, under control of the main processor) that are not likely to need firmware upgrades. Leave the firmware upgrades to the main processor. 

https://www.st.com/content/st_com/en/products/evaluation-tools/product-evaluation-tools/mcu-mpu-eval-tools/stm32-mcu-mpu-eval-tools/stm32-nucleo-boards/nucleo-f103rb.html

The Nuvoton board provides an Arduino IDE. There is Arduino IDE support for some of the ST developer boards, too.

The 32 bit chips are not in the ridiculously cheap 24 cent range, but they are under a couple of bucks, some under a buck. So not bad price wise. 

Tom, wb6b


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Arv Evans
 

The NuMaker UNO also looks interesting.
_._


On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 3:37 PM GM4CID <gm4cid@...> wrote:
How about their NuMaker Uno (Arduino Compatible), details at 

https://direct.nuvoton.com/en/numaker-uno

Looks like Arduino IDE can be used.

73, Bob GM4CID


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Arv Evans
 

140C = 284F, so probably will not get that hot, even in an automobile setting in the sun.
_._


On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 2:12 PM Richard Spohn <wb2gxm@...> wrote:
This brings up a point worth mentioning:  beware of leaving your uBitx
-- or any other project with SMT boards -- in a hot vehicle in the
Summer months!  -- Rich WB2GXM

On 3/5/20, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:
> On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 10:19 AM, AC9NM - Jerry Ponko wrote:
>
>>
>> low temperature solder paste
>
> Wow, melts at only 140C. I may have to get some of that. Particularly if I
> start experimenting with some of the conductive inks that claim to be
> solderable.
>
> I definitely won't make any automotive projects, engine compartment or
> dashboard, projects with this solder paste.
>
> Tom, wb6b
>
>
>
>




Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Tom, wb6b
 

On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 02:59 PM, GM4CID wrote:
NuMaker Uno (Arduino Compatible),
That's cool. These look like 32 bit processor boards. The 24 cent processors are 8 bit. 

However, I'll check the prices of their 32 bit processors. May not be 24 cents but still might be good.

Tom, wb6b


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Richard Spohn
 

My bad, mixed up C and F. Still not a good idea, IMHO. - Rich

On 3/5/20, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:
Hi,

140 C is far past the boiling point of water. It does not get that hot
in your car. Mighty uncomfortable. Maybe even lethal to living
creatures. But water bottles I have always kept in my car *never*
boiled. So temps below 100 C.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 3/5/20 4:12 PM, Richard Spohn wrote:
This brings up a point worth mentioning: beware of leaving your uBitx
-- or any other project with SMT boards -- in a hot vehicle in the
Summer months! -- Rich WB2GXM

On 3/5/20, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:
On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 10:19 AM, AC9NM - Jerry Ponko wrote:


low temperature solder paste
Wow, melts at only 140C. I may have to get some of that. Particularly if
I
start experimenting with some of the conductive inks that claim to be
solderable.

I definitely won't make any automotive projects, engine compartment or
dashboard, projects with this solder paste.

Tom, wb6b





--
bark less - wag more




Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

GM4CID
 

How about their NuMaker Uno (Arduino Compatible), details at 

https://direct.nuvoton.com/en/numaker-uno

Arduino IDE & Board Installation Guide

  1. Download and Install the Nu-Link USB Driver.
  2. Download Arduino IDE from https://www.arduino.cc/
  3. Run Arduino IDE installer to install it on PC.
  4. Run Arduino IDE.
    Go to File → Preferences, enter the following URL to textbox of ‘Additional Board Manager URLs’
    https://raw.githubusercontent.com/OpenNuvoton/NuMaker-UNO/master/package_nuvoton_index.json
  5. Arduino IDE : go to Tools → Board → Boards Manager
  6. NuMaker UNO will show up on the list, select NuMaker UNO and click install.
    After the package download is finished, go to Tools → Board and select NuMaker UNO to use it.

73, Bob GM4CID


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Bill Cromwell
 

Hi,

140 C is far past the boiling point of water. It does not get that hot in your car. Mighty uncomfortable. Maybe even lethal to living creatures. But water bottles I have always kept in my car *never* boiled. So temps below 100 C.

73,

Bill KU8H

On 3/5/20 4:12 PM, Richard Spohn wrote:
This brings up a point worth mentioning: beware of leaving your uBitx
-- or any other project with SMT boards -- in a hot vehicle in the
Summer months! -- Rich WB2GXM
On 3/5/20, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:
On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 10:19 AM, AC9NM - Jerry Ponko wrote:


low temperature solder paste
Wow, melts at only 140C. I may have to get some of that. Particularly if I
start experimenting with some of the conductive inks that claim to be
solderable.

I definitely won't make any automotive projects, engine compartment or
dashboard, projects with this solder paste.

Tom, wb6b



--
bark less - wag more


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Richard Spohn
 

This brings up a point worth mentioning: beware of leaving your uBitx
-- or any other project with SMT boards -- in a hot vehicle in the
Summer months! -- Rich WB2GXM

On 3/5/20, Tom, wb6b <wb6b@...> wrote:
On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 10:19 AM, AC9NM - Jerry Ponko wrote:


low temperature solder paste
Wow, melts at only 140C. I may have to get some of that. Particularly if I
start experimenting with some of the conductive inks that claim to be
solderable.

I definitely won't make any automotive projects, engine compartment or
dashboard, projects with this solder paste.

Tom, wb6b




Re: automatic magnetic loop adjustment

Murray Wills (ZL2IQ)
 

This looks fantastic Jack. Can’t wait to see the article. Murray ZL2IQ


From: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io> on behalf of Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: Friday, March 6, 2020 9:58:36 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io <BITX20@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BITX20] automatic magnetic loop adjustment
 
Al Peter (AC8GY) and I have an article in the Feb. 2020 issue of Rad Com that describes our Double-Double Mag Loop:

Inline image

It is a 3' diameter loop, but the double configuration raises its efficient from about 10% to 50% on 40M and over 90% on 20M. We tested the remote control unoit at Field Day last year using 100' of cable and it worked fine. Tuning is done by Fast Tune (i.e., previously-stored values in EEPROM) and then fine tuned if necessary. All bands can get the SWR to 1.2 or less. The control unit uses the STM32F103 ("Blue Pill"). The cap can be air or vacuum (high power).

It's probably not a good choice for pedestrian mobile use, but those who face HOA restrictions might find it useful.


Jack, W8TEE






On Thursday, March 5, 2020, 1:48:26 PM EST, Mark Muller <markvmuller@...> wrote:


Excellent Project!

For some reason, the link above did not work in my browser, and perhaps others might have the same problem. Hopefully this link is operational: https://www.qsl.net/py2ohh/trx/loopauto/loopauto.html

There seems to be some improvement to the original work here: https://www.qsl.net/py2ohh/trx/loopauto2/loopauto2.html 

Parabéns Miguel! 73 de N5KNG (Mark Muller)

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: automatic magnetic loop adjustment

Jack, W8TEE
 

Al Peter (AC8GY) and I have an article in the Feb. 2020 issue of Rad Com that describes our Double-Double Mag Loop:

Inline image

It is a 3' diameter loop, but the double configuration raises its efficient from about 10% to 50% on 40M and over 90% on 20M. We tested the remote control unoit at Field Day last year using 100' of cable and it worked fine. Tuning is done by Fast Tune (i.e., previously-stored values in EEPROM) and then fine tuned if necessary. All bands can get the SWR to 1.2 or less. The control unit uses the STM32F103 ("Blue Pill"). The cap can be air or vacuum (high power).

It's probably not a good choice for pedestrian mobile use, but those who face HOA restrictions might find it useful.


Jack, W8TEE






On Thursday, March 5, 2020, 1:48:26 PM EST, Mark Muller <markvmuller@...> wrote:


Excellent Project!

For some reason, the link above did not work in my browser, and perhaps others might have the same problem. Hopefully this link is operational: https://www.qsl.net/py2ohh/trx/loopauto/loopauto.html

There seems to be some improvement to the original work here: https://www.qsl.net/py2ohh/trx/loopauto2/loopauto2.html 

Parabéns Miguel! 73 de N5KNG (Mark Muller)

--
Jack, W8TEE


Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

Wayne Leake
 

 RE soldering stations.
 I use a very old Weller station that uses different tips to change temp.
 Not sure how well that works, bit it has served me well for decades now.
 Same for my Weller soldering guns.
 I can do reasonably well with the soldering station by changing what tips I do have. Bought a few tips last year or before.
 But I hesitate to try soldering smd's as they are used today.
 I'm a bit on the old fashioned side, think 1970s mostly.
 Unlike the bulky irons I used in the 50s. Those can kill many of the parts we use now, though might be great for things that need more heat.
 I have one that my dad said was mine from way back, though the tip is not good looking, and I am not sure how good the power lead is.
 For now I'll stick with my soldering station, and guns for heavier soldering, like some coax connectors.

 Wayne WA2YNE




Re: Very cheap, 24 cent microprocessors. #firmware #i2c

AC9NM - Jerry Ponko <ac9nm.jp@...>
 

Yes, it works very well. If you do have solder bridges, just heat up a solder wick strip over the pins with a soldering iron will wick up the excess solder or using a fine tip soldering pencil just reheat and drag the excess solder away if it's just across two pins. You probable already use one, but nothing beats a temperature controlled soldering pencil with a fine point tip. I bought a Zeny ESD 937D+ on ebay for about $35 two years ago - works great. I used to be a Luddite when it came to soldering pencils/irons because I was out of the hobby electronics scene for a long time until I got my Amateur Extra class license in 2016 and started building stuff again and learned about soldering stations.

Jerry, AC9NM

On 3/5/20 1:19 PM, Tom, wb6b wrote:
On Thu, Mar 5, 2020 at 10:19 AM, AC9NM - Jerry Ponko wrote:
low temperature solder paste
Wow, melts at only 140C. I may have to get some of that. Particularly if I start experimenting with some of the conductive inks that claim to be solderable. 

I definitely won't make any automotive projects, engine compartment or dashboard, projects with this solder paste. 

Tom, wb6b
-- 
Jerry AC9NM


Re: uBitX v6 arrived today - information I found while waiting.

Dean Souleles
 

Mike WA0YCN,

That sounds really interesting. Can you provide a few more details? I took a quick look HubRF page and couldn't quite get oriented.  Which tap board did you purchase and where did you hook in in to the V5?  I'm also curious as to which SDR and software you are using to for the pan display and CAT control.

Thank you,

Dean