Date   
Re: KD8CEC ‘s SWR senser

Gordon Gibby
 

If you build a reflectometer or other system reasonably  well the losses should be extraordinarily low.  Otherwise they would burn up when used with higher power rigs!



On Dec 1, 2019, at 13:15, Joel Caulkins/N6ALT <caulktel@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info Joel

Joel
N6ALT

Re: KD8CEC ‘s SWR senser

 

Thanks for the info Joel

Joel
N6ALT

Re: KD8CEC ‘s SWR senser

Mark Hatch
 

Joel

thanks for this!  Have you measured watts out with and without the bridge?  Read somewhere about a watt penalty of 1 watt when it was in circuit. 


mark

Re: 5/7" Nextion Firmware location

Mark Hatch
 

Can you get me a screen shot. I will look into it. 


mark

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

MVS Sarma
 

You cant have all of 
1. Preset gate more than 100mA drain current,
2. Hi rf drive with q90 collector preset and
3 boosted mic gain with presetbfor modulation level control. 

You may have to reduce at two of the locations. 

All the best 

On Sun, 1 Dec 2019, 9:49 pm harryoliver196410 via Groups.Io, <harryoliver196410=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Still no joy - I had high hope from Raj's suggestion - which makes a lot of sense - unfortunately. the pins and the pots were all in excellent condition (never thought I'd say that ...).
So I'm still blowing fuses.
Any suggestions gratefully received.
Regards
Harry

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

Jerry Gaffke
 

Here's an outline for a step by step procedure to find the fault.
Whether you choose to follow it or not, it should give you some idea of what is going on.

We've all been assuming it's around the IRF510's, since those are the only things that typically pull a few amps.
So disconnect the PA-PWR connector pin in from the power supply, does the fuse still blow when you press PTT?
I assume not.

Now reconnect PA-PWR, with a DVM inline, set to 10 Amps max.  A $2 Harbor Freight DVM will work fine.
Pull up one end of L8,  and also of L9.  So PA-PWR cannot get to the IRF510 drains.
Rotate RV2 and RV3 fully clockwise for 0v at the IRF510 gates (minimum is clockwise, backwards from most pots!)
With 0v on the gates, the IRF510's will not conduct.  They start conducting when there is 3 or 4 volts on the gates.
Apply power and press PTT, does it still blow? 
I assume not.

Should be just a few milliamps going into PA-PWR when you press PTT, I'd guess down around 10ma or so.
A very rough guess, I have not measured it.
But with the DVM at 10 Amps, you should see pretty much zero current on the meter.

Measure the voltage at the IRF 510 gates with PTT pressed, should be zero volts.
(Ideally this would be done with a second DVM, as we will soon need to measure PA-PWR amps again.)
Adjust pots RV2 and RV3, verify that the gate voltage on Q95 and Q94 respectively 
goes from 0v to 5v as you rotate the pot counter clockwise.
Return both pots to 0v, fully clockwise.

Reconnect first L8, press PTT, does it blow?
If not,reconnect L9, press PTT, does it blow?
Since the gate voltages are both still at zero with RV2 and RV3 fully clockwise, the IRF510's are not conducting.
Even though both L8 and L9 are restored, that roughly 10ma of current into PA-PWR should not have risen hardly at all.

Now with PTT pressed, first rotate RV2 counterclockwise very slowly until the PA-PWR current rises to 100ma.
This will happen very suddenly when the gate voltage reaches 3 or 4 volts, so be careful.
If rotating RV2 can bring PA-PWR up to 100ma, then the IRF510 at Q95 is probably ok.

Then rotate RV3 until PA-PWR current increases another 100ma to 200ma total.
If that works, then the IRF510 at Q94 is ok.
Rig is ready to use.

I assume somewhere in that procedure, something went terribly wrong for you.
At exactly what step things when haywire will be a significant clue.

Jerry, KE7ER

Re: KD8CEC ‘s SWR senser

Joel Trenalone
 

For information, here is a sketch of what I did. The home brew Stockton bridge that Ian (CEC) used apparently did not have this problem. 

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Agreed Gordon - Just started doing something along those line now.
Regards
H

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

Gordon Gibby
 

Well, you were going to have to divide up the paths where all the current can go, and interrupt some or all of them until you work out where it is going.    Now is the time to take a look at the schematic


On Dec 1, 2019, at 11:19, harryoliver196410 via Groups.Io <harryoliver196410@...> wrote:

Still no joy - I had high hope from Raj's suggestion - which makes a lot of sense - unfortunately. the pins and the pots were all in excellent condition (never thought I'd say that ...).
So I'm still blowing fuses.
Any suggestions gratefully received.
Regards
Harry

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Still no joy - I had high hope from Raj's suggestion - which makes a lot of sense - unfortunately. the pins and the pots were all in excellent condition (never thought I'd say that ...).
So I'm still blowing fuses.
Any suggestions gratefully received.
Regards
Harry

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Thanks Raj, 
Yes, that makes sense. 
I'll have a crack at it this afternoon. 
Regards
H

Re: V4 TX selective failure #ubitx-help #cat

Evan Hand
 

First off, does it still receive as before?  That helps from the standpoint that the same clocks, mixers and filters are used for both receive and transmit.

The second question is how are the mic and audio from the digital interface connected?

Last question is what test equipment do you have?  For tests beyond static bias measurements, a scope or rf probe is required.   I have traced the signal through the TP's on the board using a 100 MHz scope and the power to the finals removed.  This would help in isolating the stage that is not amplifying, again IF the receiver still works as before.

Really need the answer to the first question before going forward with speculation.  

Take the above with a grain of salt and verify when possible.
73
Evan
AC9TU

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

 

Harry,

I think a pin is broken and still connected. If the ground pin momentarily disconnects then the IRF
will draw high current and blow the fuse. I've seen stranger things!

Raj

At 01-12-19, you wrote:
Hi Raj,
That's interesting and I've seen your post regarding this from a day or two ago.
I can see the logic to what you're saying and I'm definitely going to have a look at them this afternoon - I just think it's strange that this problem would 'suddenly' occur? Or am I being stupid and this is something that would randomly occur?
Thanks again.
Regards
H

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Hi Raj,
That's interesting and I've seen your post regarding this from a day or two ago.
I can see the logic to what you're saying and I'm definitely going to have a look at them this afternoon - I just think it's strange that this problem would 'suddenly' occur?  Or am I being stupid and this is something that would randomly occur?
Thanks again.
Regards
H

Re: Unexpected Blowing of Fuses on Transmit

harryoliver196410@...
 

Hi Evan and thank you,
I was using my 'droopy' dipole, but all testing has since been done into a dummy load - which I have also checked as I have two.
Regards
H

Re: Book TOC

Gordon Gibby
 

Thank you for your comments.

Gordon L Gibby MD MS(EE)
Assoc Prof Univ FL



On Nov 30, 2019, at 22:50, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

Agree. Self-publishing would have done me little to no good in my university teaching as far as rank and tenure went. At the time, those were goals, mainly because I was raising a family. Also, once you have one book published, it gets easier to get the next one published...and so on down the road. I guess that's why I never investigated that route.

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:42:48 PM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


I could also give you a good reason why you should publish through the ARRL and avoid self-publication (as I've seen promoted).

Self-publication is now how some of the most stupid and ignorant nonsense is being peddled to the ignorant these days - leading them to believe and support things that they'd otherwise avoid.  With a reputable publishing agency (Publishing house, ARRL, and University Press varieties), there is at least some vetting and common sense barriers against nonsense.  If the publication is for academic use (and for many that aren't - like technical books) there is a peer review process which contrary to common thinking, isn't if the material is acceptable to the latest 'fad' thinking, but is based on if the science is sound, the logic applicable and accurately used, and the conclusions leading from the science (and also logically derived, based on clear thinking).  Then the peer reviewers have to defend their evaluations of the book - 'I didn't like it" isn't good enough! 

I rather think that the ARRL has something similar.

I've seen some of the craziest ideas get published through self-publishing.  I've helped teach a class focused on teaching students what science is and is not - through showing them pseudoscience and helping them to see the massive errors that usually fills those books and how they aren't what they claim to be.  It made some students (who'd bought into nonsense) very angry, but most of them left the class with a better understanding and appreciation of science.

In the long run, a book (or journal article) published through a reputable firm is worth more than one that is self-published, and is considered to be more valid.  IMO, it gives a good book a much longer 'life'.



On 11/30/19 10:33 AM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
When I got my first full-time teaching job, I bought a Life Membership to the ARRL. I paid $125 in 1970 for it. Probably one of the highest ROI I've ever had!

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:28:20 AM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


Absolutely right about e-books.  You can use them that way if you can do a word search (in doing, for instance, cultural research) and you can cut-and-paste from the text (for writing papers), but for anything more of a technical nature (with schematics, diagrams, and so on) - it's easier to print out the pages in question - defeating the purpose of the e-book.  (It might work if you have the space for a laptop or big tablet - but even then I'd rather have what I need on paper.)  If the e-book requires a specific reader, all the company has to do is change the reader and you're locked out of the very book you purchased.

I think I even still have an e-book purchased several years ago for reference, that the publisher put a 'disable date' in it - I could use it for a couple of years, but suddenly it wouldn't open any more with a message to re-purchase (a $50-$100 book at that).  No warning about time limits before purchase, I should add (from a big name book selling company, whose readers earned a lot of negative comments when their 'updates' disabled features that were regularly used by people).

I've got a couple of the ARRL books I purchased at a hamfest a few years ago - and would love to have yours - but at least for the next few months, wouldn't have the money (can't even afford ARRL dues for the last few years).  Maybe by the time it's in print we won't be quite so tight.

(Having the diagrams and so on available on CD can be a big help, btw.  VERY useful for searches - then go to the hardcopy for usage.  It's especially useful if you provide code or some sort of software!)

Bob

On 11/29/19 11:57 PM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
I've never self-published, mainly because of the difficulty in getting market presence. In this case, McGraw-Hill who published the original Projects book did absolutely nothing to promote the book, so there was no way that I was going to use them again. The ARRL does promote its books, so that was a major consideration. The other factor is that I want this to become a reference book...a springboard for others to enhance, and an ebook just doesn't seem to work in that arena...I wanted a book I could hold in my hand, and that's not cheap.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 7:25:11 PM EST, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Hey Jack, what were the most important factors that made you decide to go with ARRL instead of just publishing on Amazon yourself?


On Nov 29, 2019, at 14:30, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

The book you found is the one I wrote about 5 years ago. Note that it's title is Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio. Because that book did fairly well, and there has been a real advance in some of the microcontrollers, we are not limiting ourselves to the Arduino family of microcontrollers this time. Instead, we are limiting it to those that can be programmed within the Arduino (free) IDE. Therefore, the new book is titled Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. This time we have projects that use touch screen displays and the STM32F1, ESP32, and Teensy 4.0 microcontrollers. We do things in this book that simply were not possible in the first book simply because the resource depth and clock speed wasn't there.

Sorry for the confusion!

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 1:06:28 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

I am confused (my normal state!).  Your email says the book is not yet in publication but
It is already available in paperback and via Kindle.


Arv
_._


On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 10:38 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The book is not in print yet. In fact, it will be published by the ARRL and they say it won't be done until the second quarter of 2020. The title will be Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. Amazon will likely carry it, but we're encouraging people to support the ARRL directly if possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 12:24:15 PM EST, John Faivre <wa9sgd@...> wrote:


What is the title of the new book? I looked on amazon and didn’t see anything with those projects
--
thanks
John Faivre WA9SGD

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

V4 TX selective failure #ubitx-help #cat

Don - KM4UDX
 

Hello wise ones!
My V4 fails to push out RF when audio jack is driving -- voice or digital mode.
- Good news: when CW is key down: full power (yes!  So the back half of the TX chain works just fine.)
- When PPT on mic is pressed, rig goes into TX mode, but no RF output power regardless of mic drive level
- when pressing "tune" in WSJTX or Fldigi  the rig goes into TX mode, but no RF output juice regardless of audio (application) drive  level.  

So the problem seems to be early on in the audio chain?  The physical jack seems fine.

What/how do I do now to debug and fix?. 

Every day I'm off the air I lose WSPRnet ranking, and I feel so alone and isolated in the world. A quiet  uBITX is a sad uBITX...

Thank you thank you...

Re: 5/7" Nextion Firmware location

Justin Phillips K5AXL
 

Has anyone fixed the manual frequency screen 0 being labeled as 9 ? I tried to fix mine, but I haven't figured out much with Nextion Editor.

Re: Book TOC

Jack, W8TEE
 

Agree. Self-publishing would have done me little to no good in my university teaching as far as rank and tenure went. At the time, those were goals, mainly because I was raising a family. Also, once you have one book published, it gets easier to get the next one published...and so on down the road. I guess that's why I never investigated that route.

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:42:48 PM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


I could also give you a good reason why you should publish through the ARRL and avoid self-publication (as I've seen promoted).

Self-publication is now how some of the most stupid and ignorant nonsense is being peddled to the ignorant these days - leading them to believe and support things that they'd otherwise avoid.  With a reputable publishing agency (Publishing house, ARRL, and University Press varieties), there is at least some vetting and common sense barriers against nonsense.  If the publication is for academic use (and for many that aren't - like technical books) there is a peer review process which contrary to common thinking, isn't if the material is acceptable to the latest 'fad' thinking, but is based on if the science is sound, the logic applicable and accurately used, and the conclusions leading from the science (and also logically derived, based on clear thinking).  Then the peer reviewers have to defend their evaluations of the book - 'I didn't like it" isn't good enough! 

I rather think that the ARRL has something similar.

I've seen some of the craziest ideas get published through self-publishing.  I've helped teach a class focused on teaching students what science is and is not - through showing them pseudoscience and helping them to see the massive errors that usually fills those books and how they aren't what they claim to be.  It made some students (who'd bought into nonsense) very angry, but most of them left the class with a better understanding and appreciation of science.

In the long run, a book (or journal article) published through a reputable firm is worth more than one that is self-published, and is considered to be more valid.  IMO, it gives a good book a much longer 'life'.



On 11/30/19 10:33 AM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
When I got my first full-time teaching job, I bought a Life Membership to the ARRL. I paid $125 in 1970 for it. Probably one of the highest ROI I've ever had!

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:28:20 AM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


Absolutely right about e-books.  You can use them that way if you can do a word search (in doing, for instance, cultural research) and you can cut-and-paste from the text (for writing papers), but for anything more of a technical nature (with schematics, diagrams, and so on) - it's easier to print out the pages in question - defeating the purpose of the e-book.  (It might work if you have the space for a laptop or big tablet - but even then I'd rather have what I need on paper.)  If the e-book requires a specific reader, all the company has to do is change the reader and you're locked out of the very book you purchased.

I think I even still have an e-book purchased several years ago for reference, that the publisher put a 'disable date' in it - I could use it for a couple of years, but suddenly it wouldn't open any more with a message to re-purchase (a $50-$100 book at that).  No warning about time limits before purchase, I should add (from a big name book selling company, whose readers earned a lot of negative comments when their 'updates' disabled features that were regularly used by people).

I've got a couple of the ARRL books I purchased at a hamfest a few years ago - and would love to have yours - but at least for the next few months, wouldn't have the money (can't even afford ARRL dues for the last few years).  Maybe by the time it's in print we won't be quite so tight.

(Having the diagrams and so on available on CD can be a big help, btw.  VERY useful for searches - then go to the hardcopy for usage.  It's especially useful if you provide code or some sort of software!)

Bob

On 11/29/19 11:57 PM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
I've never self-published, mainly because of the difficulty in getting market presence. In this case, McGraw-Hill who published the original Projects book did absolutely nothing to promote the book, so there was no way that I was going to use them again. The ARRL does promote its books, so that was a major consideration. The other factor is that I want this to become a reference book...a springboard for others to enhance, and an ebook just doesn't seem to work in that arena...I wanted a book I could hold in my hand, and that's not cheap.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 7:25:11 PM EST, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Hey Jack, what were the most important factors that made you decide to go with ARRL instead of just publishing on Amazon yourself?


On Nov 29, 2019, at 14:30, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

The book you found is the one I wrote about 5 years ago. Note that it's title is Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio. Because that book did fairly well, and there has been a real advance in some of the microcontrollers, we are not limiting ourselves to the Arduino family of microcontrollers this time. Instead, we are limiting it to those that can be programmed within the Arduino (free) IDE. Therefore, the new book is titled Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. This time we have projects that use touch screen displays and the STM32F1, ESP32, and Teensy 4.0 microcontrollers. We do things in this book that simply were not possible in the first book simply because the resource depth and clock speed wasn't there.

Sorry for the confusion!

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 1:06:28 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

I am confused (my normal state!).  Your email says the book is not yet in publication but
It is already available in paperback and via Kindle.


Arv
_._


On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 10:38 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The book is not in print yet. In fact, it will be published by the ARRL and they say it won't be done until the second quarter of 2020. The title will be Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. Amazon will likely carry it, but we're encouraging people to support the ARRL directly if possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 12:24:15 PM EST, John Faivre <wa9sgd@...> wrote:


What is the title of the new book? I looked on amazon and didn’t see anything with those projects
--
thanks
John Faivre WA9SGD

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

Re: Book TOC

Robert D. Bowers
 

I could also give you a good reason why you should publish through the ARRL and avoid self-publication (as I've seen promoted).

Self-publication is now how some of the most stupid and ignorant nonsense is being peddled to the ignorant these days - leading them to believe and support things that they'd otherwise avoid.  With a reputable publishing agency (Publishing house, ARRL, and University Press varieties), there is at least some vetting and common sense barriers against nonsense.  If the publication is for academic use (and for many that aren't - like technical books) there is a peer review process which contrary to common thinking, isn't if the material is acceptable to the latest 'fad' thinking, but is based on if the science is sound, the logic applicable and accurately used, and the conclusions leading from the science (and also logically derived, based on clear thinking).  Then the peer reviewers have to defend their evaluations of the book - 'I didn't like it" isn't good enough! 

I rather think that the ARRL has something similar.

I've seen some of the craziest ideas get published through self-publishing.  I've helped teach a class focused on teaching students what science is and is not - through showing them pseudoscience and helping them to see the massive errors that usually fills those books and how they aren't what they claim to be.  It made some students (who'd bought into nonsense) very angry, but most of them left the class with a better understanding and appreciation of science.

In the long run, a book (or journal article) published through a reputable firm is worth more than one that is self-published, and is considered to be more valid.  IMO, it gives a good book a much longer 'life'.



On 11/30/19 10:33 AM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
When I got my first full-time teaching job, I bought a Life Membership to the ARRL. I paid $125 in 1970 for it. Probably one of the highest ROI I've ever had!

Jack, W8TEE

On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 10:28:20 AM EST, Robert D. Bowers <n4fbz@...> wrote:


Absolutely right about e-books.  You can use them that way if you can do a word search (in doing, for instance, cultural research) and you can cut-and-paste from the text (for writing papers), but for anything more of a technical nature (with schematics, diagrams, and so on) - it's easier to print out the pages in question - defeating the purpose of the e-book.  (It might work if you have the space for a laptop or big tablet - but even then I'd rather have what I need on paper.)  If the e-book requires a specific reader, all the company has to do is change the reader and you're locked out of the very book you purchased.

I think I even still have an e-book purchased several years ago for reference, that the publisher put a 'disable date' in it - I could use it for a couple of years, but suddenly it wouldn't open any more with a message to re-purchase (a $50-$100 book at that).  No warning about time limits before purchase, I should add (from a big name book selling company, whose readers earned a lot of negative comments when their 'updates' disabled features that were regularly used by people).

I've got a couple of the ARRL books I purchased at a hamfest a few years ago - and would love to have yours - but at least for the next few months, wouldn't have the money (can't even afford ARRL dues for the last few years).  Maybe by the time it's in print we won't be quite so tight.

(Having the diagrams and so on available on CD can be a big help, btw.  VERY useful for searches - then go to the hardcopy for usage.  It's especially useful if you provide code or some sort of software!)

Bob

On 11/29/19 11:57 PM, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io wrote:
I've never self-published, mainly because of the difficulty in getting market presence. In this case, McGraw-Hill who published the original Projects book did absolutely nothing to promote the book, so there was no way that I was going to use them again. The ARRL does promote its books, so that was a major consideration. The other factor is that I want this to become a reference book...a springboard for others to enhance, and an ebook just doesn't seem to work in that arena...I wanted a book I could hold in my hand, and that's not cheap.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 7:25:11 PM EST, Gordon Gibby <docvacuumtubes@...> wrote:


Hey Jack, what were the most important factors that made you decide to go with ARRL instead of just publishing on Amazon yourself?


On Nov 29, 2019, at 14:30, Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

The book you found is the one I wrote about 5 years ago. Note that it's title is Arduino Projects for Amateur Radio. Because that book did fairly well, and there has been a real advance in some of the microcontrollers, we are not limiting ourselves to the Arduino family of microcontrollers this time. Instead, we are limiting it to those that can be programmed within the Arduino (free) IDE. Therefore, the new book is titled Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. This time we have projects that use touch screen displays and the STM32F1, ESP32, and Teensy 4.0 microcontrollers. We do things in this book that simply were not possible in the first book simply because the resource depth and clock speed wasn't there.

Sorry for the confusion!

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 1:06:28 PM EST, Arv Evans <arvid.evans@...> wrote:


Jack

I am confused (my normal state!).  Your email says the book is not yet in publication but
It is already available in paperback and via Kindle.


Arv
_._


On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 10:38 AM Jack, W8TEE via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The book is not in print yet. In fact, it will be published by the ARRL and they say it won't be done until the second quarter of 2020. The title will be Microcontroller Projects for Amateur Radio. Amazon will likely carry it, but we're encouraging people to support the ARRL directly if possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 12:24:15 PM EST, John Faivre <wa9sgd@...> wrote:


What is the title of the new book? I looked on amazon and didn’t see anything with those projects
--
thanks
John Faivre WA9SGD

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE

--
Jack, W8TEE