Date   

Re: Coding styles

 

Wow….does that bring back similar memories of my first computer experience….on the F106 Delta Dart in USAF….the compute interface was what you see there….in the middle of that front panel……a row of toggle switches….but not puny ones like that….mil spec….and nice large amber 28 volt lamps…..and to make it easy, there was the line above each group of 3 switches and lamps to indicate the octal address…..

After an aircraft landed you would be tasked to go run routines to pull flight data and also used to run maintenance routines or to really have fun, hook up to hydraulics, ground power, a refer unit to keep everything cool (move the cockpit switch to just a little open, and in FLA lower the cockpit to almost close) and then run a routine that would have the speed tapes and the altimeter run up to about 1.5 and 57k, open the bay door, lower the armament rails, simulate a couple ir and radar missiles and toss a air to air nuke, and plane would jump as those pneumatic supersonic rated doors cycled, along with the big jump when the vertical tail control surface slammed back and forth as you simulated breaking the sound barrier…..yeah….motion video games before they ever existed….while watching the best weather radar and every plane in the sky, and tracking your buddy on the flight line by the heat of his cigarette….and if anyone had any magic cubes for their instamatic….it was full day.

Classic computer interface.

Craig
KM4YEC


On May 9, 2018, at 10:36 AM, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:

OMG! I built one of the Altair's for a friend and had to program it to test whether I had built it correctly. For those who don't know, those switches are for setting the binary bits for each byte of the program. When you had that byte set, you hit a "Deposit" switch which moved that byte into RAM. You could tell early Altair programmers by the "binary blisters" on their index finger!

Jack, W8TEE





I saw somewhere online that someone has an Arduino based version of it; even looks the same!

-- 
John - WA2FZW


Re: Antenna Analyzer

Tom, wb6b
 

I'm using a "Ham It Up" up converter and it includes a noise source as part of the package. However, I like the one you linked to as it doesn't seem need an additional directional coupler or hacked together resistive bridge. 

http://www.nooelec.com/store/ham-it-up-plus.html

By the way, I use the Ham-It-Up converter with a SDR dongle running with OpenWebRX on a Raspberry Pi. It was surprising to me that the SDR dongle with the up converter seems to be a better receiver than the uBITX. Although, I'd imagine the uBITX may do better in RF overload conditions like Field Day.

https://sdr.hu/openwebrx

Tom, wb6b


Re: New ideas for the Audio TX/RX pop and PA output stage improvements on ubitx.net

Jerry Gaffke
 

The Bitx40 did that, removes power to the LM386 when transmitting.
It still has a nasty pop.  Killing the pop is more difficult than it first looks.

I've heard but not tried that reducing or even completely removing the big
power supply filter caps at C75 and C52 (for the TDA2822 and audio preamp at Q70)
can cut the pop considerably. 

The VA7AT 15 piece pop fix that Kees is kitting up is a bit more complicated
but apparently the best fix thus far. 

Plenty of other ways to choose from:  http://ubitx.net/fix-audio-pop/

Jerry


On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 11:25 am, Joe Puma wrote:
This is probably a question for Jerry or the likes.  Could this method help the TX/RX pop? Pull the power to the TDA chip?   


Re: uBitx distorted transmit audio

iz oos
 

I always check my tx audio as I use the Ubitx as tx and I often receive with a Softrock SDR. If you have an sdr you can transmit into a dummy load a check your tx audio with the sdr with the antenna input disconnected. You can use an ordinary receiver ad well but you will not see the spectrum on the PC. My unit was almost perfectly aligned, just 100hz off frequency. 2khz seem a lot and maybe you can fix it with the menus. As for reported audio by others I would not care. My unit cuts very well the basses and has a good modulation from 500 to 2800hz. Some people say I am off frequency because they wish to hear more basses. Others say it is perfect. I say I like it as I monitor it at all times. You have to evaluate yourself your modulation. Don't trust what others say, they have all different ears... So check with another receiver your transmitted audio. It could be just fine.


Il 09/mag/2018 19:04, <dwithers@...> ha scritto:

I received my ubitx in early Jan after ordering it in mid December. I have been on and off with making progress with it, but have been following this forum since then. This board has a problem and I was hoping to see someone else come up with it too. The software rev. is XX at bootup. So I have been hesitant about changing anything until I consulted with the group. It works fine on TX and RX on CW.

On SSB (l or u) the voice audio is severely distorted. When others hear me on the air or when I listen on a local receiver you can tell what the words are (callsigns) but they are distorted. I have tried several different mic elements. I have injected audio from a sig gen into the mic and also directly on the input pin. The rig will pass 300 – 3K tones fine. The output of the audio/mic amp looks fine too. The tones sound good OTA.

When I look at the power out on a dummy load it drops off dramatically above 3Khz. I think the human voice has tones above 3K. The second thing seems to be that the rig is about 2Khz off frequency from the dial. When checking into a local net I’m reported low as I recall.

I hope there is a simpler solution that diddling with the frequency parameters. Oh, the receiver receives fine on the designated frequency.

Any ideas?

Dan Withers – WM7W

I’m old too. I was hand booting a DG Nova 1200 before reset-program load was implemented. I couldn’t lift a Wangco 5 mb disc drive either.


Re: Removing solder resist.

Lee
 

I use a abrasive wheel on my dremel at a slow speed.  It is about the size of a nickel  and looks like rubber with fine abrasive dust molded in.   I have even cut them in half and rubbed the trace by hand.   Leaves nice clean shinny copper exposed.


Re: New ideas for the Audio TX/RX pop and PA output stage improvements on ubitx.net

Joe Puma
 

I haven’t been follow the tx/rx pop yet and I don’t know if any of this is being done yet in the circuitry of the ubitx but I’ve been playing around with HT’s making a AllStar node and learned that on the Baofeng and maybe other radios there is no power going to the audio chip when tx’ing or if the squelch is closed. 

This is probably a question for Jerry or the likes.  Could this method help the TX/RX pop? Pull the power to the TDA chip?  Now maybe it might not matter or make a difference due to timing and build up voltage or current on the circuit. I’m out of my league here but was thinking out loud. 

Joe
KD2NFC 



On May 9, 2018, at 6:36 AM, victorladeira@... wrote:

   Can these mods be used with the stock irf510's? Will it improve the output and fix the audio pop. Still waiting for my  RDF16HHF1. I have the 2:3 wound and ready to go!

                                Thanks! Victor AL3K


Re: Removing solder resist.

MAX <max@...>
 

Now that’s a good thought, both parts of it.

 

Regards.

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io [mailto:BITX20@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Cooper
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2018 12:55 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

...    Try a couple of the missus’s nail/emery boards......      ( don’t tell her I told you!!!   ) G4ZWI

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: MAX
Sent: 09 May 2018 18:53
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

I didn’t mean flux.  I meant the green material that coats most of a PC board.  Some of it usually has to be removed to modify a board.

 

Regards.

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io [mailto:BITX20@groups.io] On Behalf Of ajparent1/KB1GMX
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2018 12:43 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

I presume you means the colored overcoating.  IF so its an epoxy material and very tough
so abrasion/scraping is the near only means as anything aggressive enough to soften it 
will likely damage other parts.

If your removing flux residue, Isopropanol-91% cheap and any pharmacy has it.
Do not use near fire or flame.

Allison

 

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Coding styles

ajparent1/KB1GMX <kb1gmx@...>
 

Fuse-link proms predates the Altair!  It was the first effort to get off the front panel
using two 32x4 parts as 32 bytes was enough[barely] to run a binary loader.

Before that I'd use them to build simple state machine logic.

The goal was turnkey startup.  To make that happen a IO board was created and
a tape recorder highly modified to create a saturation read/write with FM encoding.
Once the bugs were out I could load files at about 2.5kbytes a second. 

The NS* Disk was a huge step up.  However it was in the Altair chassis 
and when it would crash [its favorite habit] it would munge the disk. That lead to
the NS* Horizon.   Soon after a 765 FDC and a bit of effort lead to a better floppy
system 360K per 5.25" drive which was then huge and 1MB for a SA850 8".  By
1980 I had a Teltek controller and a ST506.  Having 5MB and CP/M was finally
a time when space {enough of it} was not an issue.   That machine lives now 
with two 31mb Quantum D540, Z80 at 10mhz, 256K of mapped ram, and a highly
modded version of CP/M I never let out (CP/M2.2 that could multiprocess,
but not MPM) as it was a bit too weird but ran everything CP/M.  At that time
I had 4 machines running CP/M only two with disks as they could "network"
using high speed (19200 baud) serial bus between each other and share files.
The goal wa capability of the PDP-8 running TSS-8 (timesharing),  PDP11
RSTS and VAX/VMS.

Terminals the first non TTY was a Ct1024 then VDM-1.  Those were upstaged by
a H19 with modified software (emulated a Vt52 properly).  Later real VT100,
Vt180, VT320s.

Along the way TinyC and Ron Cains SmallC were part of the library along with
BDS C.   My favorite editor was Vedit as it was Teco compatible and was also
full screen mode that understood the Vt100 and VT320 cursor keys..

I kept a lot of the old hardware. over the years added more.  Over the years
there were two constants Computers and Communications.

Allison


Re: Removing solder resist.

MAX <max@...>
 

In the past I have bought a quart can of acetone at a hardware store.  That’s what I’ll do if the government hasn’t band the sale of it.  Wow.  I just looked in my chemical storage area and found I still have half that can left.  I know the precautions. 

 

Regards.

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io [mailto:BITX20@groups.io] On Behalf Of Doug W
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2018 12:48 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:38 am, MAX wrote:

Acetone sounds better than alcohol.

If you can't get to a hardware store most drugstores carry nail polish remover that is 100% acetone.  Look for the clear stuff without dyes or scents.  Just make sure you treat it like the nastiness it is and don't blame me if you get strange looks from the cashier.
 
--
www.bitxmap.com


Re: Removing solder resist.

Doug W
 

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:53 am, Michael Hagen wrote:
acetone is pretty high powered for me, might take other things off the PCB!
Just to clarify, I am not saying acetone is or is not the right solution to the OP's problem.  I am just sharing a way to find it that might be more convenient.
 
--
www.bitxmap.com


Re: Removing solder resist.

g4zwim@...
 

...    Try a couple of the missus’s nail/emery boards......      ( don’t tell her I told you!!!   ) G4ZWI

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: MAX
Sent: 09 May 2018 18:53
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

I didn’t mean flux.  I meant the green material that coats most of a PC board.  Some of it usually has to be removed to modify a board.

 

Regards.

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io [mailto:BITX20@groups.io] On Behalf Of ajparent1/KB1GMX
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2018 12:43 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

I presume you means the colored overcoating.  IF so its an epoxy material and very tough
so abrasion/scraping is the near only means as anything aggressive enough to soften it 
will likely damage other parts.

If your removing flux residue, Isopropanol-91% cheap and any pharmacy has it.
Do not use near fire or flame.

Allison

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Removing solder resist.

Michael Hagen
 

99Cent store by my QTH has the clear nail remover in a small bottle (acetone), you don't have buy a pt or quart that way.

I bought a gal of acholol to use for flux removal, acetone is pretty high powered for me, might take other things off the PCB!

Mike


On 5/9/2018 10:48 AM, Doug W wrote:
On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:38 am, MAX wrote:
Acetone sounds better than alcohol.
If you can't get to a hardware store most drugstores carry nail polish remover that is 100% acetone.  Look for the clear stuff without dyes or scents.  Just make sure you treat it like the nastiness it is and don't blame me if you get strange looks from the cashier.
 
--
www.bitxmap.com

-- 
Mike Hagen, WA6ISP
10917 Bryant Street
Yucaipa, Ca. 92399
(909) 918-0058
PayPal ID  "MotDog@..."
Mike@...


Re: Removing solder resist.

MAX <max@...>
 

I didn’t mean flux.  I meant the green material that coats most of a PC board.  Some of it usually has to be removed to modify a board.

 

Regards.

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: BITX20@groups.io [mailto:BITX20@groups.io] On Behalf Of ajparent1/KB1GMX
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2018 12:43 PM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.

 

I presume you means the colored overcoating.  IF so its an epoxy material and very tough
so abrasion/scraping is the near only means as anything aggressive enough to soften it 
will likely damage other parts.

If your removing flux residue, Isopropanol-91% cheap and any pharmacy has it.
Do not use near fire or flame.

Allison


Re: Coding styles

Jerry Gaffke
 

Well, close.
Tracy Kidder documented the soul of the Data General Eclipse MV/8000. 


On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:43 am, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
If you ever try to sell that Nova on ebay, include a copy of Tracy Kidder's "Soul of the New Machine"


Re: Case Help

n2tmc@...
 

I guess that was my concern about having it unshielded. I see where some builders put aluminium foil tape inside the cases. 


Re: Removing solder resist.

Doug W
 

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:38 am, MAX wrote:
Acetone sounds better than alcohol.
If you can't get to a hardware store most drugstores carry nail polish remover that is 100% acetone.  Look for the clear stuff without dyes or scents.  Just make sure you treat it like the nastiness it is and don't blame me if you get strange looks from the cashier.
 
--
www.bitxmap.com


Re: Removing solder resist.

Thomas Sharka
 



If one of these brush pens doesn't do it, find out who the manufacturer is and let us know. The fiberglass brush is best for most resist coatings.

Sent from Yahoo Mail. Get the app


On Wednesday, May 9, 2018 1:38 PM, MAX <max@...> wrote:


Thank you.  Acetone sounds better than alcohol.
 
Regards.
 
Max K 4 O D S.
 
I've Never Lost the Wonder.
 
 
 
From: BITX20@groups.io [mailto:BITX20@groups.io] On Behalf Of K9HZ
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2018 8:38 AM
To: BITX20@groups.io
Subject: Re: [BITX20] Removing solder resist.
 
Well not all solder masks are created the same. That said acetone or toluene will work on some, water and orange oil in others.  Some is polymer based and must be scraped off. 
 
Dr. William J. Schmidt - K9HZ J68HZ 8P6HK ZF2HZ PJ4/K9HZ VP5/K9HZ PJ2/K9HZ
 
Owner - Operator
Big Signal Ranch – K9ZC
Staunton, Illinois
 
Owner – Operator
Villa Grand Piton - J68HZ
Soufriere, St. Lucia W.I.
 
email:  bill@...
 

On May 9, 2018, at 6:56 AM, MAX <max@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a good trick for removing solder resist from a PC board?  Scraping at it with an exacto knife seems a bit clumsy and I have never been able to leave a neat looking exposed copper area behind.

Regards.

Max K 4 O D S.

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/






Re: SWR

K9HZ <bill@...>
 

Ohhhh see.  With those LF398Ns you can sample the diodes or AD8307(s) and still use the arduino A/D.  Go get and convert the values when you want because you saved them when you wanted/needed to. 


Dr. William J. Schmidt - K9HZ J68HZ 8P6HK ZF2HZ PJ4/K9HZ VP5/K9HZ PJ2/K9HZ

 

Owner - Operator

Big Signal Ranch – K9ZC

Staunton, Illinois

 

Owner – Operator

Villa Grand Piton - J68HZ

Soufriere, St. Lucia W.I.

Rent it: www.VillaGrandPiton.com


email:  bill@...

 


On May 9, 2018, at 8:49 AM, Kees T <windy10605@...> wrote:

I think Jack, W8TEE, is waiting for FDIM to tell us all the correct way to solve the problem.

Just found an article from January 2011 QST which uses LF398N parts and a PIC16F876A by Bill Kaune, W7IEQ.

73 Kees K5BCQ


Re: Coding styles

Jerry Gaffke
 

If you ever try to sell that Nova on ebay, include a copy of Tracy Kidder's "Soul of the New Machine"
to make sure they get the connection.  Should increase the bid price by 10x or so.

On my first job out of college they made the same leap of faith in MMI,
basing their boards on them new fangled PAL thingies.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:21 am, Paul Wilson wrote:

Never programmed an Altair but I spent plenty of time programming PDP-11s by toggling the switches on the front panel and I have a Data General Nova in the basement that may or may not still be in working condition (real core memory too) which is programmed that way as well.

Paul, VA6PW


Re: Coding styles

Doug W
 

I'm probably opening the door to get labeled as a young punk who had it easy but my earliest computer memory is my dad bringing home a Commodore VIC-20 and waiting for the latest magazine or newsletter to show up with type in games.
--
www.bitxmap.com