Date   
Re: Tinny sounding electric miss on uBitx

Mike Lichtman
 

Bill and the group,
Thank you. I did the BFO adjustment and what a great improvement. I am located in Glendale, CA just north of Los Angeles near the Rose Bowl. My
first contact was to Tucson, AZ and then to Utah. My signal reports were 5-5 and 5-9 with good audio. And that’s with mediocre propagation.
Made my day. Now I am waiting for the case I ordered to arrive. One mod I am making is a panel mounted pushbutton that parallels the key jack to have a signal
for tuning when using SSB. I generally have been putting out about 9 watts on 40m. 73 Mike KF6KXG

Re: wrong frequency after software change. #ubitx

Ian Lee
 

all
first. Congratulations on solving problem.

I have seen this problem very simple. And the correct answer to that question was Mike's answer.
The cause was the wrong eeprom value. ok?

I saw an important point in the questioner's question.
First question : "After uploading the software from Ian Lee I was really happy how it behaved but that didn't last.
I uploaded another version (unfortunately I don't remember which one)"
The important thing is "unfortunately I do not remember which one".
Because I have had this experience some times.
I have experienced a situation similar to the questioner several times a long time ago.
Especially, I experienced it more often when I connected several ICE (ice in circuit emulator), Downloader, etc. to one computer.

So I understood the questioner's situation. And I did not ask anymore about it anymore.
I just wanted the questioner's uBITX to come back to normal.
Of course I had my own guess.
'Perhaps the questioner uploaded uBITX firmware is not the firmware for uBITX?'

Anyway, I agreed with Mike and suggested two ways to restore the eeprom.He simply need to initialize the wrong eeprom.

I did not know about Arduino, but he had the ability to initialize eeprom on sketch, so he did a great job. he completely solved the problem himself.
And the issue of the lifetime of the eeprom was a very good debate a few days ago. please search.
And I like to talk about these issues. I want to have a discussion at any time.

In addition, most uBITX firmware protects the Calibration items used by the original source.
In particular, i was an in-depth dialogue with Ron about this and we agreed not to use the author's realms and extra realms. In this way, uBITX firmware is guaranteed to be compatible with each other.
So I guess the questioner uploaded firmware would not be uBITX firmware. Most of the uBITX firmware sources I've seen protect the 0 ~ 20 addresses with Master Calibration and BFO Calibration.

And I sincerely hope that many bugs will be found in my firmware.Please feel free to report any bugs you have found and any improvements you have made.
I have deployed 1.0 and the bugs reported so far are just one. It was that when IAMBIC key was selected, RX switch command of CAT protocol was not heard well.
It was corrected within an hour of reporting and soon changed to 1.01.

There are no bug reports since then. So I am lonely. When I have a bug report I feel that I am not alone.
Even from the beta testers who are with me, they are quiet nowadays.

All the history I editing codes are available in github.

Ian KD8CEC











2018-02-12 5:59 GMT+09:00 at91r40008 <yvon@...>:

Ron,

it is just one of the Arduino examples.
Where is your software located/named?
--
73, Yvon NU6I



--
Best 73
KD8CEC / Ph.D ian lee
kd8cec@...
www.hamskey.com (my blog)

Raduino Replacemnt, COMING SOON!

Nick VK4PP
 

Hi Group.

I am working on a simple "Open source" Raduino replacment board: see here:
https://easyeda.com/nikpolini/Raduino-1b3e0cb579154514ad2e014b83346b58

It will use the Adafuit Clock board: https://www.adafruit.com/product/2045
So will run all devices at 5v.
I hope to have pinouts and dimension exactly the same as the origional so it can be used as a direct drop-in replacement. Or modified for i2c display and other GPIO mods...
Should be cheap (.50c a board, $3 nano, $8 Si5153 board plus a 7805 regulator and a few other bits... I'll try make it both SMD and TH for the capacitors and resistors...
So you can build a cheap easy <$20 Raduino replacment....

Constructive comments and thoughs welcome.

73. Nik
VK4PLN

Raduino v2.04 released #bitx40

Allard PE1NWL
 

Hi,
I've just released Raduino v2.04 for BitX40, download it from https://github.com/amunters/bitx40-raduino-v2

New in this release:

  • renamed "CLARIFIER" to "Passband Tuning (PBT)" as this seems a more appropriate name for this function
  • improved the code so that the si5351 does not keep receiving tuning updates once the frequency has reached the upper or lower limit
Happy BitX-ing!

73 Allard PE1NWL

Re: uBITX woes, feeling disheartened. #ubitx

rlawson695@...
 

make that K1 Rec. pin3=0 volts   sorry   73's de AC8XZ

Re: BITX QSO Afternoon/Night, Sunday, February 11, 3PM/7PM Local Time, 7277 kHz in North America, 7177 kHz elsewhere

John P
 

Called CQ for a half hour this evening. Nothing but noise! 
--
John - WA2FZW

Re: Tinny sounding electric miss on uBitx

Joe
 

I experienced similar tinny mic audio issues.  I had not realized the BFO affects both. 
After figuring out the BFO tx /rx relationship, I now just transmit and listen to my audio when transmitting.
While transmitting, I then tune the BFO 1199600 up or down until I hear the sound quality I desire.

Since I use the TFT Touch Control  display, the BFO is fully tune able from the touch display

Joe
VE1BWV



On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 7:41 PM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke@...> wrote:
<  would be between 100 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny

Should be:
 >  would be between 1000 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 03:39 pm, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
would be between 100 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny.


Re: What firmware do you suggest for uBitx???

Michael Shreeve
 

Jack, I agree, the rig should be working before you do any software "mods".

If your writing your own, then, of course, change one thing at a time.

If you like most of us, not writing your own, then the following things seem to be the only important things about changes.
One, make sure the program your uploading has been tested using your hardware platform. If you've made changes to your hardware, you may be stuck with the software that came with the hardware , especially if it involves a new type of display or changing the display to I2C serial. You must be a programmer make any changes from that point on. Or, your going to be at the mercy of that programmer. But, with standard hardware, that's not a problem. You can do what you want. 

Well tested software is very important.

One thing that came up is that the eeprom in the Arduino may keep certain values from whatever version you had before. One guy offered a "eeprom wipe" , but it wasn't quite for the Nano, as it had been written for a larger Arduino. I'm fairly certain some may include a feature into new software just to make sure that isn't a problem.  Some are writing for a "change" rather than an entire new system, and I think that's how this is happening. If your worried about that, you should probably wait for things to get Ironed out. I'm so excited by the new features that I have already made some huge changes.
                                                       

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 8:57 AM, Jack Purdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum@...> wrote:
I think it's always a good idea to get the rig working with the "standard" software. Then look at a single mod you'd like to make. Making two or more mods at once complicates things if they don't work when you're done. Doing one at a time makes it easier to "undo" the mod and see what went wrong.

Jack, W8TEE



From: Paul Schumacher via Groups.Io <wnpauls=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 11:44 AM
Subject: [BITX20] What firmware do you suggest for uBitx???

Is the factory default recommended? 

Or one of the updates?

thanks,

Paul K0ZYV





--
Michael Shreeve N6GRG
15901 Cloverdale Road
Anderson, CA 96007
530-410-8678
"Don't worry about a thing, 'Cause every little thing gonna be all right!" -Bob Marley



Re: Blown by nearby transceiver #bitx40help

Jerry Gaffke
 

Something like an airwound solenoid inductor will indeed pick up nearby RF
through magnetic coupling, perhaps enough to burn traces.   

I'd be surprised if a toroid could do that, at least with the fields we normally deal with.
A toroid has a circular field confined mostly to the donut shaped core, a magnetic field
from a nearby device would have little effect because coupling into one side of the toroid
would be nearly balanced out by coupling into the opposite side of the toroid.
On that opposite side, the toroid's internal magnetic field is pointed in the opposite direction,
but the relatively large field from your nearby equipment would be uniform across the toroid.

So does not seem likely to me.
But then I am often surprised.

Jerry


On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 02:38 pm, Joe Puma wrote:
Hey Jerry, I’ve had strange things like his happen to me with other equipment when transmitting even with a little Power like the bitx40.  I’ve zapped the inductors on a SpyVerter and SV1AFN upconverter, fried them completely, the spyverter has board damage too but nothing else, no other components. Heck, I’ve fried the SV1AFN a few times with my 100w radio and finally beyond repair because it killed the mixer and too many things I didn’t have parts for.  My SDR Antenna is near my long wire TX antenna I use for my Yaesu and the bitx40 when I had it. 
 
It happened mostly when I was tuning up, actually I think only when tuning up. And especially on 160. I’ve watched an inductor burn up right before my eyes when the tuner was chattering. Must of been throwing high voltages everywhere. RF sure is amazing lol. I’m still learning. 
 
 

Re: Bitx40 - receiver works great, but do not transmit #bitx40help

Joe Puma
 

Hmmm I didnt know this lol. I wanted to measure something with a RF millivolt meter that measures 8v?   So I saw that it can output a signal greater then 8v so I thought it had the range I was looking for. 

And now that you mention it I was reading my technical manual incorrectly and the voltage I was looking for is actually DC volts

image1.jpeg

I guess I will order the one that you linked me to because It’s the RF millivolts that I want to check on my radio at various test point Locations. 

And I guess I can check those DC voltages myself with my DVM now :) 

Joe
KD2NFC 


On Feb 11, 2018, at 6:28 PM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke@...> wrote:

That's looks great if you want a high impedance probe for your oscilloscope or spectrum analyzer.
RF goes in, bigger RF at the same frequency goes out

But that is not a suitable RF probe for a DVM, where you want RF in, and a DC voltage out
that represents how strong the RF in was.

There are some similar AD8307 probes available on Ebay that I previously pointed to 
in response to one of your posts, they look much more suitable though I have not tried them.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 02:45 pm, Joe Puma wrote:
I’m waiting for this to come in the mail: RF Active Probe 0.1-1.5GHz  analyzer oscilloscope

Re: Tinny sounding electric miss on uBitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

<  would be between 100 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny

Should be:
 >  would be between 1000 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny


On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 03:39 pm, Jerry Gaffke wrote:
would be between 100 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny.

Re: Tinny sounding electric miss on uBitx

Jerry Gaffke
 

Transmit and receive are symetrical on the uBitx and Bitx40, uses the same bfo and IF filter.
Should have about the same audio characteristics on transmit as receive.

Assume the crystal filter has a passband from 11.998 to 11.996, the BFO is at 11.9955mhz
When transmitting, audio from the mike amp of 0 hz is at 11.9955mhz, audio that was 500hz is now 11.996mhz
and audio that was at 2500hz is now mixed with the BFO to create a signal at 11.998mhz.
Only stuff between 11.996 and 11.998 mhz will make it through the crystal filter.
So any audio from the mike between 500 and 2500 hz goes into the IF amp at frequencies between 11.996 and 11.998mhz.

On receive, the math is exactly the same.  The crystal filter only accepts incoming RF between 11.996 and 11.998,
when that RF is combined with our 11.9955mhz BFO we wind up with audio between 500 and 2500 hz.

Now if the BFO was at 11.9950 mhz but everything else was the same, the audio on transmit and receive
would be between 100 and 3000 hz, and perhaps sound a bit tinny.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 02:49 pm, John Backo wrote:
Oops -- I noticed you said "tinny when
monitoring in another receiver..."

That would rule out the BFO in YOUR receiver.

It could be the voice quality of your mic amplifier.
There have been various solutions posited for
that, including Kang's replacing resistors in
the amp. He also noticed a similar thing and
posited a larger solution. See his website
Small Wonder QRP for clues.

Re: Bitx40 - receiver works great, but do not transmit #bitx40help

Jerry Gaffke
 

That's looks great if you want a high impedance probe for your oscilloscope or spectrum analyzer.
RF goes in, bigger RF at the same frequency goes out

But that is not a suitable RF probe for a DVM, where you want RF in, and a DC voltage out
that represents how strong the RF in was.

There are some similar AD8307 probes available on Ebay that I previously pointed to 
in response to one of your posts, they look much more suitable though I have not tried them.

Jerry, KE7ER


On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 02:45 pm, Joe Puma wrote:
I’m waiting for this to come in the mail: RF Active Probe 0.1-1.5GHz  analyzer oscilloscope

Re: Tinny sounding electric miss on uBitx

John Backo
 

Oops -- I noticed you said "tinny when
monitoring in another receiver..."

That would rule out the BFO in YOUR receiver.

It could be the voice quality of your mic amplifier.
There have been various solutions posited for
that, including Kang's replacing resistors in
the amp. He also noticed a similar thing and
posited a larger solution. See his website
Small Wonder QRP for clues.

john
AD5YE

Re: Bitx40 - receiver works great, but do not transmit #bitx40help

Joe Puma
 

I’m waiting for this to come in the mail 

image1.png



On Feb 11, 2018, at 5:08 PM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke@...> wrote:

Good advice, build a diode RF probe.
A germanium diode such as the 1n34a or 1n60 works well, but they are expensive now and hard to get.
A schottky diode (such as the Bat54s used on the Bitx40 diode mixers) works reasonably well.
A standard silicon diode such as a 1n4148 might be good enough for measuring fairly high RF power nodes 
such as at the antenna port of a working transmitter, but definitely will not see the expected RF voltage at the base of Q13.
The issue here is the forward voltage drop for small currents, perhaps 0.3v for the Schottky and 0.6v for the 1n4148.

The germanium diodes will be less than the Schottky but dependent on temperature.
The datasheet punts, and says 1 volt max at 5ma, should be good down to 100mv or so with the currents involved in an RF probe at 10megaohms:
    http://www.nteinc.com/specs/original/1N34A.pdf
    https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/223813/the-classic-1n34a-ge-diode-has-a-vf-of-1v-how-could-a-diode-with-such-a-high

N5ESE tries to explain the probe, but only goes so far.
That RF probe design assumes a voltmeter with an input resistance of 10megaohms,
some DVM's will have an input resistance that is considerably less.
So don't count on that probe reading RMS voltages accurately until somehow calibrated.
As the RF voltages approach the forward voltage drop across the diode it will become less and less accurate,
though can still be surprisingly useful (perhaps with a calibration chart) down to a few tens of millivolts if you have the right diode.
Also, N5ESE fails to mention that the capacitance between the probes into the DVM is an integral part of the design,
that capacitance along with his 4.7megaohm resistor forms a low pass filter so that the meter sees DC instead of rectified RF.


We should have a spare Bat54s plus cap and resistor into an analog Nano pin, 
so we can all have a common way of measuring RF voltages when debugging.
With different diodes and different voltmeters, we will all get different results and cannot usefully compare our measurements.

Jerry, KE7ER



On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 01:14 pm, M Garza wrote:
Since you do not have a watt meter, and you have a multimeter, you could build a rf probe.  You can see the rf voltage and calculate the wattage.
Here is a link to one you can build.  It is very easy:
 

Re: Tinny sounding electric miss on uBitx

John Backo
 

Mike, Bill is probably right,

Check and adjust your BFO first. That is
almost always the reason for poor voice quality,
especially since others are using the more or
less the same setup and not reporting problems.

You will have to reload the software (maybe several times)
adjusting the BFO frequency until it sounds right. First,
use a frequency counter to find out what the present BFO
is. Record it so you can always reset it if the problem
turns out to be something different. Then find out what the
software says is your BFO and adjust it up or down by
500 Hz or so. Check the results and go from there...

It is relatively easy with a VFO, but using software makes
the job somewhat harder.

john
AD5YE.

Re: Blown by nearby transceiver #bitx40help

Joe Puma
 

Hey Jerry, I’ve had strange things like his happen to me with other equipment when transmitting even with a little Power like the bitx40.  I’ve zapped the inductors on a SpyVerter and SV1AFN upconverter, fried them completely, the spyverter has board damage too but nothing else, no other components. Heck, I’ve fried the SV1AFN a few times with my 100w radio and finally beyond repair because it killed the mixer and too many things I didn’t have parts for.  My SDR Antenna is near my long wire TX antenna I use for my Yaesu and the bitx40 when I had it. 

It happened mostly when I was tuning up, actually I think only when tuning up. And especially on 160. I’ve watched an inductor burn up right before my eyes when the tuner was chattering. Must of been throwing high voltages everywhere. RF sure is amazing lol. I’m still learning. 


Joe
KD2NFC 


On Feb 11, 2018, at 4:34 PM, Jerry Gaffke via Groups.Io <jgaffke@...> wrote:

From the photo, looks like a burned trace from C6 to L3.
From the Bitx40 schematic it's hard to imagine how that might have happened.
That node is isolated from other parts of the rig that might have significant DC power by multiple DC blocking caps.
RF power there should be milliwatts, even with a nearby QRO transmitter.
Even a loose wire with +12VDC on it striking that node would not blow the trace since there is no path to ground.
L3 is a toroid and thus inherently well shielded, I doubt significant RF was coupled directly into L3 somehow.

Could be that all you need to do is fix the trace.
But the cause is totally unexplained, and something with enough power to scorch a trace like that has enough power 
to blow out many other things.  Fixing this might require finding somebody with a scope and bag of spare parts.

Do let us know what parts had to be replaced once you get this fixed.
And any guesses as to how it happened.
For me at least, truly a mystery.

Jerry, KE7ER

On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 08:41 am, Gordon Gibby wrote:
Looks like L3, and possibly other series elements in the 40 m filter got way too much voltage. You’ll probably have to use an ohmmeter to test out each connection and see what has become non-conductive.  I suspect Q 13 got fried in the process, and there are two other transistors that would’ve been connected that might’ve been damaged as well from the schematic.  With some care, these can be replaced by ordinary 2N3904 transistors.
 

Re: No power increase with higher voltage?

John Backo
 

Well, gentlemen, we have a true ham here.

If RF is getting back into your booster and changing the output voltage,
there are 2 solutions; either block the RF with a filter (and shielding),
or change to a linear power supply.

I like linear supplies because they are almost stone silent and
handle RF very well. But they are heavy and consume more power.

It should be a rather simple matter to block the RF back into the power
supply with an adequate filter. The problem is finding one that works
over the entire transmit range. But it can be done. Another problem
might be that your booster cannot handle the output wattage at higher
levels. You may need to replace it with something better.

Keep it up; you're doing fine.

john
AD5YE

Re: No power increase with higher voltage?

Nick VK4PP
 

HI Vic,
Interesting observations.... I am having a similar issue with my uBITX and a booster, Ill try the 24v battery solution....

73. Nik

Re: Bitx40 - receiver works great, but do not transmit #bitx40help

Jerry Gaffke
 

Good advice, build a diode RF probe.
A germanium diode such as the 1n34a or 1n60 works well, but they are expensive now and hard to get.
A schottky diode (such as the Bat54s used on the Bitx40 diode mixers) works reasonably well.
A standard silicon diode such as a 1n4148 might be good enough for measuring fairly high RF power nodes 
such as at the antenna port of a working transmitter, but definitely will not see the expected RF voltage at the base of Q13.
The issue here is the forward voltage drop for small currents, perhaps 0.3v for the Schottky and 0.6v for the 1n4148.

The germanium diodes will be less than the Schottky but dependent on temperature.
The datasheet punts, and says 1 volt max at 5ma, should be good down to 100mv or so with the currents involved in an RF probe at 10megaohms:
    http://www.nteinc.com/specs/original/1N34A.pdf
    https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/223813/the-classic-1n34a-ge-diode-has-a-vf-of-1v-how-could-a-diode-with-such-a-high

N5ESE tries to explain the probe, but only goes so far.
That RF probe design assumes a voltmeter with an input resistance of 10megaohms,
some DVM's will have an input resistance that is considerably less.
So don't count on that probe reading RMS voltages accurately until somehow calibrated.
As the RF voltages approach the forward voltage drop across the diode it will become less and less accurate,
though can still be surprisingly useful (perhaps with a calibration chart) down to a few tens of millivolts if you have the right diode.
Also, N5ESE fails to mention that the capacitance between the probes into the DVM is an integral part of the design,
that capacitance along with his 4.7megaohm resistor forms a low pass filter so that the meter sees DC instead of rectified RF.


We should have a spare Bat54s plus cap and resistor into an analog Nano pin, 
so we can all have a common way of measuring RF voltages when debugging.
With different diodes and different voltmeters, we will all get different results and cannot usefully compare our measurements.

Jerry, KE7ER



On Sun, Feb 11, 2018 at 01:14 pm, M Garza wrote:
Since you do not have a watt meter, and you have a multimeter, you could build a rf probe.  You can see the rf voltage and calculate the wattage.
Here is a link to one you can build.  It is very easy: