Date   
Re: My µBITX in its new home

Jim Sheldon
 

Nope.  I couldn't find one either.  I've taken a knob for a 1/4" shaft, some 1/4" diameter Nylon rod, drilled the center out of the rod, drilled a hole in the side of the rod big enough to pass the set screw and cut the rod to length so it remains flush with the bottom of the hole in the knob.  Run the set screw down far enough to hold it in place until you get ready to mount it on the pot shaft.  Usually you will have to cut the shaft of the supplied pot to the right length as well.  Caveat, make sure you don't cut the shaft too short - LOL  Fortunately that happened on something else long ago and I haven't forgotten the lesson.

Jim - W0EB

------ Original Message ------
From: "Jack Purdum via Groups.Io" <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: 1/9/2018 10:26:55 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home


. BTW, am I the only person finding it difficult to find a knob for the small volume control?

Jack, W8TEE



Re: My µBITX in its new home

Jack, W8TEE
 

Nice! I have a member in my club who has a machine that makes signs out of Plexiglass. He can carve "mirror image" letters on the "inside" of a sign. I though I might get him to do a clear Plexiglass front panel with the controls ID'ed from the back side. I'd still have to figure out some what of masking the display. BTW, am I the only person finding it difficult to find a knob for the small volume control?

Jack, W8TEE



From: Jim Sheldon <w0eb@...>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 10:20 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

Hi Jack et al,
I'm lucky in that due to a small business I have making "Dot Stabilizers" to take the scratchy keying out of semi-automatic keys (Bugs), I have a small bench-top milling machine.  Once I got some clamps made to hold the workpiece square with the edge of the X-Y table, I just use a block of wood under the piece and clamp everything to the table.  I get it square and then make sure the clamps are tight enough that it can't move under the cutting pressure from the bit.  Then it's a simple matter of following the layout lines.

I usually make the opening just the size of the actual lit part of the display and using standoffs I mount the display flush with the rear of the front panel.  

During the layout, I locate the 4 mounting holes for the display and drill them.  I then screw the panel to the wood block and square that up with the edge of the table.  Once I have the cutout milled, I touch it up with a flat file to take out any minor flaws and countersink the 4 mounting holes to take flat head screws flush with the panel (or even a little deeper).  I use flat head screws and mount the 4 display mounting standoffs tight to the panel and use "Loc-Tite" to make sure they don't loosen up.  I buy Lexan, stick on bezels from a company called Seetron that sells them on eBay, 3 for $12.00 US.  They cover the mounting screws and provide a black bordered, clear Lexan window over the display for really good protection.

Shown below is an example (my uBITX in it's home, a 4SQRP.com "Large" enclosure designed by AA0ZZ and made from PC board material.  The color is already silkscreened on the material when you get it.

Jim, W0EB





------ Original Message ------
From: "Jack Purdum via Groups.Io" <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: 1/9/2018 8:19:46 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

I have a bezel and knobs coming, but this is what it looks like so far:

Inline image

The cutout process varies according to the panel material. For plastic, first I draw and outline of the LCD and then I drill 4 holes at the corners, but inside the lcd cutout you've drawn. I then put a T-square to align with the line drawn along one edge of the cutout. I then put the panel and T-square in a vice and saw along the line, relying on the T-square to prevent me from "coloring outside the lines". After I've made the cut, a few passes with a file and that edge is done. Rotate and repeat. If it's metal, I align with the jaws of the vice with the LCD outline and drill a series of small holes. I then use a hacksaw blade to cut the line and finish with a file. The Dremel would probably work wonders here instead of the file.

Jack, W8TEE



From: Keith VE7GDH <ve7gdh@...>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 2:54 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

Doug KD9CYF wrote...

> Care to share your technique?

My uBITXs should show up any day now! On my BITX40, I
used a cutting wheel in a rotary tool, cutting the opening
slightly undersize, and then used a file to even it up
a bit and make it large enough. It worked well, but I won't
know until the next one if I just got lucky or if it will
be easy every time. I don't have any bezels.

--
73 Keith VE7GDH






Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: uBITX Case

at91r40008
 

I found this black anodized aluminum case that fits the uBitx.
It is a lit too deep but I'll use the empty space for batteries or 
a PA. Only problem there is a trace along the edge of the board
I have to insulate it, maybe with Kapton tape. The board slide
in the internal side slots. About $45,
I uploaded the picture in the photos folder (NU6I)
--
73, Yvon NU6I

Re: uBitx with first mod and question

Vince Vielhaber
 

Looks great!!!

Vince.

On 01/09/2018 08:52 AM, KD8CGH wrote:
Here is my uBitx after first mods. I added a Sotabeams CW audio fiilter.
The old TR switch now controls the filter. Down is the original wide
SSB, middle is the normal CW and top is narrow CW. The right light is
spot indicator controlled by the CW filter and lights when you are well
tuned. Unfortunately adding the filter (goes before final AF amp)
raised the receiver noise. I'm working on shielding to restore the
original performance. Suggestions would be appreciated.
It still needs anti pop, a better bezel, ...

Re: My µBITX in its new home

Vince Vielhaber
 

Instead of the dremel, I opted for a full machine shop (lathe, mill, surface grinder, drill press, welders, ...).

Vince.

On 01/09/2018 05:03 AM, David Wilcox via Groups.Io wrote:
Don't all home brewers have a Dremel tool with an assortment of cutting blades and grinding bits to smooth out the rough edges. I couldn't live without them. I use mine for home repairs, car repairs and everything radio. I first discovered their utility in my medical practice. I had many elderly patients with bunions, callouses and thick toe nails that interfered with foot health and comfort. Many of them couldn't afford to see the podiatrist so I set up a vacuum cleaner that the patient held in place and while we were kibitzing I ground away with my Dremel..... Made some friends and had some fun. When I retired I had four Dremels and many different grinding tools. Had to buy a cutting wheel or two for the radio room. Thought everyone would get a laugh from this. (I started out as a country GP and had to do it all. There were no specialists close.)

Dave K8WPE



On Jan 9, 2018, at 2:54 AM, Keith VE7GDH <ve7gdh@...> wrote:

Doug KD9CYF wrote...

Care to share your technique?
My uBITXs should show up any day now! On my BITX40, I
used a cutting wheel in a rotary tool, cutting the opening
slightly undersize, and then used a file to even it up
a bit and make it large enough. It worked well, but I won't
know until the next one if I just got lucky or if it will
be easy every time. I don't have any bezels.

--
73 Keith VE7GDH



Re: My µBITX in its new home

Jim Sheldon
 

Hi Jack et al,
I'm lucky in that due to a small business I have making "Dot Stabilizers" to take the scratchy keying out of semi-automatic keys (Bugs), I have a small bench-top milling machine.  Once I got some clamps made to hold the workpiece square with the edge of the X-Y table, I just use a block of wood under the piece and clamp everything to the table.  I get it square and then make sure the clamps are tight enough that it can't move under the cutting pressure from the bit.  Then it's a simple matter of following the layout lines.

I usually make the opening just the size of the actual lit part of the display and using standoffs I mount the display flush with the rear of the front panel.  

During the layout, I locate the 4 mounting holes for the display and drill them.  I then screw the panel to the wood block and square that up with the edge of the table.  Once I have the cutout milled, I touch it up with a flat file to take out any minor flaws and countersink the 4 mounting holes to take flat head screws flush with the panel (or even a little deeper).  I use flat head screws and mount the 4 display mounting standoffs tight to the panel and use "Loc-Tite" to make sure they don't loosen up.  I buy Lexan, stick on bezels from a company called Seetron that sells them on eBay, 3 for $12.00 US.  They cover the mounting screws and provide a black bordered, clear Lexan window over the display for really good protection.

Shown below is an example (my uBITX in it's home, a 4SQRP.com "Large" enclosure designed by AA0ZZ and made from PC board material.  The color is already silkscreened on the material when you get it.

Jim, W0EB





------ Original Message ------
From: "Jack Purdum via Groups.Io" <jjpurdum@...>
Sent: 1/9/2018 8:19:46 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

I have a bezel and knobs coming, but this is what it looks like so far:

Inline image

The cutout process varies according to the panel material. For plastic, first I draw and outline of the LCD and then I drill 4 holes at the corners, but inside the lcd cutout you've drawn. I then put a T-square to align with the line drawn along one edge of the cutout. I then put the panel and T-square in a vice and saw along the line, relying on the T-square to prevent me from "coloring outside the lines". After I've made the cut, a few passes with a file and that edge is done. Rotate and repeat. If it's metal, I align with the jaws of the vice with the LCD outline and drill a series of small holes. I then use a hacksaw blade to cut the line and finish with a file. The Dremel would probably work wonders here instead of the file.

Jack, W8TEE



From: Keith VE7GDH <ve7gdh@...>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 2:54 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

Doug KD9CYF wrote...

> Care to share your technique?

My uBITXs should show up any day now! On my BITX40, I
used a cutting wheel in a rotary tool, cutting the opening
slightly undersize, and then used a file to even it up
a bit and make it large enough. It worked well, but I won't
know until the next one if I just got lucky or if it will
be easy every time. I don't have any bezels.

--
73 Keith VE7GDH






Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: uBITX Case

Michael Hagen
 

Those rings are to center the jack in a hole on a metal panel.  So you would drill the metal panel with that hole size.

On a 1/16" they can only be 1/32" extended, so the Jack can be tightend.

Of course in Plastic, you don't care about shorts.  You could leave them on and ream out the holes a bit?

Mike, WA6ISP


On 1/9/2018 7:07 AM, Michael Babineau wrote:
Bill : 

These jacks normally have a little raised plastic collar as part of the molded plastic body. This seems to be the problem as it prevents
the jack body from sitting flush against the panel. This collar is about 1mm thick. I found that carefully
cutting it away with an exacto knife give you the added length for the jack to protrude far enough through the opening 
to screw on the ring to secure it, when using the Excellway case.  

Removing this plastic collar doesn't seem to have any major effect on the structural integrity of the jack.

Cheers

Michael VE3WMB 

-- 
Mike Hagen, WA6ISP
10917 Bryant Street
Yucaipa, Ca. 92399
(909) 918-0058
PayPal ID  "MotDog@..."
Mike@...

Re: uBITX Case

 

Bill : 

These jacks normally have a little raised plastic collar as part of the molded plastic body. This seems to be the problem as it prevents
the jack body from sitting flush against the panel. This collar is about 1mm thick. I found that carefully
cutting it away with an exacto knife give you the added length for the jack to protrude far enough through the opening 
to screw on the ring to secure it, when using the Excellway case.  

Removing this plastic collar doesn't seem to have any major effect on the structural integrity of the jack.

Cheers

Michael VE3WMB 

Re: Yaesu MH-31 mic #ubitx

Gordon Gibby <ggibby@...>
 

So commercial microphones vary in their schematics, but if you look it up and figure out how to get most closely to the electret part it should work fine.   Some and some radio frequency bypassing circuitry, and some adid some audio filtering.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 9, 2018, at 09:56, Art Howard <k0kuk.vhf@...> wrote:

I intend to set mine up with an HT speaker mic connector and play with a few of those to see how they work
Art
K0KUK

On 9 Jan 2018 8:39 am, "Craig Wadsworth" <cwadsworth@...> wrote:
Has anyone tried a Yaesu (Vertex Standard) MH-31 microphone with the uBitX or BitX40?  Work well?  Smoke? Other?
Thanks,
Craig
w9ctw



Re: Yaesu MH-31 mic #ubitx

Art Howard
 

I intend to set mine up with an HT speaker mic connector and play with a few of those to see how they work
Art
K0KUK

On 9 Jan 2018 8:39 am, "Craig Wadsworth" <cwadsworth@...> wrote:
Has anyone tried a Yaesu (Vertex Standard) MH-31 microphone with the uBitX or BitX40?  Work well?  Smoke? Other?
Thanks,
Craig
w9ctw



Re: uBitx with first mod and question

KD8CGH
 

More info on the mod. I added wires:
  from the volume wiper to the rotary center.
  from rotary position 1 to Audio connector (original wiper destination) 
  rotary 2 & 3 to AF filter in
  AF filter out to tie point at rotary rotary 1 (back to Audio connector)

I tried replacing the wires with shielded mono audio cable with one end of shields tied together and grounded but it didn't help.
The filter itself is on a perfboad mounted to the right edge of the speaker so it is also very near the Raduino.

Any suggestions on next thing to try?

Re: uBitx with first mod and question

KD8CGH
 

I'm well familiar with the Heathkit  Twoer "Benton Harbor Lunchbox". I built one a in Junior High school shop many decades ago. It disappeared from my life over the years.
This Sixer was not only dead but decomposed. Although I could scrub off the case, it's insides were covered in some kind of corrosion that didn't just come off.

Re: My µBITX in its new home

Jack, W8TEE
 

Nope, I used a flat file. However, it was held in the hand of a 74 year old. Actually, I like the side teeth as it makes it pretty easy to get square corners.

Jack, W8TEE



From: Raj vu2zap <rajendrakumargg@...>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 9:37 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

Doc,

Looks like you used a 1/2 round file. For such windows a flat file without side teeth is best!

Raj

At 09/01/2018, you wrote:
I have a bezel and knobs coming, but this is what it looks like so far:

Inline image

The cutout process varies according to the panel material. For plastic, first I draw and outline of the LCD and then I drill 4 holes at the corners, but inside the lcd cutout you've drawn. I then put a T-square to align with the line drawn along one edge of the cutout. I then put the panel and T-square in a vice and saw along the line, relying on the T-square to prevent me from "coloring outside the lines". After I've made the cut, a few passes with a file and that edge is done. Rotate and repeat. If it's metal, I align with the jaws of the vice with the LCD outline and drill a series of small holes. I then use a hacksaw blade to cut the line and finish with a file. The Dremel would probably work wonders here instead of the file.

Jack, W8TEE



Virus-free. www.avast.com

Yaesu MH-31 mic #ubitx

Craig Wadsworth <cwadsworth@...>
 

Has anyone tried a Yaesu (Vertex Standard) MH-31 microphone with the uBitX or BitX40? Work well? Smoke? Other?
Thanks,
Craig
w9ctw

Re: uBitx with first mod and question

k3eee@...
 

Rare? I have over 15 of them $ 5.00 at swat meet's many times FREE.


On 1/9/2018 9:23 AM, Karl Schwab via Groups.Io wrote:
Mods sound good, but to a "rare" Heathkit  Benton Harbor Lunchbox?  Karl


On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 8:53 AM, KD8CGH <rkayakr@...> wrote:


Here is my uBitx after first mods. I added a Sotabeams CW audio fiilter. The old TR switch now controls the filter. Down is the original wide SSB, middle is the normal CW and top is narrow CW. The right light is spot indicator controlled by the CW filter and lights when you are well tuned. Unfortunately adding the filter (goes before final AF amp)  raised the receiver noise. I'm working on shielding to restore the original performance.  Suggestions would be appreciated.
It still needs anti pop, a better bezel, ...




Re: My µBITX in its new home

 

Doc,

Looks like you used a 1/2 round file. For such windows a flat file without side teeth is best!

Raj


At 09/01/2018, you wrote:
I have a bezel and knobs coming, but this is what it looks like so far:



The cutout process varies according to the panel material. For plastic, first I draw and outline of the LCD and then I drill 4 holes at the corners, but inside the lcd cutout you've drawn. I then put a T-square to align with the line drawn along one edge of the cutout. I then put the panel and T-square in a vice and saw along the line, relying on the T-square to prevent me from "coloring outside the lines". After I've made the cut, a few passes with a file and that edge is done. Rotate and repeat. If it's metal, I align with the jaws of the vice with the LCD outline and drill a series of small holes. I then use a hacksaw blade to cut the line and finish with a file. The Dremel would probably work wonders here instead of the file.

Jack, W8TEE

Re: uBitx with first mod and question

Karl Schwab
 

Mods sound good, but to a "rare" Heathkit  Benton Harbor Lunchbox?  Karl


On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 8:53 AM, KD8CGH <rkayakr@...> wrote:


Here is my uBitx after first mods. I added a Sotabeams CW audio fiilter. The old TR switch now controls the filter. Down is the original wide SSB, middle is the normal CW and top is narrow CW. The right light is spot indicator controlled by the CW filter and lights when you are well tuned. Unfortunately adding the filter (goes before final AF amp)  raised the receiver noise. I'm working on shielding to restore the original performance.  Suggestions would be appreciated.
It still needs anti pop, a better bezel, ...



Re: My µBITX in its new home

Jack, W8TEE
 

I have a bezel and knobs coming, but this is what it looks like so far:

Inline image

The cutout process varies according to the panel material. For plastic, first I draw and outline of the LCD and then I drill 4 holes at the corners, but inside the lcd cutout you've drawn. I then put a T-square to align with the line drawn along one edge of the cutout. I then put the panel and T-square in a vice and saw along the line, relying on the T-square to prevent me from "coloring outside the lines". After I've made the cut, a few passes with a file and that edge is done. Rotate and repeat. If it's metal, I align with the jaws of the vice with the LCD outline and drill a series of small holes. I then use a hacksaw blade to cut the line and finish with a file. The Dremel would probably work wonders here instead of the file.

Jack, W8TEE



From: Keith VE7GDH <ve7gdh@...>
To: BITX20@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 2:54 AM
Subject: Re: [BITX20] My µBITX in its new home

Doug KD9CYF wrote...

> Care to share your technique?

My uBITXs should show up any day now! On my BITX40, I
used a cutting wheel in a rotary tool, cutting the opening
slightly undersize, and then used a file to even it up
a bit and make it large enough. It worked well, but I won't
know until the next one if I just got lucky or if it will
be easy every time. I don't have any bezels.

--
73 Keith VE7GDH






Virus-free. www.avast.com

uBitx with first mod and question

KD8CGH
 

Here is my uBitx after first mods. I added a Sotabeams CW audio fiilter. The old TR switch now controls the filter. Down is the original wide SSB, middle is the normal CW and top is narrow CW. The right light is spot indicator controlled by the CW filter and lights when you are well tuned. Unfortunately adding the filter (goes before final AF amp)  raised the receiver noise. I'm working on shielding to restore the original performance.  Suggestions would be appreciated.
It still needs anti pop, a better bezel, ...

Re: tx pop

 

Mark,

This topic refers to uBitx. Both B40 and uB have similar issues as the audio preamp and mic amp are identical.

Raj


At 09/01/2018, you wrote:
Is this Mod for the Bitx-40 of the Micro-Bitx ?  Starting to get a bit of a muddle reading posts now on here , Not knowing what version of BITX there for ..


Mark  'Gw0wvl' ...

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 at 4:29, Raj vu2zap
<rajendrakumargg@...> wrote:
Farhan,
I have been thinking of diode switching in the audio stages. The TX 12v can block the RX preamp and vice-versa.
I have to get back to town to try!
Raj
At 09/01/2018, you wrote:
>i have been trying to hack out the tx pop. it is a far more intricate problem than it does seem at first. to cut a very long and painful story short, i am not yet there. but i have a partial solution.
>
>add a 470uf (or a 220uf) capacitor in parallel to C50. The C50 is the 1uf capacitor that feeds the detector signal to the audio pre-amp. Increasing this to 470uf, prolongs the 'switch on' time of the audio preamp just enough to not hear the TX-to-RX thump.
>
>can someone else too try this out?
>
>i call it a partial solution because it doesn't suppress the rx-to-tx pop (which is not as bad as the tx-to-rx pop).
>
>- f