Re: Amazing video from ATT archives freely available on youtube

Tom, wb6b
 

Hi,

It is interesting that the Bell Labs film and the MIT film both came out in 1959. In reading a little about the presenters in the films it looks like this was no accident. The Sputnik satellite launch sent shockwaves through the US and there was a big push for more and better science education. 

Both of these people (and certainly many more) obviously were very smart and interested in improving the physics education of the time. It is a good thing they were there to invent the teaching tools they did. Without the big science push of the day, maybe only the few that attended their lectures personally would have been lucky enough to see these demonstrations. It is fun (and educational) to see these time capsules from the beginnings of the space age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_N._Shive
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_G._King_(physicist)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Science_Study_Committee

A side note. Right after the Bell Labs wave video was another old video by Tektronix on transmission lines. The interesting thing they did was send narrow pulses down a long coax cable and look at the pulses into the cable with open, short and proper termination. Had fun doing the same experiments this evening with a signal generator, scope and a long piece of cable TV coax. Also tried source termination, where the output of the coax is unterminated, but you terminate the input of the coax with a series resistor to the center conductor. I'd used the source termination method for sending digital data down ribbon cables in the past. Was fun to do this again just for play and remind myself it actually works. 

Thanks Laurence for linking the original video, it lead to a bit of fun and learning.

Tom, wb6b

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